School of Social Work

Overview

The School of Social Work (SSW) has a long, well established history at UT Arlington.  Initially, beginning in 1967, only the MSW degree was offered. In 1979, The Bachelors of Social Work (BSW) degree was founded but under the auspices of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work. The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Social Work degree program was initiated in 1983.  On September 1, 1991, the graduate and undergraduate programs were brought together into a unified administrative and academic unit, the School of Social Work.

The School now has a diverse student body of over 1,800 students enrolled in three degree programs: the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW), Master of Social Work (MSW), and the Ph.D. in social work. The BSW and MSW programs are fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

With a commitment to social justice, the School is also home to the diversity certificate and minor programs, where undergraduate students across the UT Arlington campus can enroll in a cluster of courses to earn a certificate or minor in diversity, and is home to the Center for African American Studies where students can minor in African American studies.

The MSW program is offered in a variety of settings including the main UT Arlington campus, the UT Arlington Fort Worth campus, fully online, and through joint programs at Lubbock Christian University and Angelo State University.

In the BSW program, we prepare students for a wide range of entry level, generalist practice, social service positions. In the MSW program students prepare for advanced level positions with specializations in either direct clinical practice with families and children, mental health and substance abuse, aging, or health, or in community and administrative practice. In the Ph.D. program students are prepared for positions in academia where they can teach and continue research in areas of importance to the social work profession. All three programs offer challenging courses, internships, and practicums designed to teach practice knowledge and skills while instilling the value orientations of the profession.

Mission and Philosophy

The School of Social Work (SSW) strives to educate leaders to create community partnerships for promoting a just society. The School promotes the highest standards of integrity and excellence in research, teaching and service, and creates collaborative scholarly and educational opportunities for students and the community, with the goal of achieving a just society.

The SSW has identified several broad program objectives: engaging in evidence-informed research, teaching and practice, preparing students to assume leadership roles and activities in the local community and beyond, and to conduct community-based research to address complex and pressing social issues at the local, national and global levels.

Office of Advising and Student Success

To help students in the SSW reach their graduation goals we established the office of advising and student success. Through this office students receive timely and accurate professional and academic advising, connection to the larger campus, and referrals to additional services to facilitate academic achievement. Students can also receive writing resource support in the form of individual appointments, group presentations, and online resources.  For more information Contact the Office of Student Success at (817) 272-3647.

Scholastic Activity and Research Interests of the Faculty

In the SSW there are four research centers: the Birmingham Center for Child Welfare, the Center for Addictions & Recovery Studies (CARS), the Center for Clinical Social Work, (CCSW) and the Center for Advocacy, Nonprofits & Donor Organizations (CAN-DO). In addition, the Innovative Community-Academic Partnership (iCAP) program provides pilot funding and support for highly competitive, nationally reviewed collaborative research with community agency partners. The centers and iCAP offer training, research, and service opportunities to faculty and students.

Our faculty are outstanding scholars and teachers in the domains of child welfare, family violence, health, mental health, aging and disability and are active in developing new knowledge in their respective fields, producing significant numbers of peer-reviewed journal articles, books, and book chapters each year.

Research produced by faculty has generated not only new knowledge, but also intervention outcomes that have garnered national attention and recognition, with a number of faculty members serving either as editors-in-chief of peer-reviewed journals, or as members of editorial review boards.

The School also offers continuing education for social work practitioners and other human service professionals through the Professional Development Program. Topics include ethics, mental health, child welfare, administration, supervision, licensing, and more, all taught by experts in their respective fields.

Courses

AAST 2300. INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the African American experience in the United States, including an interdisciplinary analysis of the African American experience in politics, the arts, folklore, religion, economics, sociology, psychology, and community development; and an examination of local history, contemporary issues, and recent events in the African American community.

AAST 2337. ECONOMICS OF SOCIAL ISSUES. 3 Hours.

Economic consequences and solutions of current social issues. Each semester, a series of topics will be covered in line with current events and the instructor's expertise to facilitate an understanding of the economic structure. Will not serve to meet degree requirements for College of Business Administration majors. Offered as AAST 2337 and ECON 2337; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 3300. TOPICS IN WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES. 3 Hours.

Special topics of interest in the disciplines of Women's and Gender Studies. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Also offered as WOMS 3300; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 3301. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT: THEORIES OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR. 3 Hours.

This course explores, within the context of a strengths and empowerment perspective, theories of human behavior. For social work majors, it is strongly recommended that SOCW 3302 be taken before this course. Offered as AAST 3301 and SOCW 3301; credit will be granted in only one department. This course is required for Social Work Field Instruction and Seminar I (SOCW 4951).

AAST 3317. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND DIVERSE POPULATIONS. 3 Hours.

Introduction to theoretical, practical, and policy issues related to diverse populations. Historical, political, and socioeconomic forces are examined that maintain discriminatory and oppressive values, attitudes, and behaviors in society and in all levels of organizational behavior. This course is required for admission to the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) program. Offered as AAST 3317, SOCW 3317 and MAS 3319; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 3324. THE COMING OF THE CIVIL WAR, 1820-1860. 3 Hours.

Sectional conflict in the United States from the Missouri Compromise of 1820 to the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860. Southern separatism, slavery as a political issue, the antislavery movement, the breakup of the national political system, and the failure of sectional compromise. Offered as AAST 3324 and HIST 3324; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 3327. THE NEW SOUTH, 1863-PRESENT. 3 Hours.

From military defeat to Sun Belt growth. Topics include Reconstruction, segregation, migration of Southerners to the North and West, depressions, reforms, Civil Rights, Moral Majority, cultural expressions in literature and music. Offered as AAST 3327 and HIST 3327; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 3330. CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND IDENTITY. 3 Hours.

The ways identity is constructed in contemporary societies in an increasingly complex and multicultural world. Ethnic, racial, gender, and class identities. How and when identity is asserted and assigned, and how it can both draw boundaries and forge ties between peoples. Formerly listed as ANTH 2350. Credit cannot be given for both ANTH 2350 and ANTH 3330. Also listed as MAS 3330; credit cannot be granted for both ANTH 3330 and MAS 3330. Offered as AAST 3330 and ANTH 3330; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 3332. COMPARATIVE KINSHIP AND FAMILY SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

Variation in kinship and family systems from crosscultural and evolutionary perspectives. Structure, function, and dynamics of kinship and family systems as adaptations to diverse ecological, social, and historical circumstances. Implications of this approach for understanding kinship and family in American society also addressed. Formerly listed as ANTH 4338. Credit cannot be given for both ANTH 3338 and ANTH 4338. Also offered as WOMS 3338; credit will be granted only once. Offered as AAST 3332 and ANTH 3338; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 3336. SOCIAL INEQUALITY. 3 Hours.

Examines the processes, characteristics, and consequences of social inequality in society. Topics include the social class structure, status groups, and elite power structure as they influence people's life chances. Offered as AAST 3336 and SOCI 3336; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 3337. RACIAL & ETHNIC GROUPS IN US. 3 Hours.

Compares the immigration, acculturation, and adjustment processes of various racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. Examines historical and contemporary discrimination in relation to the social conditions of racial/ethnic minority groups in the U. S. Topics include classical and contemporary theory; individualistic, cultural, and structural arguments about social arrangements; and conflict among majority and minority groups. Offered as AAST 3337, MAS 3337, and SOCI 3337; credit will be granted in only one department. Credit will not be granted for both SOCI 3337 and SOCI 4310 or for MAS 3337 and MAS 4310. Prerequisite: SOCI 1311 or permission of instructor.

AAST 3338. CONTEMPORARY BLACK EXPERIENCE. 3 Hours.

An overview of recent research concerning the African American experience in the post-civil rights era. Topics include explanations for racial differences across spheres of society such as income, education, and occupation; the debate over race versus social class; the persistence of racial discrimination; and emerging disputes within the black community regarding "what it means to be black." Offered as AAST 3338 and SOCI 3338; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 3339. RACE, SPORT AND MEDIA. 3 Hours.

The media, including television, film, print, audio, and online outlets, influence how we view the world. This course analyzes overt, subtle and subliminal messages about culture, race, ethnicity, and sport as presented to us through various forms of the media. Through examinations of media portrayals of race, both past and present, students will analyze media artifacts, identify recurring themes, and examine research focused on the societal effects of stereotypical media portrayals. Offered as AAST 3339 and SOCI 3339; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 3344. SOCIOLOGY OF THE 1960S. 3 Hours.

This course presents a sociological analysis of the sixties, stressing the connection between grassroots mobilization and large structures of power, war, race and gender. The legacy of the sixties is examined through stories told by and about activists of the period. Parallels between the sixties and the present are identified. Movements covered may include civil rights, black power, anti-war and women's rights. Offered as AAST 3344 and SOCI 3345; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 3345. AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE. 3 Hours.

Offers an introduction to African American literature or focuses on a particular genre, period or topic. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Offered as AAST 3345 and ENG 3345; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 3347. TOPICS IN MULTICULTURAL LITERATURES. 3 Hours.

Either an intensive focus within one tradition or a comparison between two or more traditions. Topics may include Asian-American literature, the American Indian novel, the Harlem Renaissance, Jewish-American literature, Mexican-American and American Indian literatures, or African American literature. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Offered as ENGL 3347, AAST 3347, and MAS 3347; credit will be granted in only one department, and credit for MAS 3347 will be granted only once. Prerequisite: For English majors, ENGL 2350; for non-majors, 6 hours of sophomore literature or 3 hours of sophomore with a grade of A.

AAST 3353. SOCIAL CLIMATE OF CITIES. 3 Hours.

A comparative study of urban communities and metropolitan areas in terms of their distinctive social life and culture. Topics touching on power and urban politics, race and ethnic relations, poverty, and leisure and lifestyles will be examined in terms of their contribution to the unique social climate of cities. Offered as AAST 3353 and SOCI 3353; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 3365. AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865. 3 Hours.

History of blacks in America from their African origins to 1865. Emphasis on early African society, American slavery, and the development of black institutions and culture in the U.S. Offered as AAST 3365 and HIST 3365; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 3366. AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 1865-PRESENT. 3 Hours.

Emphasis on the transition from slavery to freedom, the political, social, and economic status of blacks in the late 19th century, 20th century black institutions and culture, and the evolution of the civil rights movements. Offered as AAST 3366 and HIST 3366; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 3380. RACE, CRIME, AND JUSTICE. 3 Hours.

An examination of race in the context of the criminal justice system. Emphasis is on social construction of crime; and the treatment of racial minorities as victims and offenders by law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Offered as CRCJ 3380 and MAS 3380; credit will be granted only once. Offered as AAST 3380 and CRCJ 3380; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 4317. ETHNIC GROUP POLITICS IN THE UNITED STATES. 3 Hours.

The influence of selected major ethnic groups with special attention given to organizational development, participation in political parties, leadership, ideology, immigration policy, current issues, and relations with the dominant culture and other ethnic groups. Offered as AAST 4317 and POLS 4317; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 4318. POLITICS OF AFRICAN AMERICANS. 3 Hours.

The influence of African-American politics on United States government and policies with special attention given to organizational development, participation in political parties, leadership, ideology, the Civil Rights movement, current issues, and relations with other ethnic groups. Offered as AAST 4318 and POLS 4318; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 4326. DIVERSITY IN ORGANIZATIONS. 3 Hours.

This course examines the implications of employee diversity in organizations, an issue of increasing importance. It includes study of the changing demographics of workers, including multiple demographic groups and areas of difference important to organizational treatment and outcomes. This course examines research on treatment, access, and customer discrimination. Legislation related to diversity is also reviewed. This course also provides suggestions for individuals and organizations to increase opportunities and outcomes for workers of all backgrounds. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

AAST 4331. RACE, ETHNICITY & FAMILY FORMATION. 3 Hours.

Investigates the ways in which cultural understandings of race and ethnicity have shaped historical and contemporary variations in family structure, familial experiences, and the legal possibilities for family formation. Junior standing (60 hours) or permission of the instructor required to enroll in this course. Offered as AAST 4331 and SOCI 4331; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 4341. INEQUALITIES IN PUBLIC EDUCATION. 3 Hours.

This course examines the manner in which race, ethnicity, and class affect the quality of education in the public schools. Topics include the resegregation of schools, class and race based achievement and funding gaps, and the role the schools play in reproducing inequality. This course has a service learning component and requires volunteering in programs designed to reduce inequality in the schools. Offered as AAST 4341 and SOCI 4341; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 4342. TOPICS IN CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Selected topics, to include anthropological theory, population and cultural ecology, semiotics, and humanistic anthropology. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission. Also offered as ANTH 4342. Credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 4350. SPECIAL TOPICS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES. 3 Hours.

Special topics related to African American studies. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

AAST 4370. AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE WEST. 3 Hours.

A history of African Americans in the West, focusing on the experiences of the first Africans who accompanied the first European explorers in the West and Southwest; the post-Civil War migration and settlement of African Americans in the West in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; and the development and impact of the "West Coast" experience on African American culture. Offered as AAST 4370 and HIST 4370; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 4374. AFRICAN HISTORY I. 3 Hours.

Examines African prehistory, ancient civilizations, religion, gender issues, slavery, and commerce in precolonial Africa. Offered as AAST 4374 and HIST 4374; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 4375. AFRICAN HISTORY II. 3 Hours.

Africa from the "Scramble for Africa" through the establishment of the various colonial systems, through the beginnings of African nationalism, to the contemporary period. The African Revolution and the development of the independent African states. Offered as AAST 4375 and HIST 4375; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 4376. AFRICAN DIASPORA I. 3 Hours.

The major developments which have shaped the history of Africans and their descendants in the Atlantic, Mediterranean, and Indian Ocean areas from the earliest times to 1800. Emphasis on the comparative history of Black Diasporic communities; linkages between Africans and their descendants in the Diaspora. Offered as AAST 4376 and HIST 4376; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 4377. AFRICAN DIASPORA II. 3 Hours.

The major developments which have shaped the history of Africans and their descendants in Latin America, the Caribbean, and North America since 1800. Emphasis on the comparative history of Black Diasporic communities; linkages between Africans and their descendants in the Atlantic Diaspora. Offered as AAST 4377 and HIST 4377; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 4378. WEST AFRICA AND THE ATLANTIC DIASPORA. 3 Hours.

This course examines the history of West Africa and how this region was integrated into the Atlantic world through the Atlantic slave trade. The course adopts an interdisciplinary approach that integrates traditional classroom instruction with field-based learning in West Africa. This learning method, combined with cultural immersion, challenges students to develop their academic and cross-cultural knowledge and skills. Offered as AAST 4378 and HIST 4378; credit will be granted in only one department.

AAST 4391. CONFERENCE COURSE. 3 Hours.

Directed independent study for the advanced undergraduate. A close examination of a chosen topic through research and/or reading; format designed by instructor and student. May be repeated for a maximum six credit hours when the subject matter varies. Prerequisite: Departmental permission.

AAST 4399. CAPSTONE AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES. 3 Hours.

In consultation with the course instructor, students will design a research project or an internship that will integrate their previous course work into a capstone experience in either the applied or the cultural studies stream of the African American Studies minor. Prerequisite: AAST 2300 and departmental permission.

AAST 6391. Conference Course. 3 Hours.

Directed independent study for a masters-level or doctoral student. A close examination of a chosen topic through research and/or reading; format designed by instructor and student. May be repeated for maximum six credit hours when the subject matter varies. Prerequisite: Permission from CAAS Director.

Courses

SOCW 2311. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK. 3 Hours. (TCCN = SOCW 2361)

An overview of the social work profession, its fields of practice, methods of social intervention, its historical context, and its relationship to the social welfare system. This course is required for admission to the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) program.

SOCW 2313. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE I. 3 Hours.

Critical evaluation of the value base of the social work profession and basic practice concepts including interviewing, communication and problem solving skills at the individual, family, and group levels in diverse settings. This course is required for admission to the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) program. Prerequisite: SOCW 2311. Prospective BSW majors only.

SOCW 2325. SOCIAL WORK STATISTICS. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to enhance students' skills as research consumers and in performing research and statistical analyses in social work and social science. Included in the course are descriptive statistical procedures including measures of central tendency, variability, shape and distribution along with associations between two variables. In addition, inferential statistics are covered including estimation and hypothesis testing.

SOCW 3301. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT: THEORIES OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR. 3 Hours.

This course explores, within the context of a strengths and empowerment perspective, theories of human behavior. For social work majors, it is strongly recommended that SOCW 3302 be taken before this course. Offered as AAST 3301 and SOCW 3301; credit will be granted in only one department. This course is required for Social Work Field Instruction and Seminar I (SOCW 4951).

SOCW 3302. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT: LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT. 3 Hours.

This course explores, within the context of a strengths and empowerment based perspective, the bio-psycho-social development of persons from birth to death. It is strongly recommended that this course be taken before SOCW 3301. This course is required for Social Work Field Instruction and Seminar I (SOCW 4951).

SOCW 3303. SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY AND SERVICES. 3 Hours.

Examines how social goals are met by social welfare institutions. Conceptual schemes are developed for analyzing the structure of social welfare institutions and evaluating social welfare sub-systems. The social work profession is also examined in the context of the evolution and function of the contemporary American social welfare system. This course is required for Social Work Field Instruction and Seminar II (SOCW 4952). Prerequisite: SOCW 2311. Prospective BSW majors and BSW majors only.

SOCW 3304. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE II. 3 Hours.

Theories and methodologies of social work assessment, case management, and other generalist intervention at the individual, family, and group levels in diverse settings. This course is required for Social Work Field Instruction and Seminar I (SOCW 4951). Prerequisite: SOCW 2311, SOCW 2313, SOCW 3301, and SOCW 3302. BSW majors only.

SOCW 3305. SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH METHODS. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with the fundamental skills to understand, use, and conduct research to advance the knowledge base of the social work profession and assess the effectiveness of social work interventions in generalist social work practice. The course addresses elements of the research process, quantitative and qualitative methods, research ethics, and approaches to data analysis. Particular attention will be given to the role of research with populations-at-risk, social and economic justice, and cultural diversity. Prerequisite: SOCW 2311; and MATH 1308, SOCW 2325, or SOCI 3352. BSW majors only.

SOCW 3306. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE III: MACRO PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

The theory and practice of social change at the community level, including a sociological analysis of bureaucracies as collectivities of power, and of the community as a social phenomenon. Three models of community organization--community development, social action, and social planning--will be emphasized including methods of resource delivery and redistribution. This course is required for Social Work Field Instruction and Seminar II (SOCW 4952). Prerequisite: SOCW 2311, SOCW 2313, and SOCW 3301. BSW majors only.

SOCW 3317. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND DIVERSE POPULATIONS. 3 Hours.

Introduction to theoretical, practical, and policy issues related to diverse populations. Historical, political, and socioeconomic forces are examined that maintain discriminatory and oppressive values, attitudes, and behaviors in society and in all levels of organizational behavior. This course is required for admission to the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) program. Offered as AAST 3317, SOCW 3317 and MAS 3319; credit will be granted in only one department.

SOCW 4191. CONFERENCE COURSE. 1 Hour.

Topics assigned on an individual basis covering personal research or study in designated areas. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

SOCW 4291. CONFERENCE COURSE. 2 Hours.

Topics assigned on an individual basis covering personal research or study in designated areas. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

SOCW 4310. SOCIAL WORK WITH CHILDREN AND FAMILIES. 3 Hours.

A critical examination of social policies, research, and practices impacting at-risk children and families in child welfare, child mental health, and school settings. Emphasis is placed on the role of the social work practitioner in enhancing the well-being of children and families in contemporary society. Prerequisite: SOCW 3301, SOCW 3302, and SOCW 3304. BSW majors only.

SOCW 4311. SEMINAR IN GENDER ISSUES. 3 Hours.

Explores women's issues in human behavior theory, practice theory, and policy. The historical, political, and socioeconomic forces that maintain sexism are discussed. Environmental influences are examined in relation to social justice, social work values, knowledge, and skills. This course is also offered as SOCW 6310 in the MSW program. Prerequisite: SOCW 3301, SOCW 3302, and SOCW 3317.

SOCW 4320. PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS. 3 Hours.

Explores theoretical and empirical data on diverse personal relationships at the follow stages of relationship: initiation, maintenance, and termination. Identifies areas for intervention. Also offered as SOCW 6320 in the MSW program. Prerequisite: SOCW 3301, SOCW 3302, and SOCW 3317.

SOCW 4329. FORENSIC SOCIAL WORK. 3 Hours.

This course develops the understanding of the role of social workers with clients within the criminal justice system and the legal system. This course will focus on theory, intervention, and advocacy with diverse forensic populations including juveniles, adults, people accused of crimes, victims of crimes, and related systems. Forensic practice in family and social services, juvenile justice and criminal justice, child welfare, and mental health and substance abuse will be explored. This course assumes a justice oriented multisystems and interdisciplinary approach. Also offered as SOCW 6329 in the MSW program. Prerequisite: SOCW 2313, SOCW 3301, SOCW 3302, SOCW 3304, and SOCW 3317.

SOCW 4333. AGING IN AMERICAN SOCIETY. 3 Hours.

This course presents the major theories of aging, in the United States and across cultures, and explores the diverse factors of aging from various perspectives including psychological, biological, sociological, and spiritual. Theories are integrated into practice thus providing students a sound foundation for social work practice with older adults. Students develop skills for completing multi-dimensional assessments, and effective social work interventions with and on behalf of older adults. This is offered at the MSW level as SOCW 6333. Prerequisite: SOCW 3301, SOCW 3302, and SOCW 3317.

SOCW 4350. SPECIAL ISSUES IN SOCIAL WORK. 3 Hours.

Relevant social work topics generated and explored in depth according to student and professional needs. The topic will be determined prior to registration. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

SOCW 4391. CONFERENCE COURSE. 3 Hours.

Topics assigned on an individual basis covering personal research or study in designated areas. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

SOCW 4951. SOCIAL WORK FIELD INSTRUCTION AND SEMINAR I. 9 Hours.

Supervised social work experience in a human service agency where students will integrate generalist practice concepts into professional practice experiences. Requires a minimum of 240 clock hours in the agency. An additional two hours a week are spent in a classroom seminar to integrate of social work knowledge, theory, and skills learned in the classroom with practical application in a social work setting. For additional information and requirements, see the BSW Field Policies and Procedures Manual. Prerequisite: SOCW 3301, SOCW 3302, SOCW 3304. BSW Majors Only.

SOCW 4952. SOCIAL WORK FIELD INSTRUCTION AND SEMINAR II. 9 Hours.

Supervised social work experience in a human service agency where students will integrate generalist practice concepts into professional practice experiences. Requires a minimum of 240 clock hours in the agency. An additional 2 hours a week are spent in a classroom seminar to integrate of social work knowledge, theory, and skills learned in the classroom with practical application in a social work setting. For additional information and requirements, see the BSW Field Policies and Procedures Manual. Prerequisite: SOCW 3301, SOCW 3302, SOCW 3303, SOCW 3304, and SOCW 3306. This course must be taken in the semester immediately following SOCW 4951 or concurrently with it if completing a Block placement. BSW majors only.

SOCW 4953. SOCIAL WORK FIELD INSTRUCTION AND SEMINAR I: TITLE IV-E PROGRAM. 9 Hours.

Integration of theory and practice, based primarily on field instruction experiences. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Title IV-E program; Co-requisite: SOCW 4954.

SOCW 4954. SOCIAL WORK FIELD INSTRUCTION AND SEMINAR II: TITLE IV-E PROGRAM. 9 Hours.

Integration of theory and practice, based primarily on field instruction experiences. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Title IV-E program; Co-requisite: SOCW 4953.

SOCW 5252. APPLIED SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE I-SPLIT II. 2 Hours.

Practical internship experience in the field with a social work agency. Course hours are completed by contacting the agency you are assigned to. Please contact the Field Office for more information. Students must complete 240 hours in the field. Prerequisite: SOCW 5651.

SOCW 5301. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I. 3 Hours.

Exploration of behavioral and social science knowledge of human behavior and development through the life course. Examines major systems in society: individual, group, family, and community; and the diversity of ethnicity, race, class, sexual orientation, and culture.

SOCW 5303. FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIAL POLICY AND SERVICES. 3 Hours.

Examines how social goals are met by social welfare institutions. Conceptual schemes are developed for analyzing the structure of social welfare institutions and evaluating social welfare sub-systems. The social work profession also is examined in the context of the evolution and function of the contemporary American social welfare system.

SOCW 5304. GENERALIST MICRO PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

This foundation level course introduces graduate students to both theory and methods for social work practice with individuals, families, and small groups. It emphasizes a generalist perspective, beginning interviewing and relationship skills, problem assessment, goal setting, and contracting. Special attention is given to the common roles assumed by social workers (e.g. facilitator, broker, advocate).

SOCW 5306. GENERALIST MACRO PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Examines generalist community and administrative practice roles, the perspectives of strengths, empowerment, evidence-based practice, and global practice along with the values of social justice, diversity, and participation. Specific attention is given to assessing community assets and needs.

SOCW 5310. MICRO AND MACRO PRACTICE FIELD SEMINAR. 3 Hours.

Integration of social work knowledge, theory, and skills learned in the classroom with practical application in social work setting. Prerequisite: SOCW 5301, SOCW 5304, SOCW 5306, and concurrent enrollment in SOCW 5551.

SOCW 5317. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND DIVERSE POPULATIONS. 3 Hours.

Introduction to theoretical, practical, and policy issues related to race, ethnicity, and women. Historical, political, and socioeconomic forces are examined that maintain racist and sexist values, attitudes, and behaviors in society and all levels of organizational behavior. The importance and contribution of globalization, social justice and diversity are explored.

SOCW 5322. RESEARCH AND EVALUATION METHODS IN SOCIAL WORK I. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of and ability to use the evidence-informed practice process to identify, analyze and apply evidence-informed interventions. Students will be able to comprehend both quantitative and qualitative research and to synthesize strengths and weaknesses of the social work literature. Students will be able to synthesize and evaluate research in terms of its content, quality, and applicability to clients. Students will understand scientific and ethical approaches to building knowledge to apply to and evaluate the impact of interventions on clients or clients' presenting problems.

SOCW 5651. APPLIED SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE I-SPLIT I. 6 Hours.

Practical internship experience in the field with a social work agency. Course hours are completed by contacting the agency you are assigned to. Please contact the Field Office for more information. This is a split placement: students will complete 240 hours in the Field and will attend a required 2 hour weekly seminar. Prerequisite: SOCW 5301, SOCW 5304, SOCW 5306.

SOCW 5851. APPLIED SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE I-BLOCK. 8 Hours.

Practical internship experience in the field with a social work agency. Course hours are completed by contacting the agency you are assigned to. Please contact the Field Office for more information. This is a block placement: students will complete 480 hours in the field and will attend a weekly 2 hour seminar. Prerequisite: SOCW 5301, SOCW 5304, SOCW 5306.

SOCW 6190. TUTORIAL. 1 Hour.

Arrangements may be made for a directed and supervised tutorial in a select area of special interest to the student.

SOCW 6301. ADVOCACY AND SOCIAL POLICY. 3 Hours.

Politics are key to developing social policy. Students learn theory and skills to impact social and distributive justice at local, state and national levels. Examines the role of the social work profession in politics. Prerequisite: SOCW 5303.

SOCW 6303. POVERTY, INEQUALITY AND SOCIAL POLICY. 3 Hours.

This course examines the nature and extent of poverty and inequality in the United States, their causes and consequences, and the debate concerning the role of government in providing anti-poverty programs. Many points of view concerning social and distributive justice are presented, from the radical left to radical right. Prerequisite: SOCW 5303.

SOCW 6304. SOCIAL POLICY AND CHILD WELFARE. 3 Hours.

Examination of current policies, programs, and practices. Attention given to new perspectives on the delivery system and staffing in child welfare. Through analysis and research, students are provided knowledge for more effective practice in the field of child welfare. Prerequisite: SOCW 5303.

SOCW 6305. INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR. 3 Hours.

Focuses on issues and aspects of practice of broad concern to the profession of social work. Faculty members serve as consultants and resource persons to seminar members. Required of all non-thesis students in their final semester of coursework. Grade of C or better must be earned in this seminar to pass. If this requirement is not met, the student must repeat the course. Milestone: all courses have been taken for the degree except those left in the last semester, including this course. If fall or spring, no more than 15 hours can be left; if summer, no more than 12 hours can be left. Prerequisite: SOCW 6451 or SOCW 6851.

SOCW 6310. SEMINAR IN GENDER ISSUES. 3 Hours.

Explores women's issues in human behavior theory, practice theory, and policy. The historical, political, and socioeconomic forces that maintain sexism are discussed. Environmental influences are examined in relation to social justice, social work values, knowledge, and skills. This course is also offered as SOCW 4311 in the BSW Program. Prerequisite: SOCW 5301, SOCW 5317.

SOCW 6311. SEMINAR IN DIRECT METHODS IN COUPLES COUNSELING. 3 Hours.

Examination of various psychological, social, and cognitive-behavioral treatment approaches to problems in intimate coupling. Emphasis is placed on the assessment of the sources and patterns of dissatisfaction and conflict, the selection and ordering of treatment strategies, and application of treatment techniques consistent with determined goals. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6312. GROUP DYNAMICS I AND SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Examines contemporary social-psychological concepts and small group research, with a view to testing their applicability to practice propositions and operational principles, in work with both task and personality satisfaction groups. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6314. ADVANCED ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Focuses on selected topics, issues, and skills for effective social work administration. Content includes leadership, worker motivation, resource development, interagency relations and managing conflict and diversity in a climate of scarce resources. Prerequisite: SOCW 6371 or concurrent enrollment.

SOCW 6315. ADVANCED COMMUNITY PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Focuses on topics, issues, and skills for mobilizing neighborhoods, communities, and client groups to solve collective human problems. Content includes the politics of empowerment, mobilizing coalitions, locating resources, and mediating conflict. Prerequisite: SOCW 6371 or concurrent enrollment.

SOCW 6317. DIRECT PRACTICE IN HEALTH CARE. 3 Hours.

Explores the central contribution of social work to comprehensive health care and health in environment theory and evidence; advanced knowledge and skills in human behavior theory relevant to health care, as well as social work interventions to assess and ameliorate the psychological effects of illness and disability, are included along with emerging roles for social work in prevention and health maintenance. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6318. DIRECT PRACTICE WITH AGING. 3 Hours.

Course presents an overview of current issues in the care, treatment, and delivery of social services to the aging. Students learn practice procedures designed to equip them with the skills needed for effective social work practice and review major theories on aging. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6319. SOCIAL POLICY AND MENTAL HEALTH. 3 Hours.

Studies programs and policies in the field of mental health. An analytical model is employed in the process of examining critical issues in the mental health arena. Prerequisite: SOCW 5303.

SOCW 6320. PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS. 3 Hours.

Explores theoretical and empirical data on diverse personal relationships at the follow stages of relationship: initiation, maintenance, and termination. Identifies areas for intervention. This course is also offered as SOCW 4320 in the BSW Program. Prerequisite: SOCW 5301 and SOCW 5317.

SOCW 6324. RESEARCH AND EVALUATION METHODS IN SOCIAL WORK II. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of and ability to analyze, monitor, and evaluate evidence informed interventions and human service programs. In this course quantitative and qualitative research methods and approaches are applied to the scientific and ethical evaluation of evidence informed interventions and human service programs. Research skills and knowledge are presented from the perspective of promoting diversity and social and economic justice in the evaluation of social work. Prerequisite: SOCW 5322 or advanced standing status.

SOCW 6325. ADVANCED MICRO PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Builds on the generalist perspective and the basic familiarity with social work processes (such as problem identification, assessment, contracting, plan implementation, and outcome evaluation) in the context of (1) existing psychosocial intervention modalities, and (2) the particular client characteristics that lend themselves to specific change modalities. Required of all Direct Practice students. Prerequisite: SOCW 5304, SOCW 5310, and SOCW 5551.

SOCW 6326. DIRECT PRACTICE WITH CHILDREN AND FAMILIES. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the characteristics, strengths, and service needs of children and their families. Addresses assessment and intervention skills to work effectively with a variety of child, parent(s), and family problems. Specific techniques considered include child therapy, play therapy, behavioral contracting, cognitive-behavioral interventions, and crisis intervention. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6328. SOCIAL POLICY RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

Seminar examining methods for analyzing social policies and for assessing effects of policy. Students evaluate and apply different models for social policy analysis, including comparative models. Students work with social indicators and other data sources used in policy research. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Ph.D. program.

SOCW 6329. FORENSIC SOCIAL WORK. 3 Hours.

This course develops the understanding of the role of social workers with clients within the criminal justice system and the legal system. This course will focus on theory, intervention, and advocacy with diverse forensic populations including juveniles, adults, people accused of crimes, victims of crimes, and related systems. Forensic practice in family and social services, juvenile justice and criminal justice, child welfare, and mental health and substance abuse will be explored. This course assumes a justice oriented multisystems and interdisciplinary approach. Also offered as SOCW 4329 in the BSW program. Prerequisites: SOCW 5301, SOCW 5317, and SOCW 5304.

SOCW 6333. AGING IN AMERICAN SOCIETY. 3 Hours.

This course presents the major theories of aging, in the United States and across cultures, and explores the diverse factors of aging from various perspectives including psychological, biological, sociological, and spiritual. Theories are integrated into practice thus providing students a sound foundation for social work practice with older adults. Students develop skills for completing multi-dimensional assessments, and effective social work interventions with and on behalf of older adults. Prerequisite: SOCW 5301 and SOCW 5317.

SOCW 6336. DIRECT PRACTICE IN MENTAL HEALTH. 3 Hours.

Focuses on assessment and intervention with those evidencing acute and chronic mental health problems and disabilities. The course addresses the delivery of services to various populations (children, adolescents, and adults), service delivery systems (community mental health, managed behavioral health care), and a wide range of problems. Topics include well-being, ethics, case management, treatment planning, managed care, DSM, PIE, and substance abuse. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6339. PROGRAM EVALUATION. 3 Hours.

Presumes basic research competence on part of student. Focus on sociopolitical aspects of program evaluation as a specialized use of scientific methods and community practice skills. Relationships between program evaluation and program planning or administration stressed. Prerequisite: SOCW 5322; Co-requisite: SOCW 6371.

SOCW 6340. ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS IN HUMAN SERVICES. 3 Hours.

Acquaints students at an advanced level with research methodology as it applies to the human services. Includes techniques and tools of research, problem conceptualization, measurement, research and instrument design and data collection methods. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Ph.D. program.

SOCW 6341. ADVANCED STATISTICAL METHODS IN HUMAN SERVICES. 3 Hours.

Advanced statistical applications in the human services. Emphasis on multivariate statistical approaches including multiple regression analysis, logistic regression, and advanced general linear modeling approaches to analyzing data from social work research. Prerequisite: SOCW 6347.

SOCW 6342. HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN MACRO ENVIRONMENTS. 3 Hours.

Offers advanced students the opportunity to study people's behavior within large and complex social settings including: natural helping networks and ontological communities, organizations and bureaucracies, and social and political movements. Prerequisite: SOCW 5301 and SOCW 5317 or advanced standing status.

SOCW 6343. INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE. 3 Hours.

This course covers theoretical frameworks for understanding and addressing intimate partner violence as well as culturally sensitive prevention and intervention practice models. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6344. TREATMENT OF CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS. 3 Hours.

Overview of the literature which describes physical, psychological, and cultural characteristics unique to childhood and adolescence. Attention then turned to treatment principles, and the specification of procedures for the amelioration of problems common to children and adolescents. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6345. HEALTH POLICY. 3 Hours.

Historical, current, and projected national and local health policies and roles of providers and consumers of health care examined; service demands, economic, access, and regulatory issues analyzed; relationships between governmental, voluntary, and commercial sectors studied; analytic frameworks for the understanding and development of policies developed. Prerequisite: SOCW 5303.

SOCW 6346. TEACHING PRACTICUM. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the academic role through teaching practice at graduate and/or undergraduate level supervised by a full-time faculty member. Prerequisite: SOCW 6328, SOCW 6340, SOCW 6348,SOCW 6373.

SOCW 6347. INTERMEDIATE STATISTICS. 3 Hours.

Statistical applications for doctoral social work students. Emphasizes both parametric and non-parametric techniques, including t-tests, ANOVA, correlation and regression, chi-square, and other non-parametrics. Designed to provide a foundation for advanced multivariate statistical techniques. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Ph.D. program.

SOCW 6348. SEMINAR IN QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS. 3 Hours.

Explores a variety of qualitative approaches to knowledge building and research. Designed to prepare students to carry out research projects within their areas of interest. Content includes discussions of knowledge development, study designs, data collection, analysis, and report writing. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Ph.D. program.

SOCW 6349. AGING AND SOCIAL POLICY. 3 Hours.

Social welfare policies and programs are examined in terms of the overall impact on the aged and society. Needs and gaps in services to the aged are evaluated, especially concerning minority and low-income aged. Current issues in aging policy are examined. Prerequisite: SOCW 5303.

SOCW 6350. SEMINAR IN COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION STRATEGIES. 3 Hours.

Explores the integration of cognitive-behavioral and constructivist intervention methods in the treatment of various problems and clinical populations. The theoretical bases of cognitivism, behaviorism, and constructivism are identified and current issues in cognitive-behavioral and in constructivist methods are addressed. Assessment and interventions taught in this course are drawn from evidence-based practice knowledge and informed practice wisdom. Client strengths and individual empowerment are emphasized in formulating assessment and intervention strategies. Prerequisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6353. SEMINAR IN FAMILY THERAPY. 3 Hours.

Comparison of various approaches to working with the family as a total system; enhancement of cognitive understanding of similarities and differences in theory and goals of family treatment in many fields of practice; integration of strategies and techniques of each method into an individual style of therapy. Prerequisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6356. SEMINAR IN PROGRAM AND PRACTICE EVALUATION. 3 Hours.

This course provides hands on opportunities to develop program and clinical evaluation plans for social work/welfare agencies. Educational principles and theoretical foundations are discussed as the actual plans are developed. Students work with agency decision makers and the instructor to generate a plan acceptable to the agency for implementation. Prerequisite: SOCW 6347.

SOCW 6358. SOCIAL WORK SUPERVISION. 3 Hours.

Introduces the roles, functions, and contexts of social work supervision. Covers administrative and clinical perspectives on the social work supervisor as manager, educator, mentor, mediator, and leader in human service organizations. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325 OR SOCW 6371.

SOCW 6359. SOCIAL WORK IN SCHOOLS. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the various social work related theoretical perspectives, models, and programs for intervention with children and their families in the school setting. This includes skills in assessment, prevention, and intervention in providing services to "high risk" students, such as students in poverty and students with disabilities, and addressing issues such as teen parenting, drug and alcohol abuse, and conflict management in the school setting. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6360. CLINICAL ASSESSMENT OF CHILD MALTREATMENT. 3 Hours.

Examines knowledge/technique in child physical/emotional/sexual abuse, physical/emotional neglect, and exploitation interventions. Includes interviewing, identification, legal issues, assessment/evaluation, case management, intervention, follow-up. Prerequisite: SOCW 6325; Co-requisite: SOCW 6326 OR SOCW 6336 OR SOCW 6317.

SOCW 6361. STRESS, CRISIS, AND COPING. 3 Hours.

The impact of specific crises on individuals and families will be examined. Typical crises will include life-threatening illness, trauma, physical and mental disability, and death. Assessment and evaluation of an individual's coping ability and appropriate strategies for social work interventions will be studied. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6362. FAMILY CAREGIVING & AGING. 3 Hours.

This course will give students an overview of the individual and social impact of family caregiving and aging within a bio-psycho-social context and the role(s) of social workers in helping individuals, families, and communities face the contemporary challenges of caregiving. Course content will be underscored by a strengths-based framework and will include the effects of culture on family caregiving, families' process of providing care to persons with chronic and/or complex illness across levels of care (e.g. hospital/rehabilitation/hospice), working with family caregivers within long-term care settings (e.g. nursing homes), dementia caregiving, end of life care as well as evidence-based assessment and intervention with family caregivers. Social services and policy that social workers need to know in order to practice effectively with older adults and their family caregivers are discussed. Innovative approaches for addressing challenges in family caregiving (e.g. technology) are also explored. Particular attention is given to issues of family caregiving faced by diverse, marginalized, and oppressed populations. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6363. BUDGETING AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Basic overview of financial management applied specifically to human service agencies; emphases on basic concepts and skill building in budgeting, and fund raising; accounting principles, financial statements, and computerized financial information systems also covered. Co-requisite: SOCW 6371.

SOCW 6364. MILITARY SOCIAL WORK. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course is on examining military culture within a diversity framework, considering ethical implications for practice with this culture, comprehending prevalent social and health issues (including the effects of policies and health disparities) for this population, and analyzing current advances in knowledge of the neurobiological underpinnings of human behavior and development pertinent to those issues and to resilience to stress and adversity in this population. Implications for social work practice with individuals, families, groups, programs/organizations, and communities relevant to this population will be identified and evaluated. The implications will be examined in terms of social justice, social work values, knowledge, and skills, as well as in terms of the structural and systematic arrangement and delivery of social welfare services at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6366. DEATH & DYING. 3 Hours.

This course will give students an overview of the principles of thanatology from anthropological, sociological, psychological, medical, historical, spiritual, cultural, and political perspectives and the role(s) that social work can play in helping individuals, families, and communities to face death and loss across contexts. Using life course and life span approaches, course content will include personal death awareness, the integration of theoretical perspectives and evidence-based practice interventions in working with dying, death, and bereavement with emphasis on cultural and religious/spiritual perspectives, bioethical principles and end of life decision making, social justice, and advocacy for the dying. Therefore, the class content promotes individual self-reflection and discussion of diverse views across the developmental life span and life course about the meaning of life and death and implications for social work practice. This dialog is a precursor to engagement with clients, caregivers, grieving persons, and health care personnel about sensitive issues around the experience of dying and death. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6367. SEMINAR IN ADVANCED STATISTICAL APPLICATIONS. 3 Hours.

This seminar covers statistical analysis of complex data and statistical modeling including latent variables. Emphasis is on structural equation model analysis using AMOS, LISREL, or EQS. The course focuses on applications of statistics using various data sets. Prerequisite: Knowledge of SPSS; SOCW 6341 and SOCW 6347.

SOCW 6370. TREATING PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIPS. 3 Hours.

Treatment strategies and evaluation methods and research findings relevant to the treatment of parent-child relationships; review of existing parent training literature and commercially available parenting programs. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6371. COMMUNITY AND ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Surveys theory and builds skills in roles associated specifically with community practice (e.g. community/locality development, social planning, social action) and administrative practice (e.g. supervision, administration, management and management systems). Students complete an advanced assignment in community and/or organizational assessment and program design. Prerequisite: Advanced Standing Student or SOCW 5306, SOCW 5310, and SOCW 5551.

SOCW 6373. THEORY AND MODELING BUILDING IN SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH. 3 Hours.

This course gives special emphasis on ways in which theory informs social work research.This course prepares students to perform application and critical analysis of social science and social work theory and theory-driven research. The course involves students in integrating theory, research, and social work practice with the goal of producing models of interventions, programs, and policies. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Ph.D. program.

SOCW 6380. TREATMENT OF ADDICTIVE BEHAVIORS. 3 Hours.

Surveys major treatment alternatives, showing addictive behavior patterns such as alcohol/drug abuse or eating disorders. Student conducts field research of 12-step programs, practices interventions, and studies inpatient and outpatient treatment methods with emphasis on relapse prevention. Prerequisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6385. SOCIAL WORK AND MANAGED CARE. 3 Hours.

Explores the history of managed care in health and social services, the underlying philosophy, and current trends and practice issues. Assesses the potential for conflict between social work values and managed care systems. Builds skills for administrative roles in managed care settings. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325 OR SOCW 6371.

SOCW 6386. GRANT PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR. 3 Hours.

Grant proposal development is a fundamental method of accessing funds and developing new programs in the social service arena. In this class, students will identify key funding opportunities in their fields of interest and will write a proposal using an actual federal application and a foundation funding announcement. The majority of the course will be devoted to the development of the skills and knowledge necessary to produce a competitive proposal. These include, but are not limited to: a) needs and capacities assessment, b) program development, c) strategic planning, d) budgeting, e) evaluation, and f) community collaboration. Co-requisite: SOCW 6371.

SOCW 6389. BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course is on current advances in knowledge of the neurobiological underpinnings of human behavior and development, the interaction between those underpinnings and the social context and environment, the relevance to social work practice with individuals, families, groups, programs/organizations, and communities, and related assessment and intervention practice behaviors across several practice domains. The domains include human development, genetics, mental health and substance abuse, cognition, stress and trauma, and violence and aggression. The implications of neurobiological and environmental influences (including public health issues and health disparities) will be examined in terms of social justice, social work values, knowledge, and skills, as well as in terms of the structural and systematic arrangement and delivery of social welfare services at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Co-requisite: SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6390. TUTORIAL. 3 Hours.

Arrangements may be made for a directed and supervised tutorial in a select area of special interest to the student.

SOCW 6392. SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIAL WELFARE. 3 Hours.

Topics vary from semester to semester depending on the needs and interest of the students. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

SOCW 6393. THESIS RESEARCH. 3 Hours.

Initial research in the student's area of concentration, leading to thesis. Prerequisite for SOCW 6398. Prequisite: permission of instructor.

SOCW 6394. APPLIED RESEARCH PRACTICUM. 3 Hours.

Students engage in an active program of applied research under direct supervision of a faculty member.

SOCW 6396. SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION: PRINCIPLES AND SKILLS. 3 Hours.

Considers a range of ideas in educational thought relevant to the formulation of an analytical appraisal of social work education and training. Educational methods and skills relevant to social work are addressed and practice opportunities offered. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Ph.D. program.

SOCW 6397. WRITING FOR PUBLICATION. 3 Hours.

This course will explore the world of academic publishing. Students will provide peer reviews of manuscripts, prepare and critique their ideas and draft sections of a manuscript, and present a final manuscript and publication plan. The intent is to help the students increase their chance of publishing manuscripts as a Ph.D. student and as a new faculty member. Although nothing can substitute for having information and research relevant for the field, the art of writing for publication should not be underestimated. Journal publishing, like any other human service endeavor, is easier as you become proficient. Most academics become proficient at communicating their ideas and research through trial and error. However, one's chances of becoming published can be increased by learning from experts in the field. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Ph.D. program.

SOCW 6398. THESIS. 3 Hours.

Requires an individual research project in the individual's area of concentration, with a minimum of six semester hours total needed for the project. Satisfactory completion requires approval of the instructor in charge, a supervising committee appointed by the Dean of Graduate Studies. Defense in a final oral examination is required. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

SOCW 6399. DISSERTATION. 3 Hours.

Preparation and submission of a doctoral dissertation in an area in social work.

SOCW 6451. APPLIED SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE II. 4 Hours.

SOCW 6452. APPLIED SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE III. 4 Hours.

SOCW 6694. APPLIED RESEARCH PRACTICUM. 6 Hours.

Students engage in an active program of applied research under direct supervision of a faculty member.

SOCW 6698. THESIS. 6 Hours.

Requires an individual research project in the individual's area of concentration, with a minimum of six semester hours total needed for the project. Satisfactory completion requires approval of the instructor in charge, a supervising committee appointed by the Dean of Graduate Studies. Defense in a final oral examination is required.

SOCW 6699. DISSERTATION. 6 Hours.

Preparation and submission of a doctoral dissertation in an area in social work.

SOCW 6851. APPLIED SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE II. 8 Hours.

Practical application of social work skills in real world environment. Student is assigned to field agency to enhance and practice learned theories. This course is 500 hours of direct client contact in agency setting as provided by the Field Experience Office. Prerequisite: SOCW 5310/SOCW 5551 and SOCW 6325.

SOCW 6999. DISSERTATION. 9 Hours.

Preparation and submission of a doctoral dissertation in an area in social work.

SOCW 7399. DOCTORAL DEGREE COMPLETION. 3 Hours.

This course may be taken during the semester in which a student expects to complete all requirements for the doctoral degree and graduate. Enrolling in this course meets minimum enrollment requirements for graduation, for holding fellowships awarded by The Office of Graduate Studies and for full-time GTA or GRA positions. Students should verify that enrollment in this course meets other applicable enrollment requirements. To remain eligible in their final semester of study for grants, loans or other forms of financial aid administered by the Financial Aid Office must enroll in a minimum of 5 hours as required by the Office of Financial Aid. Other funding sources may also require more than 3-hours of enrollment. Additional hours may also be required to meet to requirements set by immigration law or by the policies of the student's degree program. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office, other sources of funding, Office of International Education and/or their graduate advisor to verify enrollment requirements before registering for this course. This course may only be taken once and may not be repeated. Students who do not complete all graduation requirements while enrolled in this course must enroll in a minimum of 6 dissertation hours (6699 or 6999) in their graduation term. Graded P/F/R.

Faculty

Scott Ryan
Professor/Dean,School of Social Work

Debra Woody
Associate Professor/Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

John Bricout
Professor/Associate Dean for Research and Community Outreach

Beverly Black
Professor

Rebecca Hegar
Professor

Richard Hoefer
Professor

Cathleen Jordan
Professor

Peter Lehmann
Professor

Vijayan Pillai
Professor

Phillip Popple
Professor

Maria Scannapieco
Professor

Regina Aguirre
Associate Professor

Randall Basham
Associate Professor

Norman Cobb
Associate Professor

Schnavia Hatcher
Associate Professor

Diane Mitschke
Associate Professor

Craig Nagoshi
Assoicate Professor

Alexa Smith-Osborne
Associate Professor

Gail Adorno
Assistant Professor

Anne Baine-Nordberg
Assistant Professor

Courtney Cronley
Assistant Professor

Noelle Fields
Assistant Professor

Michael Killian
Assistant Professor

Elissa Madden
Assistant Professor

Katherine Sanchez
Assistant Professor

Eusebius Small
Assistant Professor

Ling Xu
Assistant Professor

Lashaunn Bold
Assistant Professor in Practice

Bruce Bower
Assistant Professor in Practice

Jan Finch
Assistant Professor in Practice

Marcela Gutierrez
Assistant Professor in Practice

Kiva Harper
Assistant Professor in Practice

Jane Hickerson
Assistant Professor in Practice

Pamela Kleespies
Assistant Professor in Practice

James Langford
Assistant Professor in Practice

Marta Mercado-Sierra
Assistant Professor in Practice

Ericka Robinson-Freeman
Assistant Professor in Practice