English

Courses

ENGL 0100. INTEGRATED READING/WRITING. 1 Hour.

Integrates critical reading and academic writing skills. Fulfills Texas Success Initiative (TSI) requirements for reading and/or writing. This course may not substitute for any other English course, and credit in this course does not fulfill any degree requirements.

ENGL 0300. INTRODUCTION TO CRITICAL READING AND WRITING. 3 Hours.

Offers additional preparation in academic reading and writing. Focus is on comprehending college-level reading material and writing academic essays in standard written English. Fulfills Texas Success Initiative (TSI) requirements. This course may not substitute for any other English course, and credit in this course does not fulfill any degree requirement.

ENGL 0301. INTEGRATED READING AND WRITING FUNDAMENTALS. 3 Hours.

A corequisite developmental course that focuses on the rhetorical knowledge, critical thinking skills, and writing and revising processes required in ENGL 1301. Students work with an instructor to analyze assignment prompts, revise and edit essays, and review ENGL 1301 readings and lectures.

ENGL 1200. ENGLISH STUDIES PROFESSIONALIZATION AND STUDENT SUCCESS. 2 Hours.

Introduces students to the profession of English Studies at the college level. Teaches student success skills that will assist new students in their transition to college. Helps students identify their individual needs, determine what resources are appropriate to address those needs, recognize the role faculty play in their development, and formulate a plan for an actively engaged and enriched experience from campus to career. Will be taught by Peer Academic Leaders (PALS) and faculty, staff, and/or graduate students, who will provide guidance, raise awareness and understanding of the English and English with Teaching Certification majors and related minors, and help support collaborative and co-curricular opportunities available within the College of Liberal Arts. Reserved exclusively for students planning to major in the English BA or English BA with Teacher Certification degree tracks. Fulfills the University requirement for UNIV 1131.

ENGL 1301. RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I. 3 Hours. (TCCN = ENGL 1301)

Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

ENGL 1302. RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II. 3 Hours. (TCCN = ENGL 1302)

Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students' own claims, reasons, and evidence. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

ENGL 2303. TOPICS IN LITERATURE. 3 Hours. (TCCN = ENGL 2341)

Focuses on a particular genre, theme, or issue to enable comparison and analysis of several texts. Emphasizes critical thinking, reading, and writing. Topics may include disability in comics, working-class literature, magical realism, or environmental literature and film. May be repeated for credit when course content changes. Satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301.

ENGL 2309. WORLD LITERATURE. 3 Hours. (TCCN = ENGL 2331)

Covers significant works of world literature chosen from various national and cultural traditions, focusing on cross-cultural issues. Topics may include moral ambiguities across cultures, the transition from colonial to postcolonial literatures, or the nature of translation; the course may also be structured as a chronological survey. Examines at least three genres and six authors. Emphasizes critical thinking, reading, and writing. Satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301.

ENGL 2319. BRITISH LITERATURE. 3 Hours. (TCCN = ENGL 2321)

Concentrates on how cultural, geographic, and political issues shape and are shaped by British literature. Topics may include the nature of empire, Romantic conceptions of heroism, or literary representations of the sciences; the course may also be structured as a chronological survey. Examines at least three genres and six authors. Emphasizes critical thinking, reading, and writing. Satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301.

ENGL 2329. AMERICAN LITERATURE. 3 Hours. (TCCN = ENGL 2326)

Concentrates on how cultural, geographic, and political issues shape and are shaped by American literature. Topics may include the struggle to discover a national identity, the transition from war to postwar periods, or the tensions of a multicultural society; the course may also be structured as a chronological survey. Examines at least three genres and six authors. Emphasizes critical thinking, reading, and writing. Satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in Language, Philosophy, and Culture. Prerequisites: C or better in ENGL 1301.

ENGL 2338. TECHNICAL WRITING. 3 Hours.

Covers the processes of researching, drafting, designing, editing, and revising technical reports, proposals, instructions, resumes, and professional correspondence for specific audiences. Prerequisites: C or better in ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302.

ENGL 2350. INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION. 3 Hours.

Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302.

ENGL 2384. STRUCTURE OF MODERN ENGLISH. 3 Hours.

Explores Modern English grammar at the level of the word, phrase, and sentence, not to teach "proper" English but to discover and understand the unique structure of the language. Required for English and English/Education majors. Prerequisites: C or better in ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302.

ENGL 3300. TOPICS IN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

May include such topics as Utopian literature, the American short story, literature and philosophy, introduction to theatre, and modern British fiction. May be repeated for credit when content changes. Prerequisites: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3301. TOPICS IN RUSSIAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. 3 Hours.

Covers the works of major Russian authors during the period from the beginning of Russian literature until the 1917 Revolution, focusing on the interrelationship of various literary movements and philosophies. Students receiving credit in Russian will complete a research project using the Russian language. May be repeated for credit as topics and periods vary. Offered as ENGL 3301 and RUSS 3301; credit will be granted in only one department. Prerequisites: ENGL 3301-English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329). RUSS 3301-RUSS 2314 or equivalent with a grade of C or better, or knowledge of the language and permission of the instructor.

ENGL 3306. TOPICS IN SOVIET AND POST-SOVIET LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. 3 Hours.

Covers the works of major Soviet and post-Soviet authors from 1917 to the present against the background of unfolding social and political development in the USSR and post-USSR. Students receiving credit in Russian will complete a research project using the Russian language. May be repeated for credit as topics and periods vary. Offered as ENGL 3306 and RUSS 3306; credit will be granted in only one department. Prerequisites: ENGL 3306-English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329). RUSS 3306-RUSS 2314 or equivalent with a grade of C or better, or knowledge of the language and permission of the instructor.

ENGL 3333. DYNAMIC TRADITIONS IN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

An introduction to literary study that focuses primarily on changes over time to a movement, genre, or motif, such as Romanticism, detective fiction, or animals. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302.

ENGL 3339. CLASSICAL BACKGROUNDS. 3 Hours.

Literature of the Greco-Roman world including, but not limited to, The Odyssey, selected Greek tragedies, The Aeneid, Metamorphoses, and selected lyrics, epigrams, and satires. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3340. HISTORY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

American literature from its beginnings as related to the development of American culture; may include the study of canon formation. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3342. AMERICAN POETRY. 3 Hours.

Examines the forms, traditions, and cultural contexts of the poetry of the United States. May include the relationship between American poetry and poetry written in English elsewhere, and/or poetry written in other languages. Prerequisites: for English majors, ENGL 2350; for non-majors, 6 hours of sophomore literature or 3 hours of sophomore literature with a grade of A.

ENGL 3343. LATINO/A LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Explores Latino/a literature of the United States from the nineteenth century through the present as conditioned by the intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, and regional variation. Texts may include novels, poetry, drama, short fiction, and non-fiction by and about peoples in the U.S. with heritage from South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico. Offered as ENGL 3343 and MAS 3343; credit will be granted in only one department. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3344. NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURES. 3 Hours.

Examines selected oral and written texts composed by Native peoples of North America. Includes selections of oral narratives, autobiography, fiction, and poetry, and may include drama and film. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3345. AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Examines African-American literature in its various traditions, forms, and cultural and historical contexts. Offered as AAST 3345 and ENGL 3345; credit will be granted in only one department. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3346. MEXICAN AMERICAN AND CHICANO/A LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Surveys Mexican American literature from 1848 to the present, including literature of the Chicano movement, focusing on important genres, themes, and historical developments. Offered as ENGL 3346 and MAS 3346; credit will be granted in only one department. Prerequisites: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3347. TOPICS IN MULTICULTURAL AMERICAN LITERATURES. 3 Hours.

Focuses on literature produced within one or more ethnic communities in the U.S. in order to trace a theme or to explore issues such as intersectionality, hybridity/mestizaje, diaspora, or immigrant experiences. Topics may include Afro-Latino poetry, third-world feminist writing, multicultural literature of the Southwest, cultural memory and the Jewish literary tradition, or Asian-American fiction. Offered as ENGL 3347, AAST 3347, and MAS 3347; credit will be granted in only one department, and credit for MAS 3347 will be granted only once. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3351. HISTORY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I. 3 Hours.

Examines British literature from its origins through the eighteenth century, focusing on the relationship between literature and its social and historical contexts. Covers the emergence of major genres and modes of the time period, which may include epic, pastoral, lyric, sonnets, drama, and satire. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3352. HISTORY OF BRITISH LITERATURE II. 3 Hours.

Examines British literature from Romanticism to the present, focusing on the relationship between literature and its social and historical contexts. Texts may include poetry, novels, plays, essays, and short stories. Prerequisites: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3353. GOTHIC LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Examines the established conventions, cultural contexts, and theoretical underpinnings of gothic literature. May focus on a particular region and/or time period, such as the gothic literature of the British Empire during the fin de siècle, or on a major theme, such as identity construction in gothic literature. Prerequisite: for English majors, ENGL 2350; for non-majors, 6 hours of sophomore literature or 3 hours of sophomore literature with a grade of A.

ENGL 3355. POST-COLONIAL LITERATURE IN ENGLISH. 3 Hours.

Examines twentieth and twenty-first-century literature produced in formerly colonized nations. May include literature from the Indian subcontinent; various countries in Africa; Korea; Australia; New Zealand; Canada; and/or Latin America. Emphasizes critical and theoretical methods, examining such themes as identity, belonging, exile, place, language, sovereignty, and hybridity, and considers the pervasive artistic, psychological, and political impacts of colonization. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3361. HISTORY OF WORLD LITERATURE I. 3 Hours.

Examines major texts from early oral and manuscript traditions through the first centuries of printing. Texts and authors studied may include the Bible, Homer, the Greek dramatists, Vergil and other Roman poets, medieval epic and romance, Dante, Petrarch, Ariosto, Montaigne, and Cervantes. Prerequisites: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3362. HISTORY OF WORLD LITERATURE II. 3 Hours.

Examines major literary texts from the mid-seventeenth century to the present. Material might cover Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, Postcolonial literature, Magical Realism, and the literature of globalization, as well as various theoretical problems involved in such a study of world literature, including delimiting the field, translation, and English as a global language. Prerequisites: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3363. BOOK HISTORY AND PRINT CULTURE. 3 Hours.

Examines the creation, production, distribution, and reception of books, serials, and ephemera across history, with a focus on the shifts from orality to literacy, writing to printing, and analog to digital media. Draws upon theories and concepts from rhetoric, material culture, sociology, economics, and graphic design, as well as studies in reading, literacy, and the creation and transmission of meaning. Introduces students to principles of bibliographical description and analysis. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3364. TOPICS IN LGBTQIA+ LITERATURE AND THEORY. 3 Hours.

Studies representations of the sexual and/or gender identities of LGBTQIA+ people and the intersectionality among them through a variety of texts. Specific topics may include the history of marginalized sexualities, crossdressing in literature, or transvestite saints; the texts may be philosophical, political, literary, and/or scientific. Offered as ENGL 3364 and WOMS 3364; credit will be granted in only one department. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3366. TOPICS IN LITERATURE AND ENVIRONMENT. 3 Hours.

Investigates the relationship between literature and the environment, considering how texts and other cultural practices represent and engage with the natural world. Topics may include nature writing, animal studies, plant studies, environmental justice, climate change, or posthumanism. May be repeated for credit when course content changes. Prerequisites:English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3368. TOPICS IN FEMINIST THEORY, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY. 3 Hours.

Examines issues of gender and sexuality through literary, theoretical, and philosophical texts that foreground questions feminist theory raises about desire, sexual identity, and gender asymmetry. Considers how gender and sexuality shape and are shaped by race, ethnicity, class, ability/disability, religion, and age. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Offered as ENGL 3368 and WOMS 3368; credit will be granted in only one department. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3370. HISTORY OF WOMEN'S WRITING. 3 Hours.

Examines women's writing in English from the Medieval period to the present. Offered as ENGL 3370 and WOMS 3370; credit will be granted in only one department. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3371. ADVANCED EXPOSITION. 3 Hours.

An advanced writing course emphasizing writing that explains, demonstrates, or explores a subject. Attention given to audience, invention, arrangement, style, and revision. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302.

ENGL 3372. COMPUTERS AND WRITING. 3 Hours.

An advanced writing course taught in a computer classroom. Emphasizes rhetorical analyses of electronic discourse and writing in electronic environments. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302.

ENGL 3373. ADVANCED TECHNICAL WRITING. 3 Hours.

An advanced writing course, taught in a computer classroom, that focuses on writing in technical, scientific, and/or professional subject matters. Examines technical writing theory and style for producing documents for genre-specific audiences. Assignments may include the creation of a knowledge base, a data visualization, a reference guide, a usability testing report, and/or a video or multimedia tutorial. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302.

ENGL 3374. WRITING, RHETORIC, AND MULTIMODAL AUTHORING. 3 Hours.

Analyzes the rhetorical structure of multimodality (linguistic, visual, oral, gestural, and spatial modes of communication). Emphasizes composing writing-intensive and research-oriented projects for academic, business, and/or creative audiences. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302.

ENGL 3375. CREATIVE WRITING. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the craft of creative writing in the genres of poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. Prerequisites: C or better in ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302.

ENGL 3376. BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING. 3 Hours.

An advanced writing course, taught in a computer classroom, that focuses on writing in the workplace. Emphasizes producing business and professional documents based on current, standardized formats; considering the role of audience; writing in a clear, concise, and appropriate style; and revising texts to improve their effectiveness. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302.

ENGL 3377. TECHNICAL EDITING. 3 Hours.

Editing at different scales of document design, including copyediting, proofreading, and developmental editing. Editing and designing drafts of technical and professional documents. Applying rules and style guides governing technical writing for organizations. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301 and ENGL 2338.

ENGL 3378. TECHNICAL PROCEDURES AND MANUALS. 3 Hours.

Principles of technical communications for developing procedural documentation and manuals. Extensive practice in writing technical procedures and manuals. Students are encouraged to take ENGL 2338: Technical Writing before enrolling. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301.

ENGL 3379. GRANT AND PROPOSAL WRITING. 3 Hours.

Explores how foundational principles of technical communication for user-centered design and document design may be applied to writing persuasive grant applications and proposals relevant for business, philanthropy, the humanities, and/or the sciences, including medicine. Individual and collaborative assignments may include identifying elements of successful and unsuccessful grant applications and proposals, creating a proposal for a client, writing a mock grant application, and/or engaging in service-learning for a local non-profit organization to assist its preparation of a grant application. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and ENGL 2338.

ENGL 3380. RHETORIC AND WRITING WITH SOUND. 3 Hours.

An introduction to rhetorical engagement with recorded sound. Includes work with digital audio tools for writing with sound, critical writing about sound recordings, and readings in the interdisciplinary field of sound studies. May also consider histories and ethnographies of listening, studies of built and natural soundscapes, sound media, sound art, and the nature of listening. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3381. RHETORICAL MAKING. 3 Hours.

Examines the rhetorical impact of designing and developing objects using makerspaces (collaborative technological workshops). Uses modern rhetorical theory to analyze the persuasive and communicative dimensions of fabrication and coding. Projects may include making objects using the university's FabLab, technical writing about and rhetorical analysis of those objects, and website coding and design. Emphasizes student-led collaboration throughout iterative design cycles. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 3385. TOPICS IN RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION. 3 Hours.

Examines a topic in the history, theory, and practice of rhetoric and composition, such as digital rhetoric and composition, environmental rhetoric, history of writing instruction, rhetoric of science, and rhetoric of sound. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Prerequisites: C or better in ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302.

ENGL 4191. LITERATURE CONFERENCE COURSE. 1 Hour.

Requires permission of the department chair and the instructor.

ENGL 4301. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 3 Hours.

Examines the sounds and structure of the English language from pre-history to the present. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4311. EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Investigates the earliest literature and cultures of the peoples inhabiting the North American continent from prehistory to the end of the eighteenth century. May focus on oral and written narratives by Native Americans, Puritans, and/or other non-indigenous settlers who colonized the North American continent. Genres may include oral tales, letters, autobiography, fiction, poetry, drama, journalism, and/or scientific writing. Prerequisites: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4312. NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Covers American literature across the nineteenth century, including such literary topics as sentimental fiction, the American Renaissance, Gothic fiction, realism, and regionalism. The course may address various historical contexts, such as slavery and abolition, the Civil War, the women's rights movement, immigration and urbanization, and westward expansion and the frontier. Genres may include fiction, poetry, essays, autobiography, and letters. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4313. TWENTIETH- AND TWENTY-FIRST-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Examines literature written in the United States from the turn of the twentieth century to the present. Focuses on major figures and literary movements such as Realism, Modernism, and Postmodernism as they were shaped by historical, cultural, and political contexts including the World Wars, movements for civil rights, the Cold War, and globalization. Genres may include the novel, poetry, and drama, as well as emerging genres such as graphic fiction. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4321. MEDIEVAL LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Examines various aspects of Western literature from the fifth to the end of the fifteenth century. May focus on major figures and their cultural and historical contexts or on particular genres, themes, or topics. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4322. EARLY MODERN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Investigates Western European literature and culture of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. May focus on Petrarchan and anti-Petrarchan, Platonic and anti-Platonic poetry and essays; meditative poetry; epic poetry; drama by Shakespeare or his contemporaries; manuscript or coterie writing; women's writing; early scientific writing; or the relationship between literature and the arts. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4324. RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Examines literature from the 1660s through the end of the eighteenth century. Focuses on the tenets of Neoclassicism, the rise of the Enlightenment, and the emergence of Romanticism, expressed in genres that may include drama, coterie writing, satire, essays, journals and diaries, poetry, and epic works. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4325. CHAUCER. 3 Hours.

Examines the works of the fourteenth-century English poet Geoffrey Chaucer, their historical and cultural contexts, and his literary influences. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4326. SHAKESPEARE. 3 Hours.

Examines selected plays and poetry by Shakespeare in their historical, cultural, and literary contexts. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4328. J. R. R. TOLKIEN. 3 Hours.

Examines the mythology created in the fantasy writings of J. R. R. Tolkien, especially The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion, along with its roots in culture, history, language, literature, and religion. May cover some of Tolkien's lesser-known creative or critical texts as well as recent appropriations of Tolkien's work, such as in film, music, fan fiction, and gaming. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4330. TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING. 3 Hours.

A creative writing course that focuses on a topic spanning one or more literary genres. Topics may include flash fiction, memoir, narrative poetry, or speculative fiction. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and ENGL 3375.

ENGL 4331. BRITISH ROMANTICISM. 3 Hours.

Covers the British Romantic period (roughly 1789-1837), with special attention to the relationship between literature and culture. Genres may include lyric and epic poetry; novels and romances; essays and journals; science fiction and the Gothic. Topics may include nature and the imagination, science and industry, travel and empire, and revolutions in politics, culture, and the arts. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4332. THE VICTORIAN ERA. 3 Hours.

Covers the literature of Britain from 1837 to 1901, a period shaped by the literary movements of Realism and Naturalism. Genres may include the novel, poetry, drama, scientific writing, or essays. Focuses on major themes or issues in social, ethical, and aesthetic thought, such as Darwinism, democracy, class conflict, and empire. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4333. LITERARY GENRES. 3 Hours.

Examines one or more literary genres, such as the epistolary novel, the epic, the diary, or historical fiction. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4334. TOPICS IN BRITISH LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Concentrates on a topic, on a particular historical era, or on significant British authors. May address important themes, movements, regions, genres, or cross-cultural comparisons. Examples include country and city, the Bloomsbury Group, and Jane Austen. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4335. TOPICS IN NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURES. 3 Hours.

May focus on a period, women writers, film studies, transnational indigenous comparative studies, or a genre of written or oral literature. Topics may include the challenges of translation and mediation, as well as the identity politics of "Indian" authorship. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4336. TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Concentrates on a topic, on a particular historical era, or on one to three significant American authors. May address important themes, movements, regions, genres, or cross-cultural comparisons. Examples include work and the workplace, the Beat Generation, and Henry James and Edith Wharton. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4337. TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Concentrates on a topic, a genre, a particular historical era, a movement, or a group of significant authors in order to illuminate cross-cultural comparisons. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4338. TWENTIETH- AND TWENTY-FIRST-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Covers the literature of Britain, and possibly the Republic of Ireland, from the turn of the twentieth century. Focuses on major figures, literary movements, and the social and political developments that continue to preoccupy writers, such as women's rights, class conflict, and postcolonialism. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4339. TOPICS IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Concentrates on a topic or theme within the canon of African-American literature, such as a particular genre or era, significant authors, or a philosophical movement. Examples include the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil-Rights/Black-Power era, African-American autobiography, short fiction, and Afrofuturism. Offered as AAST 4339 and ENGL 4339; credit will be granted in only one department. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4340. TOPICS IN WOMEN'S WRITING. 3 Hours.

Focuses on women's writing in a particular genre or historical period or on a concept or issue of importance to women writers. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Offered as ENGL 4340 and WOMS 4340; credit will be granted in only one department. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4341. RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION: HISTORY, THEORY, AND PRACTICE I. 3 Hours.

Surveys the history of rhetorical theory and practice from their earliest formulations in Greek and Roman antiquity to the early modern period. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4342. RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION: HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE II. 3 Hours.

Surveys the history of rhetorical theory and practice from the early modern period to the present. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4344. TOPICS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDY. 3 Hours.

Examines texts primarily for their use of language or their engagement with linguistic issues. May include such topics as Old English, the emergence of the vernacular, literature and dialect, global English, or slang. May be repeated for credit when course content changes. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4345. TOPICS IN CRITICAL THEORY. 3 Hours.

May include the study of major figures (e.g., Agamben, Barthes, Derrida, Foucault, Heidegger, Levinas, Said, Spivak) or topics (e.g., aesthetics, digital technology, disability studies, feminist views of science, film theory). May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4346. TOPICS IN THEORIES OF LANGUAGE AND DISCOURSE. 3 Hours.

May include the study of a major theorist or a broader survey of related theories (e.g., discourse analysis; evolutionary theories of language and mind; integrational linguistics; speech-act theory) that investigate "language-in-general" and/or "language-in-use" and that question the limitations of these terms. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4347. ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION. 3 Hours.

A workshop-intensive course on writing fiction. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and ENGL 3375.

ENGL 4348. ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY. 3 Hours.

A workshop-intensive course on writing poetry. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and ENGL 3375.

ENGL 4349. ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING: CREATIVE NON-FICTION. 3 Hours.

A workshop-intensive course on writing creative non-fiction. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and ENGL 3375.

ENGL 4350. TOPICS IN FILM AND LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Studies film and the methods for comparing films to literary or other texts, considering them in relation to history, critical theory, and culture. May include such topics as ecohorror, adaptations of Shakespeare and/or Austen, or Native American cinema. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4355. LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY I. 3 Hours.

Examines classics of literary criticism from Greek antiquity through the nineteenth century, focusing on the nature, function, and history of criticism. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4356. LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY II. 3 Hours.

Examines twentieth-century and contemporary methodologies, such as New Criticism; formalism; structuralism; poststructuralism; hermeneutics; semiotics; reader response; psychoanalysis; Marxism; theories of gender, sexuality, and race; and cultural studies. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4365. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Examines literature for children, with attention to theoretical perspectives and cultural contexts. May present a history of the genre or focus on specific issues, such as gender, social class, disability, or the environment. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4366. YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Examines literature for young adults, with attention to theoretical perspectives and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4370. RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS. 3 Hours.

Surveys recent scholarship in rhetoric and composition as it applies to middle school and high school settings. Focuses on the development of reading and writing assignments, formative response to student writing, and assessment of student writing. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4371. ADVANCED ARGUMENTATION. 3 Hours.

Examines classical and contemporary theories of argumentation and applies them to academic and nonacademic writing. Assignments focus on the analysis and production of argumentative discourse in various forms (e.g., academic essays, advertising, editorials, political speeches, etc.). Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4375. TOPICS IN DIGITAL STUDIES. 3 Hours.

Advanced, theoretical work in digital studies in areas such as data analytics, social networking, videogame studies, or sound studies. May be repeated for credit when course content changes. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4377. TOPICS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Explores issues in the rhetorical, cultural, and aesthetic dimensions of science and technology. May include such topics as the medical humanities, speculative fiction, or theories of cultural spaces. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4385. MODERNISM. 3 Hours.

Covers major works of the early and mid-twentieth century in Europe and/or the Americas that belong to the movement known as Modernism. May also include the study of Freud and literature, Impressionism, Surrealism, and Existentialism. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4387. CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Examines contemporary literary movements and forms such as postmodernism, magical realism, dystopian fiction, and the graphic novel. Works may be from a single national tradition or several. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4390. INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH. 3 Hours.

Provides an opportunity to apply academic skills learned in English classes to practical situations by working in a business, government, or non-profit organization in a role related to the discipline. May be repeated once for credit if internship duties change. Prerequisite: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) and permission of instructor.

ENGL 4391. LITERATURE CONFERENCE COURSE. 3 Hours.

An independent study of a topic not otherwise available. Requires permission of the department chair and the instructor. May be repeated once for credit as long as the topics differ. Prerequisites: English majors must have earned a C or better in ENGL 2350 or must be concurrently enrolled in ENGL 2350. Non-majors must have earned a C or better in 6 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329) or an A in 3 hours of sophomore literature (ENGL 2303, ENGL 2309, ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329).

ENGL 4394. HONORS THESIS/SENIOR PROJECT. 3 Hours.

Required of all students in the University Honors College. During the senior year, the student must complete a thesis or project of equivalent difficulty under the direction of a faculty member in the major department.

ENGL 4399. SENIOR SEMINAR. 3 Hours.

Capstone course for English majors. A writing-intensive, seminar-style, in-depth study of a topic. Content may consist of a figure or figures, a period, a literary movement, a theme, or a critical theory. Offerings have included modern American poetry, Heidegger, existentialism, Negro expressionism, early modern manuscripts, race in science fiction, and American literature and animal studies. Prerequisites: C or better in ENGL 2350, ENGL 2384, and ENGL 3333 and completion of 18 hours of required 3000 - 4000 level English courses.

ENGL 5191. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1 Hour.

Supervised independent study at the M.A. or Ph.D. level.

ENGL 5300. THEORY AND PRACTICE IN ENGLISH STUDIES. 3 Hours.

Core graduate course, introduction to graduate study in English. Covers a wide range of methodological and theoretical approaches to, as well as current issues in, criticism, rhetoric, and literary studies. Enrollment requires the approval of the Graduate Advisor in English.

ENGL 5301. MEDIEVAL ENGLISH LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

English literature of the period before 1500. May include Old English poetry, Anglo-Latin prose, William Langland, the alliterative revival, romances, Malory, and Chaucer.

ENGL 5302. 16TH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Non-dramatic literature of the 16th century, including works by Thomas More, Sir Philip Sidney, Sir Walter Raleigh, John Skelton, Edmund Spenser, and Elizabeth I.

ENGL 5303. 17TH CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Poetry and prose of the 17th Century. May include a study of Milton and/or a study of writers and motifs of the period.

ENGL 5304. RESTORATION AND 18TH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Drama, poetry, fiction, and essays from 1660 to 1798. Includes writers such as John Dryden, Aphra Behn, Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson, Henry Mackenzie, Ignatio Sancho, and Maria Edgeworth, as well as issues of the period such as the nature of reason.

ENGL 5305. ROMANTIC BRITISH LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Poetry and fiction from 1798 to 1837. Includes writers such as William and Dorothy Wordsworth, Mary and Percy Shelley, Felicia Hemans, and Walter Scott, as well as issues such as the meaning of nature.

ENGL 5306. VICTORIAN ENGLISH LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Concepts and problems in texts by Victorian novelists, poets, and essayists (writers will vary). Attention to historical and cultural as well as literary issues.

ENGL 5307. 19TH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE AND CULTURE. 3 Hours.

An overview of the writings and culture of the long 19th century in Britain from 1798 to 1914. Makes connections between Romantic and Victorian periods, covers literary and other relations with the empire, and includes significant non-literary figures such as Darwin and Freud.

ENGL 5308. STUDIES IN SHAKESPEARE. 3 Hours.

Representative works of Shakespeare and contemporary Shakespeare criticism. May vary from comprehensive readings in the dramatic literature to intensive examination of certain plays, or to other related topics and plays of the period.

ENGL 5311. FOUNDATIONS OF RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION. 3 Hours.

An intellectual and institutional history of rhetoric and composition studies. Special attention will be given to the history and ethics of writing instruction; the importation of classical rhetoric into contemporary composition classrooms; the institutional formation of the field and its ambiguous status in the academy; and the major contemporary pedagogical approaches (e.g., expressivism, cognitivism, social constuctionism). May also address recent topics that have attracted the attention of the field (e.g., dialogism, institutional critique, plagiarism, post-process theory, service learning, writing across and beyond the curriculum).

ENGL 5313. 20TH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

A study of English and Irish writing in the 20th Century; may focus on major authors, themes, or topics.

ENGL 5320. EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Explores significant authors, texts, and movements within literary, historical, and cultural contexts. Writers examined may include established figures as well as noncanonical authors, and a range of topics and genres, such as Native American and comparative Indigenous literatures, Puritan writing, captivity narratives, early national literature, the rise of the novel, and autobiographical narrative.

ENGL 5322. 19TH CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Considers significant authors, texts, and movements within literary, historical, and cultural contexts. Writers examined may include established figures as well as noncanonical authors, and a range of topics and genres, such as the domestic novel, nineteenth-century American poetry, the American Renaissance, slave narratives, realism, and naturalism.

ENGL 5323. 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Explores significant authors, texts, and movements within literary, historical, and cultural contexts. Writers examined may include established figures as well as noncanonical authors, and a range of topics and genres, such as modern American poetry and fiction, the Harlem Renaissance, regionalism, the Beats, and post-war fiction.

ENGL 5324. TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERARY GENRES. 3 Hours.

Concentrates on a significant genre within American literary history. Genres examined may include, but are not limited to, poetry, fiction, autobiography, oral narratives, and American Gothic literature. May be repeated when content changes.

ENGL 5326. TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE BEFORE 1900. 3 Hours.

May focus on one to three writers such as Whitman and Dickinson, or Douglass, Stowe, and Melville, or a significant topic such as realism, African American literature, gender and sexuality, American literature and the environment, sentimental fiction, or women's writing. May be repeated when content changes.

ENGL 5327. TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE AFTER 1900. 3 Hours.

May focus on one to three writers such as Wharton, Faulkner, or Morrison, or a significant topic such as modernism and postmodernism, Mexican American literature, multicultural narrative, or feminist theory/feminist fiction. May be repeated when content changes.

ENGL 5330. TOPICS IN CRITICISM. 3 Hours.

Studies in critical topics such as textual criticism, psychoanalytic criticism, philosophy and criticism, Renaissance poetics and literature, critical movements, or focus on a major theorist in criticism. May be repeated when content changes.

ENGL 5331. TOPICS IN LANGUAGE OR DISCOURSE STUDIES. 3 Hours.

Concentration on historical and theoretical approaches to the study of language and the specific discursive practices of its users. May be repeated for credit when content changes.

ENGL 5337. SEMINAR IN TEACHING LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Study of recent scholarship in English Studies and other disciplines pertaining to the teaching of literature. Comparative analysis of methods and objectives for the teaching of literature. Course will include a practicum component in which students observe the teaching of experienced faculty, teach particular texts, design syllabi and write statements of teaching philosophy. The course is intended to prepare graduate students to teach literature courses at the university, college or community college level, and to provide a range of pedagogical models to enhance the skills of secondary school teachers.

ENGL 5340. CRITICAL THEORY: THE MAJOR TRADITIONAL TEXTS. 3 Hours.

A study of literary and cultural theory and practice from the Greco-Roman period to the early 20th Century. May include such theorists as Plato, Aristotle, Horace, Longinus, Dante, Sidney, B. Jonson, Dryden, Pope, Johnson, Coleridge, Arnold, Richards, Eliot, and others.

ENGL 5350. HISTORY OF RHETORIC I: CLASSICAL RHETORIC. 3 Hours.

A study of the theory and practice of Greco-Roman rhetoric from its pre-Socratic origins to the Second Sophistic. Attention will be given to major theorists, such as Gorgias, Protagoras, Plato, Aristotle, Isocrates, Hermagoras, Hermongenes, Cicero, Quintilian and the transitional figure of St. Augustine.

ENGL 5351. HISTORY OF RHETORIC II: MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE RHETORIC. 3 Hours.

A study of the theory and practice of western rhetoric from the early medieval period through the Renaissance. Attention will be given to major theorists, such as St. Augustine, Geoffrey of Vinsauf, Robert of Basevorn, Christine de Pizan, Desiderius Erasmus, Baldesar Castiglione, Juan Luis Vives, Sir Philip Sidney, Peter Ramus and Francis Bacon.

ENGL 5352. HISTORY OF RHETORIC III: MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY RHETORIC. 3 Hours.

A study of the theory and practice of western rhetoric from the 18th century to the present. Attention will be given to major theorists, such as Whatley, Blair, Bain, Campbell, Spencer, Richards, Burke, Weaver, Toulmin, Perelman, Bitzer, Vatz, Harriman, Leff, Farrell, McGee, Gaonkar, Kinneavy, Scott, Crosswhite, Meyer, Gross, Miller, Fuller and Kent.

ENGL 5355. STUDIES IN ENGLISH DISCOURSE. 3 Hours.

Analysis of English grammatical structures above the level of the clause, including the sentence, the paragraph, and the whole text; examination of the work of major discourse theorists Dik, Harris, Halliday, Longacre, Pike and van Dijk.

ENGL 5356. COMPOSING PROCESSES. 3 Hours.

Study of research about writing processes and examination of the available methods of conducting research; special attention given to major researchers and theorists.

ENGL 5357. READING PROCESSES. 3 Hours.

Contemporary theories of interpretation and empirical research into reading processes; special attention given to major researchers and theorists.

ENGL 5358. WRITING ASSESSMENT, EVALUATION, AND RESPONSE. 3 Hours.

Study of the methods and ethics of assessing, evaluating, and responding to the writing of students individually or collectively.

ENGL 5359. ARGUMENTATION THEORY. 3 Hours.

Emphasis on theories of argumentation and persuasion that further the rhetorical aims of convincing or achieving agreement through identification and consensus. Attention to classical and contemporary approaches to issue analysis, invention, audience analysis, building common ground, stasis theory, types of proofs and tests of validity, organizational strategies, and style. Special attention to argument on the Internet. Assignments may include constructing Web sites related to argument. Study of such theorists as Aristotle, Perelman, Toulmin, Ong, K. Burke, Brockreide and Ehninger, Bitzer, Young, Becker and Pike, and others.

ENGL 5360. CONTEMPORARY CRITICAL THEORY. 3 Hours.

Study of contemporary theories of interpretation, concentrating on one or more schools of critical and cultural theory may include, New Criticism, the Neo-Aristotelians, Marxist Critical Theory, Hermeneutics, psychoanalysis, Russian Formalism, semiotics, speech-act theory, phenomenology, structuralism, and post-structuralism. May be repeated when content changes.

ENGL 5370. SCHOLARLY ARGUMENT. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the research for the writing of argumentative scholarly essays. Surveys research skills, materials, forms of scholarly argument, and involves the writing of a research-based essay.

ENGL 5380. TEXTUAL THEORIES OF CULTURE. 3 Hours.

Study of the interpretations of culture yielded by the traditions of semiotics and hermeneutics and cultural studies may include works by the following: Lyotard, Foucault, Habermas, Derrida, Pierce, Barthes, Deleuze, Gadamer, Levi-Strauss, Butler, Haraway, and Hall.

ENGL 5388. GTA PREPARATION. 3 Hours.

ENGL 5389. TOPICS IN TEACHING COMPOSITION. 3 Hours.

Seminar for investigating problems of and approaches to teaching composition. Special attention given to current compositional theorists. May be repeated when content changes.

ENGL 5391. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 3 Hours.

Supervised independent study at the M.A. or Ph.D. level.

ENGL 5398. THESIS. 3 Hours.

The graduate student must be registered for this course (a) when in consultation over the thesis with the supervisory committee, and (b) in the semester or term in which the Master of Arts degree will be conferred.

ENGL 5698. THESIS. 6 Hours.

The graduate student must be registered for this course (a) when in consultation over the thesis with the supervisory committee, and (b) in the semester or term in which the Master of Arts degree will be conferred.

ENGL 5998. THESIS. 9 Hours.

The graduate student must be registered for this course (a) when in consultation over the thesis with the supervisory committee, and (b) in the semester or term in which the Master of Arts degree will be conferred.

ENGL 6191. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1 Hour.

Independent study at the M.A. or Ph.D. level. May be repeated as needed. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

ENGL 6329. TOPICS AND THEMES IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

The study of a theme or topic, such as primitivism, utopianism, representations of the unconscious, or the quest, within different literary traditions. May be repeated as content changes.

ENGL 6330. GENRE STUDIES IN BRITISH LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Intensive study of a genre in any period(s) of British Literature; may focus on autobiography, history of the novel, Restoration and eighteenth-century drama, nineteenth-century British fiction, or other. May be repeated when course content changes.

ENGL 6333. GENRES IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Theory of literary forms or types and the conventions they embody. May focus on the epic, the novel, lyric poetry, autobiography, drama, or magical realism, across different literary traditions. May be repeated as course content changes.

ENGL 6335. TOPICS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Focus on writers or issues in literature written in English, including colonial and postcolonial literatures. May include poetry, drama, fiction, or non-fiction. May be repeated when content changes.

ENGL 6339. TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Topics not bound by particular historical periods, for example, women's writing, canon formation, Native American and comparative Indigenous literatures, African American literature, Latina/o literature, utopian literature, science fiction, popular literature and culture, and queer literature. May be repeated when content changes.

ENGL 6340. METACRITICAL THEORY. 3 Hours.

A study of theories of literature from the point of view of their systems-theoretical character. Focuses on the writing of selected metatheorists such as Barbour, Braithwaite, Bruss, Harr, Lakotos, Popper, Rescher, and others, on questions of the genesis, nature, function, validity, and potential of literary theory. May be repeated for credit as course content changes.

ENGL 6350. TOPICS IN THE HISTORY AND THEORY OF RHETORIC. 3 Hours.

An intensive study of specific problems or issues in classical, medieval, Renaissance, modern, or contemporary rhetoric, (e.g., civic functions of rhetoric, logic and rhetoric, rhetoric of science, theories of invention), especially those that involve the connections and collisions between rhetoric and other intellectual traditions (e.g., critical theory, cultural studies, feminist theory, history, literary studies, non-western rhetoric, philosophy). May focus on the work of a major theorist. May be repeated for credit when content changes.

ENGL 6351. TOPICS IN COMPOSITION STUDIES. 3 Hours.

An intensive study of specific problems or issues in contemporary composition studies (e.g., authorship and intellectual property, computers and composition, the ideologies of writing instruction, the role of empirical research, service learning), especially those that involve connections and collisions between composition studies and other intellectual traditions (e.g., cognitive science, critical theory, cultural studies, feminist theory, hermeneutics, history, linguistics, literary study, rhetoric, philosophy, psychology, sociology). May focus on the work of a major researcher or theorist. May be repeated for credit when content changes.

ENGL 6360. TOPICS IN FEMINIST THEORY. 3 Hours.

Study of interdisciplinary feminist theories of language, power, knowledge, culture, identity, gender, and sexuality. Course may focus on Marxist feminism, postmodern/poststructuralist feminism, feminist cultural studies, postcolonial feminism, material feminisms, feminist science studies, queer theory, or other topics. Course may include such theorists as Wollstonecraft, Woolf, Beauvoir, Irigaray, Spillers, Spivak, Anzaldua, Bordo, Haraway, Butler, Grosz, Sedgwick, Wynter, and Halberstam.

ENGL 6370. TOPICS IN LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT. 3 Hours.

Introduces interdisciplinary theories and methods of the environmental humanities while investigating how literature, film, and other cultural texts, media, and practices represent and engage with the natural world. Topics may include animal studies, plant studies, food studies, environmental science studies, science fiction, environmental justice, post-humanism, extinction, climate change, and the anthropocene. May be repeated for credit when course content changes.

ENGL 6389. TECHNICAL WRITING ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES. 3 Hours.

Offers an integrated-language approach to technical writing across the disciplines designed to improve critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. Provides ESL-integrated feedback for writing projects. Focuses on writing research or grant proposals, but may also include writing abstracts, summaries, reports, and/or literature reviews. ENGL 6389 cannot be counted toward completing the requirements of any graduate degree plan in English.

ENGL 6391. GRADUATE READINGS. 3 Hours.

Supervised reading for the Ph.D. exam.

ENGL 6399. DISSERTATION. 3 Hours.

The graduate student must be registered for this course (a) when in consultation over the dissertation with the supervisory committee, and (b) in the semester or term in which the Ph.D. will be conferred. A minimum of 9 hours of dissertation credit is required for the Ph.D. Graduate teaching assistants must take ENGL 6699. ENGL 6999 must be taken during the final semester of the Ph.D.

ENGL 6691. GRADUATE READINGS. 6 Hours.

Independent Reading for the Comprehensive Exam.

ENGL 6699. DISSERTATION. 6 Hours.

The graduate student must be registered for this course (a) when in consultation over the dissertation with the supervisory committee, and (b) in the semester or term in which the Ph.D. will be conferred. A minimum of 9 hours of dissertation credit is required for the Ph.D. Graduate teaching assistants must take ENGL 6699. ENGL 6999 must be taken during the final semester of the Ph.D.

ENGL 6991. GRADUATE READINGS. 9 Hours.

Independent Reading for the Comprehensive Examination.

ENGL 6999. DISSERTATION. 9 Hours.

The graduate student must be registered for this course (a) when in consultation over the dissertation with the supervisory committee, and (b) in the semester or term in which the Ph.D. will be conferred. A minimum of 9 hours of dissertation credit is required for the Ph.D. Graduate teaching assistants must take ENGL 6699. ENGL 6999 must be taken during the final semester of the Ph.D.

ENGL 7399. DOCTORAL DEGREE COMPLETION. 3 Hours.

This course may be taken during the semester in which a student expects to complete all requirements for the doctoral degree and graduate. Enrolling in this course meets minimum enrollment requirements for graduation, for holding fellowships awarded by The Office of Graduate Studies and for full-time GTA or GRA positions. Students should verify that enrollment in this course meets other applicable enrollment requirements. To remain eligible in their final semester of study for grants, loans or other forms of financial aid administered by the Financial Aid Office must enroll in a minimum of 5 hours as required by the Office of Financial Aid. Other funding sources may also require more than 3-hours of enrollment. Additional hours may also be required to meet to requirements set by immigration law or by the policies of the student's degree program. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office, other sources of funding, Office of International Education and/or their graduate advisor to verify enrollment requirements before registering for this course. This course may only be taken once and may not be repeated. Students who do not complete all graduation requirements while enrolled in this course must enroll in a minimum of 6 dissertation hours (6699 or 6999) in their graduation term. Graded P/F/R.

Faculty

Kevin Porter
Chair and Associate Professor

Stacy Alaimo
Professor

Timothy Morris
Professor

Jacqueline Fay
Associate Professor

Luanne Frank
Associate Professor

Desiree Henderson
Associate Professor

Penelope Ingram
Associate Professor

Neill Matheson
Associate Professor

Cedrick May
Associate Professor

Timothy Richardson
Associate Professor

Amy Tigner
Associate Professor

James Warren
Associate Professor

Estee Beck
Assistant Professor

Paul Conrad
Assistant Professor

Erin Murrah-Mandril
Assistant Professor

Kenton Rambsy
Assistant Professor

Rechelle Christie
Assistant Professor of Practice

Amy Bernhard
Senior Lecturer

Joanna Johnson
Senior Lecturer

Laura Kopchick
Senior Lecturer

Peggy Kulesz
Senior Lecturer

Gyde Martin
Senior Lecturer

Ana Savić
Senior Lecturer

Kathryn Warren
Senior Lecturer

Christian Worlow
Senior Lecturer