College of Science

UNDERGRADUATE:

Overview

Pursuit of knowledge through scientific study has been the cornerstone of human accomplishment throughout history. The College of Science continues this tradition by providing undergraduate students with curricula that allow exploration and mastery of both the basic concepts and most recent advances of modern science and preparation for professional scientific careers. The College of Science consists of the departments of Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, and Psychology. Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degrees offered by these departments prepare students to pursue a wide variety of rewarding, professional scientific careers or graduate study. Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees are offered in all departments. Bachelor of Arts degrees allow students to develop a broad liberal education with a concentration in science and are particularly appropriate for careers in science teaching. Bachelor of Science degrees provide students with a more intensive background in science, preparing them for advanced graduate study or entry into exciting technological careers in industry, medicine, government, business, or commerce. A wide range of degree options within departmental B.S. programs provide students with career-oriented course work required to pursue professional career paths in specific scientific fields. All departments within the college provide highly accessible student academic and career advising that support customization of degree plans to meet a student's specific career goals.

The College of Science fosters interaction between students and faculty. Faculty actively participate as advisors to student scientific societies and are readily available to assist or advise students both within and outside the classroom. Faculty members in all departments actively participate in research supported by world-class research facilities and modern scientific equipment. Undergraduate science majors are encouraged to engage in research under the supervision of a faculty member of their choice, many of whom have international reputations for their scholarly contributions. Students can receive course credit for supervised research.

Beyond the undergraduate degree, the College of Science offers programs leading to graduate degrees. All departments offer Master of Science degrees (M.S.) that allow students to pursue technologically intensive careers in public or private arenas. A Master of Arts in Science (M.A.I.S.) degree program specifically prepares students for careers as science teachers. The departments of Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Mathematics, Physics and Psychology offer the Doctor of Philosophy degrees (Ph.D.) that allow students to carry out independent dissertation research within a chosen scientific specialty, leading to careers in research and/or university teaching. The M.S. and Ph.D. degrees offered by the Graduate Program in Environmental Science and Engineering prepare students for careers as environmental professionals. The Graduate Catalog provides details of the college's master's and doctoral degree programs.

Also available to undergraduate students in the College of Science are unique and innovative combined degree programs leading to both a B.S. degree and a graduate or professional degree within an accelerated time frame. These combined degree programs include the five-year Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Biology/Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) degree programs in Health Care and Biomedical Sciences Management and a five-year B.S. in Biology/Master of Biomedical Engineering (M.B.E.) degree program (see the Department of Biology section of this catalog for detailed descriptions of these programs).

The College of Science takes pride in offering students outstanding degree programs in all of its departments. These programs are marked by excellent teaching, broad undergraduate research opportunities and superior academic and career advising. Graduates of these degree programs are highly competitive in the job market or when applying to nationally recognized graduate or health professions schools. Please visit the College of Science and speak with one of our advisors. Call 817.272.3491 to make an appointment.

Opportunities in Science

The future marvels of the 21st century will spring from science just as did those of the 20th century. The human genome project, miracle drugs, efficient fuels, arrays of new synthetic materials, the transistor, the laser, nuclear power, solar energy, computers, the Worldwide Web, global information systems, the electron microscope, nanotechnology, bioinformatics and sophisticated techniques for locating mineral deposits are merely a few examples of the crowning scientific achievements of the past century. Discoveries of similar or greater magnitude lie ahead in this new century as scientists bring their talents to bear on modern society's pressing problems such as alternative energy sources, environmental protection, and improved health care. Students graduating from College of Science degree programs have the unique opportunity to participate in this century of new and unparalleled scientific discovery.

Requirements for Admission to the College of Science

The University of Texas at Arlington does not admit students to specific degree programs. Instead students wishing to pursue a major in one of the College of Science undergraduate degree programs must apply to the appropriate academic unit for acceptance into that program. Students should familiarize themselves with the general requirements for acceptance to the degree program of their choice as well as the specific requirements for granting of the degree.

Academic Policies for College of Science Majors

In the College of Science, students are required to maintain a minimum overall GPA of 2.25 in all their course work as well as a minimum GPA of 2.25 in their major course work in order to remain in good standing within their degree program. Students whose overall or major GPA falls below 2.25 will be dropped as a major in the College of Science and must select an alternative major.
The general College of Science policy on academic probation may be superseded by more rigorous policies within specific science degree programs.

Academic Policies for Science Minors

A science minor consists of 18 credit hours or more in any one of the departments within the college. At least 6 of the 18 hours must be in advanced 3000 or 4000 level courses. All classes that are to be used toward a minor must also be applicable toward a major in the same discipline. Non majors courses may not be applied toward a minor.
A 2.0 grade average must be maintained in the minor In order to be approved by the minor department. All classes for a science minor must be approved by an academic advisor in the minor department. Transfer students must complete at least nine hours toward the minor at UT Arlington, and six of the nine must be 3000 or 4000 level.

Transfer Students

Field of Study

Students who complete an approved field of study curriculum in whole or in part will receive academic credit for the equivalent courses within their selected field of study at UT Arlington. To view the field of study curriculums approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, visit www.thecb.state.tx.us.

Core Complete

Students who transfer from a Texas community college or university and are certified as core complete shall have satisfied the core requirements of UT Arlington. Academic departments may, in some instances, require specific courses outside the major as prerequisites for major course work.

Academic Standards

Students who wish to be admitted to a department within the College of Science must have a grade point average of 2.25 or higher in all college course work completed prior to application for admission to the UT Arlington College of Science.

Competence in Computer Use

Graduating students are expected to be proficient in the use of computers. Proficiency is considered to be the ability to utilize word-processing, database/spreadsheet, statistical, graphical and other representative software applications in a student's major discipline. Each student should be able to tap the communications, analytical, and information-retrieval potential of computers to solve scientific problems and evaluate research results. Students should consult with their individual department, school or college undergraduate advisors to determine the mechanisms by which they can demonstrate computer competency. A student may be required to pass a proficiency examination or complete a department- or college-designated computer proficiency course to meet this requirement.

Competence in Oral Presentations

Graduating students are expected to have proficiency in oral communication skills including interaction in classroom settings to meet the needs of their course work and utilization of acceptable grammar and pronunciation in formal presentations. Students should consult their individual department, school or college undergraduate advisors to determine the mechanisms by which they can demonstrate oral communication skills competency. A student may be required to pass a proficiency examination or complete a department- or college-designated oral communication skills course to meet this requirement.

Substitutions for Modern and Classical Languages in the College of Science Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

With the approval of the major advisor and the Dean of Science, a student may substitute two courses in a single area cluster for six hours of a modern or classical language. The area clusters1:

African American Area Cluster

HIST 3365AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY TO 18653
HIST 3366AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 1865-PRESENT3
POLS 4318POLITICS OF AFRICAN AMERICANS3
HIST 4374AFRICAN HISTORY I3
HIST 4375AFRICAN HISTORY II3
HIST 4376AFRICAN DIASPORA I3
HIST 4377AFRICAN DIASPORA II3
ENGL 3345AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE3

 Mexican Area Cluster

HIST 3368MEXICAN AMERICAN HISTORY3
HIST 4368HISTORY OF MEXICO3
POLS 3317MEXICAN POLITICS AND U.S.-MEXICO RELATIONS3
POLS 4319POLITICS OF MEXICAN AMERICANS3
ENGL 3346MEXICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE3

 American Indian Area Cluster

ANTH 3333NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS3
ANTH 3350NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY3
HIST 3367AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY3
HIST 3370THE IMAGE OF THE AMERICAN WEST3

Russian Area Cluster

ENGL 3301RUSSIAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION3
HIST 4359HISTORY OF RUSSIA TO 18553
HIST 4360HISTORY OF RUSSIA SINCE 18553
POLS 4365FOREIGN POLICIES OF RUSSIA AND THE SUCCESSOR STATES3

Latin America Area Cluster

ART 3320ART OF THE ANCIENT AMERICAS3
HIST 4365HISTORY OF SPAIN AND PORTUGAL3
HIST 4366LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY: ORIGINS THROUGH INDEPENDENCE3
HIST 4367LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY: POST-INDEPENDENCE TO THE PRESENT3
POLS 3316DICTATORSHIP AND DEMOCRACY IN LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS3
POLS 4319POLITICS OF MEXICAN AMERICANS3
1

One of ANTH 2322 GLOBAL CULTURES, or ANTH 3331 CULTURE AND PERSONALITY, or LING 2301 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF HUMAN LANGUAGE, may substitute for three hours in one of the area clusters.

Premedical/Predental and Post Baccalaureate Professional Programs

Advising of premedical/dental/pharmacy/optometry and veterinary medicine students is provided by the Office of the Dean of Science, Room 206 in the Life Science Building. Services for students include preadmission counseling, career counseling, and assistance in applying to professional schools. Many medical and dental schools request a recommendation from the applicant's undergraduate institution. At The University of Texas at Arlington, this recommendation is provided by the Health Professions Advisory Committee. The purpose of the Committee is to interview and evaluate applicants for admission to medical or dental school. Criteria for obtaining a Committee recommendation are established by the Committee and are periodically reviewed. Students planning to apply to professional schools should contact the Health Professions Advisor in the Office of the Dean of Science at least one year prior to making application.

Medical and dental school applicants should begin the application process in January of the year preceding their intended entry to professional school. An applicant's file should be complete, including the Health Professions Advisory Committee evaluation by the following May 1.

Students who plan to enroll for the fall MCAT and DAT examinations are expected to follow the spring application process. The professional schools will hold the applicant's credentials until MCAT and DAT scores are received.

In general, medical and dental school admission committees do not state a preference regarding an applicant's undergraduate major, leaving students to choose a degree program best suited to their special abilities and interests. Therefore, a student may choose any major, after conferring with the Health Professions Advisor, as long as the minimum requirements for admission to the medical or dental school are met.

Post Baccalaureate Premedical Program

The post baccalaureate premedical program is designed for those students who have previously completed a bachelor's degree and wish to pursue admission to medical school. Since student backgrounds may vary, each post baccalaureate program is custom designed for the individual student. Students in this program may complete premedical requirements in one to two years depending upon their undergraduate major and the time of entry to the program.

Post baccalaureate courses can be completed independently of a structured degree or certificate. The only concern on the part of the medical schools is that all requirements are completed. For those students who wish to recieve a certificate in recognition of their studies, the College of Science offers a Certificate in Pre Professional Studies. The certificate requires completion of two upper division biology classes approved by the health professions advisor, two organic chemistry classes (CHEM 2321 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I & CHEM 2181 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY, CHEM 2322 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II & CHEM 2182 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY) and the second semester of physics (PHYS 1442 GENERAL COLLEGE PHYSICS II). In order to receive the certificate, students must maintain a 3.6 or higher grade point average in all required courses and the courses must be completed at UTA.

Students pursuing a major in the College of Science who plan to enter a health related profession may pursue courses related to their career goal either as electives or as a minor in Health Studies. A minor in Health Studies consists of 18 hours of course work selected from the following classes. SCIE 4301 ISSUES IN AMERICAN HEALTHCARE is required as a capstone course to pull together a comprehensive picture of healthcare in America.

ANTH 3369MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY3
BIOL 4357HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY3
ECON 3301THE ECONOMICS OF HEALTH (Pre Req. ECON 2306)3
HEED 1340HEALTHY LIFESTYLES3
HEED 3305WOMEN'S HEALTH ISSUES3
HIST 3307HISTORY OF DISABILITY3
PHIL 1304CONTEMPORARY MORAL PROBLEMS3
PHIL 3319BIOMEDICAL ETHICS3
POLS 4350HEALTH POLITICS AND POLICY3
SCIE 4301ISSUES IN AMERICAN HEALTHCARE3
SOCI 4320MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY3

 Foreign Clinical Experience

Students who wish to gain experience providing care for underserved persons outside the U.S. may enroll in a summer Foreign Clinical Experience Program jointly coordinated by the School of Nursing and the College of Science. Students in this program first take a class that familiarizes them with the culture of the country they are visiting. They then travel to the host country where they assist in a designated clinical setting. Upon completion of the experience, students submit a paper summarizing what they have learned and are awarded course credit for their experience.

Allied Health Programs

The University of Texas at Arlington offers prerequisites for a number of programs in the allied health sciences. Career counseling, degree plan evaluation and assistance in procuring hands-on experience are available for students seeking degrees in:

Health Care Administration
Physical Therapy
Dental Hygiene
Physician's Assistant
Prosthetics and Orthotics
Medical Technology1
Dietetics

as well as other related fields. These services are offered through the office of the Allied Health Coordinator, Department of Biology, Room 351, Life Science Building.

1

The program leading to a Bachelor of Science Degree in Medical Technology is described under the Department of Biology.

Teacher Certification in the Sciences

Programs leading to teacher certification at secondary levels are available in departments of the College of Science in coordination with the College of Education and Health Professions. Included among these are secondary certification in Composite Science offered in the Departments of Biology and Earth and Environmental Sciences; in Life Science offered in the Department of Biology; in Physical Science offered in the Departments of Physics and Chemistry and Biochemistry; in Chemistry offered in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry; in Physics/Mathematics offered in the Department of Physics; and in Mathematics offered in the Department of Mathematics. Descriptions of these programs are provided in each department’s section of this catalog.

Transfer Students

Students transferring from other institutions are invited to explore opportunities in the College of Science. Inquiries about the equivalency of their transferred courses and other questions related to transferring are welcome in the Office of the Dean of Science, 206 Life Science Building.

Students who plan to attend junior college or another senior college before entering UT Arlington can receive assistance in planning their course work programs and potentially avoid needless delay of graduation by consulting an advisor in the Office of the Dean of Science (206 Life Science Building) before matriculating.

Science Constituency Council

The Science Constituency Council is the official representative student organization for the College of Science with Student Government. Meeting twice monthly, the SCC serves both the College and its students. The SCC strives to involve a greater number of students in all aspects of the College of Science. SCC members are majors in the departments of the College. At least half of the voting members are elected during Student Congress elections. Self-nomination is encouraged.

Science Education and Career Center

501 S. Nedderman Dr. · 106 Life Science Bldg. · 817-272-2129

The Science Education and Career Center is an on-site resource facility designed to support student learning and course work in science and mathematics through self-study modules and a variety of study aids. In cooperation with College of Science faculty, the center offers a full spectrum of multimedia resource materials and study aids for students in biology, chemistry, geology, mathematics, physics and psychology classes. The Science Education and Career Center also provides students with a broad spectrum of information on career opportunities in science and career development presentations from a wide variety of scientific fields. The center also provides students with quiet study areas and a study lounge.

Materials currently available include:

  • Videotapes
  • VCR viewing stations
  • Study guides and sample exams
  • Lab notes and solutions manuals
  • Interactive CD-ROMs
  • Hands-on models
  • Science careers resources and counseling
  • On-site photocopiers
  • Networked computers

Math Clinic

The Math Clinic is a service provided on a walk-in basis for all math students enrolled in:

MATH 0302FUNDAMENTALS OF ALGEBRA3
MATH 1301CONTEMPORARY MATHEMATICS3
MATH 1302COLLEGE ALGEBRA3
MATH 1303TRIGONOMETRY3
MATH 1308ELEMENTARY STATISTICAL ANALYSIS3
MATH 1315COLLEGE ALGEBRA FOR ECONOMICS & BUSINESS ANALYSIS3
MATH 1316MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ANALYSIS3
MATH 1324ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY3
MATH 1325ANALYTIC GEOMETRY3
MATH 1421PREPARATION FOR CALCULUS4
MATH 1426CALCULUS I4
MATH 2326CALCULUS III3
MATH 2425CALCULUS II4
MATH 3319DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS & LINEAR ALGEBRA3

It is located in Room 325, Pickard Hall, and is open seven days a week during the Fall and Spring semesters and with limited hours during the Summer semesters. The tutors are outstanding undergraduate students with demonstrated abilities for helping students.

Physics Clinic

The Physics Clinic is a tutoring service provided on a walk-in basis for students enrolled in:

PHYS 1441GENERAL COLLEGE PHYSICS I4
PHYS 1442GENERAL COLLEGE PHYSICS II4
PHYS 1443GENERAL TECHNICAL PHYSICS I4
PHYS 1444GENERAL TECHNICAL PHYSICS II4

The tutors include graduate students, faculty and outstanding undergraduates. The location and times are posted in the Physics Department Office, 108 Science Hall.

Science and Mathematics for the Non-Science Major

The College of Science provides a wide variety of science courses for non-science majors. These courses, including those listed below, have been specifically designed to be applicable to science and mathematics requirements for non-science majors. Non-major students should examine the requirements for their degrees before selecting science courses to meet those requirements. The listed courses are also intended to stimulate interest in science and mathematics beyond the specific degree requirements for non-science majors. The courses named have no prerequisites, few prerequisites, or prerequisites consisting of introductory courses only. The figures in parenthesis indicate the number of hours of instruction per week in the Fall and Spring Semesters. The first figure indicates the amount of time devoted to theory, and the second indicates the amount of time devoted to laboratory work.

Biology

BIOL 1301NUTRITION3
BIOL 1333DISCOVERING BIOLOGY: MOLECULES, CELLS AND DISEASE3
BIOL 1334LIFE ON EARTH: EVOLUTION, ECOLOGY AND GLOBAL CHANGE3
BIOL 2317BASIC CONCEPTS IN HUMAN SEXUALITY3
BIOL 3303DRUGS AND BEHAVIOR3

Chemistry

CHEM 1445CHEMISTRY FOR NON-SCIENCE MAJORS4
CHEM 1446CHEMISTRY II FOR NON-SCIENCE MAJORS4
CHEM 1451CHEMISTRY FOR HEALTH SCIENCES4

Geology

GEOL 1360GEOLOGIC HAZARDS3
GEOL 1301EARTH SYSTEMS3
GEOL 1302EARTH HISTORY3
GEOL 1330GLOBAL WARMING3
GEOL 1350INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY3
GEOL 1350INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY3
GEOL 2410PLANETARY GEOLOGY4

Mathematics

MATH 0302FUNDAMENTALS OF ALGEBRA3
MATH 1301CONTEMPORARY MATHEMATICS3
MATH 1302COLLEGE ALGEBRA3
MATH 1308ELEMENTARY STATISTICAL ANALYSIS3
MATH 1315COLLEGE ALGEBRA FOR ECONOMICS & BUSINESS ANALYSIS3

Physics

PHYS 1300INTRODUCTION TO MUSICAL ACOUSTICS3
PHYS 1301PHYSICS FOR NON SPECIALISTS I3
PHYS 1302PHYSICS FOR NON SPECIALISTS II3

Psychology

The psychology courses listed below are of general interest. Such courses contribute significantly to a well-balanced education even though they do not apply to any science requirement.

PSYC 1315INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY3
PSYC 2317BASIC CONCEPTS IN HUMAN SEXUALITY 13
PSYC 2443RESEARCH DESIGN & STATISTICS I4
PSYC 3301PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN RELATIONS3
PSYC 3304ANALYSIS & MANAGEMENT OF BEHAVIOR3
PSYC 3303DRUGS AND BEHAVIOR 13
PSYC 3306PSYCHOLOGY OF CREATIVITY AND CREATIVE THINKING3
PSYC 3310DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY3
PSYC 3311ADULTHOOD AND AGING3
PSYC 3312SOCIAL & PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT3
PSYC 3313CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY3
PSYC 3314PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY3
PSYC 3315SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY3
PSYC 3316ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY3
PSYC 3317INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL AND COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY3
PSYC 3318ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY3
PSYC 3326ANIMAL BEHAVIOR 13
1

Course can be taken as biology.

GRADUATE:

Mission and Philosophy

The College of Science graduate programs are committed to excellence in graduate education and research and contribute, along with other institutions in this country and throughout the world, to the expansion of scientific knowledge. Graduates of our programs are highly trained and educated scientists who will be able to contribute to the economic and social well-being of our state and nation.

Overview

With outstanding departments of Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Mathematics, Physics and Psychology, the College of Science offers comprehensive graduate studies with our world class faculty and research programs. In addition to providing our students with strong core training in the physical and life sciences, we have a graduate program in Materials Science and Engineering and offer specialized Masters degrees for educators to expand their core science training. Interdisciplinary programs and Research Centers provide students with opportunities to span disciplines, and student research activities are complemented by excellent research facilities and state-of-the-art instrumentation. The College and Departments host a series of seminars to further expose our students to cutting edge science developments.

Master's degrees are offered in all of our departments, and we award Ph.D. degrees in Quantitative Biology, Applied Chemistry, Environmental and Earth Sciences, Mathematics, Applied Physics, Experimental Psychology, and Materials Science and Engineering. For application and entrance requirements, or more on our graduate programs, please call us or visit our Web site at www.uta.edu/cos.

Scholastic Activity and Research Interests of the Faculty

Biology

The Department of Biology has a wide array of research programs ranging from molecular through ecosystem levels of integration. The program boasts strengths in ecology and systematics, evolution, microbiology, genomics, and molecular biology, and has active funding from a variety of private and public agencies. The department also hosts centers for genomics, biological macrofouling, electron microscopy and a collection of vertebrates. The research program emphasizes quantitative aspects of biology and provides students with strong training in statistics and experimental design.

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Research programs include synthetic work on natural products, medically active agents, novel ligands, new catalysts, luminescent materials, photocatalysts, supramolecular and metallosupramolecular compounds, molecular magnetism, molecular recognition, stabilization of reactive intermediates, solar energy conversion and electrically conducting polymers. Biochemical research includes studies of enzymology and molecular biology of bacterial metabolism, and studies on problems involved in anticancer therapy. Physical, analytical and electrochemical research includes studies of colloids and surfaces, electrode modification through thin film surface deposition, MALDI mass spectrometry and characterization of the electrical properties of polymers and other materials. Theoretical studies involve both a major computational program applying molecular orbital theory to a variety of problems.

Earth and Environmental Sciences

Department research has a strong orientation toward the application of geochemistry, oceanography, geophysics and paleobiology to earth resources and the environment. Current research interests include analysis and modeling of geologic deformational structures, biostratigraphy of accreted terranes of the Pacific Northwest and the middle Permian of West Texas, sedimentology, paleoclimatology, hydrology, fluvial geomorphology, environmental health, and plate tectonics.

Mathematics

The Department of Mathematics at the University of Texas at Arlington is fast evolving into one of the premier centers in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex for mathematics research and education. Our active research faculty have strengths that lie in pure, applied mathematics, statistics, and mathematics education. Many of their research projects are supported by external grants. Recent faculty scholarly accomplishments attest to the high quality of research. The research interests of the faculty in the Mathematics Department include the following areas:

Algebra: homological theory of commutative Noetherian rings; noncommutative algebra using geometric methods: symbolic computations; representations of Lie Algebas and superalgebras.

Differential Equations, Integral Equations and Dynamical Systems: geometric study of integrable Hamiltonian systems; stability and instability of solitary waves; nonlinear dispersive waves; free boundary problems related to phase transition and multi-fluid flow; stochastic differential equations; control theory; inverse problems; computerized tomography.

Geometry: birational algebraic geometry and Mori theory; differential geometry and inverse spectral geometry; finite geometry related to nonassociative division algebras.

Mathematical Biology: mathematical modeling of microbial populations, biofilms and competition dynamics; population biology and epidermiology; neuronal dynamics.

Mathematical Statistics, Probability Theory and Stochastic Process: multivariate analysis, statistical inference, sample survey and statistical process control; stochastic processes and applications to stochastic differential equations, random graphs, path integrals, quantum mechanics.

Mathematical Education: mathematics program development, impact of reform mathematics learning strategies on mathematics teaching, mathematics problem solving for teaching.

Numerical Analysis: numerical solutions to ordinary and partial differential equations; moving grid, multigrid and multilevel adaptive methods; fluid dynamics (mechanics); numerical simulation and scientific computation; numerical combustion; software development.

Physics

Current research in the department is primarily in the areas of condensed matter physics, materials science and high energy physics. The theoretical condensed matter group is engaged in cluster, electron transport, electronic structure, molecular dynamics and path integral computations having relevance to the chemical, electrical and magnetic properties of surfaces, metals and semiconductors. The experimental condensed matter group is engaged in studies of diamond coatings, magnetic multilayers, metals, semiconductors and surfaces using electron, positron, optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopies. The experimental high energy group is involved in collider experiments at Fermilab, Brookhaven Laboratory and CERN to study QCD and to search for supersymmetry and other physics beyond the standard model. Other active research areas include high energy theory, optics, parallel computing and statistical physics.

Psychology

Expertise and research activity include animal behavior, animal and human learning, cognitive processes, social psychology, psychobiology and developmental psychology. Current research interests include group brainstorming, verbal memory and neuropsychology, applied psychological measurement, pain systems, decision processes, naturalistic social cognition, stress, genetic and hormonal determinants of aggressive and defensive behaviors and parent-offspring interactions, sea turtle behavior, and infant mental representation of objects.

Science Education

The Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Science (MAIS), a 36 credit hour degree program without a thesis requirement, was designed and developed by science teachers for science teachers. The program will help science educators strengthen and update their knowledge of content in two or more of the following cognate areas: biology, chemistry, earth & environmental sciences, mathematics, and physics. In addition to enhancing content knowledge, the courses will help educators develop teaching strategies that lead to improved student learning, implement high quality instructional materials, and develop skills in using various strategies for assessing student learning. The MAIS degree will serve the needs of classroom teachers, content-area and staff development specialists, curriculum developers, program directors, school administrators, college/university faculty, and educators from informal science institutions who have responsibility for designing, delivering, evaluating, and/or continuously improving standards-based science, mathematics, and technology instruction for students, prekindergarten through the undergraduate degree.

While engaging in the coursework, educators will become learners themselves to deepen their own mastery of scientific and/or mathematical content. The laboratory-based learning activities in the program will help science educators see teaching as less a matter of knowledge transfer and more as an activity of facilitation in which knowledge is generated, content is investigated in depth, and meaning is developed from experience. Graduates of the program will take their place as master science educators who are recognized as proven practitioners in delivering rigorous and relevant instruction and are valued as effective coaches, mentors, and teacher trainers.

Programs

Master of Science Degrees

Biology
Chemistry
Earth & Environmental Sciences (Both Thesis and Non-thesis)
Mathematics
Physics
Psychology

Master of Arts Degree

Interdisciplinary Science (Non-thesis)
Mathematics

Doctoral Degrees

Chemistry
Experimental Psychology
Physics and Applied Physics
Quantitative Biology
Mathematics
Earth and Environmental Sciences