Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Courses

IE 1104. INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING. 1 Hour. (TCCN = ENGR 1101)

Introduction to basic engineering concepts. Students will become familiar with engineering and its many sub-fields, ethical responsibilities, creativity and design.

IE 1105. INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING LAB. 1 Hour.

Introduction to basic engineering concepts. Opportunities are provided to develop skills in oral and written communication, and department-specific material. Case studies are presented and analyzed.

IE 2000. Undergraduate Research. 0 Hours.

Sophomore level undergraduate research. May be taken a maximum of three times. Prerequisite: Departmental good standing and permission of instructor.

IE 2305. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

An overview of Industrial Engineering concepts and issues important to the design and operation of industrial and service systems. Students will learn the use of software tools developed to enhance the Industrial Engineer's ability such as database management, high level programming languages, electronic spreadsheets, and computer graphics. Prequisite: IE 1105 or concurrent enrollment.

IE 2308. ECONOMICS FOR ENGINEERS. 3 Hours.

Methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. Provides the student with the basic tools required to analyze engineering alternatives in terms of their worth and cost, an essential element of engineering practice. The student is introduced to the concept of the time value of money and the methodology of basic engineering economy techniques. The course will provide the student with the background to enable them to pass the Engineering Economy portion of the Fundamentals of Engineering exam. Prerequisites: MATH 1426 or concurrent enrollment.

IE 3000. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 0 Hours.

Junior level undergraduate research. May be taken a maximum of three times. Prerequisite: Departmental good standing and permission of instructor.

IE 3301. ENGINEERING PROBABILITY. 3 Hours.

Topics in engineering that involve random processes. Applications and backgrounds for topics in reliability, inventory systems, and queuing problems, including absolute and conditional probabilities, discrete and continuous random variables, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, and an introduction to linear regression, experimental design, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: MATH 2425.

IE 3312. ECONOMICS FOR ENGINEERS. 3 Hours.

Tools and methods used for determining the comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. Prerequisite: MATH 1426 or concurrent enrollment.

IE 3314. ENGINEERING RESEARCH METHODS. 3 Hours.

A continuation of IE 3301. Simple and multiple linear regression analysis, design of experiments, analysis of variance, and quality control statistics. Emphasis on the application of these methods to engineering data, with computerized data analysis. Prerequisite: IE 3301 and MATH 2326.

IE 3315. OPERATIONS RESEARCH I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the major deterministic techniques of operations research and their application to decision problems. Linear programming, integer programming, network analysis, dynamic programming, nonlinear programming. Course software is used. Project required. Prerequisite: IE 3301 or concurrent enrollment and MATH 2326.

IE 3343. METRICS AND MEASUREMENT. 3 Hours.

This course presents methods for determining the most effective utilization of effort in the man-machine environment as well as systems and methods to measure enterprise performance. The computer competency evaluation is administered in this course for those students who have not had IE 1105. Prerequisite: MATH 2326, IE 3312 or concurrent enrollment, and IE 3301 or concurrent enrollment.

IE 4000. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 0 Hours.

Senior level undergraduate research. May be taken a maximum of three times. Departmental good standing and permission of instructor.

IE 4191. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 1 Hour.

The investigation of special individual problems in industrial engineering under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of the department chairperson.

IE 4291. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 2 Hours.

The investigation of special individual problems in industrial engineering under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of the department chairperson.

IE 4300. TOPICS IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

A study of selected topics in industrial engineering. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and undergraduate advisor.

IE 4302. ENGINEERING ADMINISTRATION AND ORGANIZATION. 3 Hours.

A survey of administration, control and organization of engineering and research activities. Strategic planning as well as project planning and control are discussed. Prerequisite: accepted in an UTA engineering professional program.

IE 4303. PRODUCTION AND INVENTORY CONTROL. 3 Hours.

Fundamental theory and design of systems for the control of production, inventories and their economic interaction, particularly in cases involving uncertainty of demand, of supply availability, and of production rates. Prerequisite: IE 3301 and IE 3315.

IE 4304. ENTERPRISE SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

An extension of Production and Inventory Control (IE 4303), this course covers enterprise resource planning systems (ERP) in manufacturing, E-Commerce and supply chain environments. ERP software and case studies are reviewed. Prerequisite: IE 4303.

IE 4308. QUALITY SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

A comprehensive coverage of modern quality systems techniques to include the design of statistical process control systems, acceptance sampling, and process analysis and design. Prerequisite: IE 3314 or concurrent enrollment.

IE 4310. INDUSTRIAL AND PRODUCT SAFETY. 3 Hours.

Scientific, managerial, and legal aspects of safety hazard control and elimination in the industrial workplace. Methods for enhancing product safety. Prerequisite: accepted in an UTA engineering professional program.

IE 4315. OPERATIONS RESEARCH II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of IE 3315 to probabilistic techniques of operations research and their application to decision models. Topics include z-transforms, linear difference equations, Markov chains, game theory, decision analysis, queuing theory, and non-quantitative aspects of decisions. Group projects are required. Prerequisite: IE 3301, IE 3315, and MATH 3319 (or concurrent enrollment).

IE 4318. ENTERPRISE DESIGN. 3 Hours.

Design, analysis, and modeling of enterprises. Topics include enterprise architectures, structured system modeling methods, enterprise integration, and enterprise transformation. Prerequisite: accepted in an UTA engineering professional program.

IE 4322. ENTERPRISE SIMULATION. 3 Hours.

The design and analysis of complex manufacturing and service systems using computer-based discrete event simulation techniques. Topics include an introduction to simulation methods, and the design, construction and analysis of discrete-event simulation models, as well as their computer applications. The course also covers the execution and management of simulation projects and the formal presentation of their findings. Prerequisite: IE 3314 and IE 4315.

IE 4325. AUTOMATION AND ROBOTICS I. 3 Hours.

Study of the use of industrial automation and robotics technologies in manufacturing industries. The course introduces the major classes of industrial automation. Issues associated with the successful deployment of automation are presented. Laboratory exercises focus on a practical introduction to various automation technologies. Prerequisite: IE 4303 or concurrent enrollment.

IE 4339. PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCIBILITY AND RELIABILITY DESIGN. 3 Hours.

This course covers the product and process development and engineering design process with focus on collaborative design in the enterprise environment. Manufacturing, reliability, testing, logistical and product support considerations are emphasized. Prerequisite: accepted in an UTA engineering professional program.

IE 4343. FACILITIES PLANNING AND DESIGN. 3 Hours.

The course covers strategic facilities planning through detailed facilities layout design. Considerations include product flow, space and activity relationships, personnel requirements, material handling, and layout. Traditional and contemporary issues in manufacturing and their impact on facilities design including receiving, shipping, warehousing, and integration with manufacturing and supporting operations are explored. Facilities planning models and the process of evaluating, selecting, preparing, presenting, and implementing the facilities plan are covered. Prerequisite: IE 4303 or concurrent enrollment.

IE 4344. HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

Study of the interactions between people and their work, workplace, and the environment. Involves identification, measurement, analysis, and evaluation of interactions via human physical and mental capacities and limitations, and social interactions. Prerequisite: IE 3301, IE 3312, and IE 3343.

IE 4345. KNOWLEDGE AND TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Review of contemporary issues in knowledge management, knowledge engineering, technology management, and intelligent systems. Topics include knowledge acquisition, intelligent database design, decision support systems, artificial intelligence technologies, designs and tools, and collaborative development. Prerequisite: accepted in an UTA engineering professional program.

IE 4349. INDUSTRIAL AUTOMATION. 3 Hours.

Project oriented course focusing on the design, implementation, and operation of technology. An in-depth study of the design and deployment of industrial technology to meet the needs of high-precision, multi-product environments. The laboratory activities associated with the course provide practical experience. Prerequisite: IE 4325.

IE 4350. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING CAPSTONE DESIGN. 3 Hours.

This course provides an open-ended design experience through the planning and design of an enterprise in which the student must demonstrate the ability to design, develop, implement, and improve integrated systems that include people, materials, information, equipment and energy. Contemporary project management techniques are utilized. The design experience project includes submittal of several written and oral presentations culminating in a written project report and oral presentation at the end of the semester. IE 4350 is the capstone design course and draws on material from the total industrial engineering curriculum. The impact of engineering design on society is discussed. Prerequisite: all required 4000 level IE courses or concurrent enrollment.

IE 4378. INTRODUCTION TO UNMANNED VEHICLES SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

Introduction to UVS (Unmanned Vehicle Systems) such as UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems), UGS (Unmanned Ground System) and UMS (Unmanned Maritime System), their history, missions, capabilities, types, configurations, subsystems, and the disciplines needed for UVS development and operation. UVS missions could include student competitions sponsored by various technical organizations. This course is team-taught by engineering faculty. Prerequisite: Admission to a professional engineering or science program.

IE 4379. UNMANNED VEHICLE SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the technologies needed to create an UVS (Unmanned Vehicle System). Integration of these technologies (embodied as a set of sensors, actuators, computing and mobility platform sub-systems) into a functioning UVS through team work. UVS could be designed to compete in a student competition sponsored by various technical organizations or to support a specific mission or function defined by the instructors. This course is team-taught by engineering faculty. Prerequisite: B or better in IE 4378 and admission to the UVS certificate program.

IE 4391. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

The investigation of special individual problems in industrial engineering under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of the department chairperson.

IE 5191. ADVANCED STUDIES IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 1 Hour.

Individually approved research projects and reading courses in industrial engineering. Such individual studies will be graded A, B, C, D, F or X. Subject to the approval of the Graduate Advisor, IE 5191, IE 5291 and IE 5391 may be repeated as the topics change. In addition, work on a thesis substitute will be performed under IE 5391. In this case, IE 5391 is graded P/F/R.

IE 5291. ADVANCED STUDIES IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 2 Hours.

Individually approved research projects and reading courses in industrial engineering. Such individual studies will be graded A, B, C, D, F or X. Subject to the approval of the Graduate Advisor, IE 5191, IE 5291 and IE 5391 may be repeated as the topics change. In addition, work on a thesis substitute will be performed under IE 5391. In this case, IE 5391 is graded P/F/R.

IE 5300. TOPICS IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

A study of selected topics in industrial engineering. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and Graduate Advisor.

IE 5301. ADVANCED OPERATIONS RESEARCH. 3 Hours.

A survey of quantitative methods to develop modeling and decision-making skills. Topics include linear programming, goal programming, the simplex and dual simplex algorithms, transportation and assignment problems, integer programming, network analysis, nonlinear programming, decision trees, Markov Chains, and queuing theory. Prerequisites: IE 3301 or IE 5317 or equivalent.

IE 5302. INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the fundamental principles of Industrial Engineering. Topics include Human Factors Engineering, Metrics and Measurement, Production and Inventory Control, Quality Systems, Simulation and Optimization, and Facilities Planning and Design. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

IE 5303. QUALITY SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

Principles and practices of industrial quality control. Topics include the Deming philosophy, process improvements, statistical process control, process capability analysis and product acceptance. Prerequisite: IE 3301, or IE 5317, or equivalent.

IE 5304. ADVANCED ENGINEERING ECONOMY. 3 Hours.

Analysis of capital investments in engineering and technical projects. Topics include decision analysis methods, cash flows, revenue requirements, activity-based analysis, multi-attribute decisions, probabilistic analysis and sensitivity/risk analysis. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

IE 5305. LINEAR PROGRAMMING. 3 Hours.

Theory and applications of linear programming including linear programming formulation, the simplex method, duality, revised simplex, general linear programs, infeasibility, the dual simplex method, column generation, and network flow problems. Prerequisite: IE 3315 or IE 5301.

IE 5306. DYNAMIC OPTIMIZATION. 3 Hours.

Dynamic optimization methods including dynamic programming, the calculus of variations, and optimal control theory. Emphasis is on the modeling and solution of practical problems using these techniques. Prerequisites: IE 3301 and IE 3315, or IE 5317, or equivalent.

IE 5307. QUEUEING THEORY. 3 Hours.

The fundamentals of queueing theory including Markovian birth-death models, networks of queues, and general arrival and service distributions. Prerequisites: IE 3301 or IE 5317, or equivalent.

IE 5309. STOCHASTIC PROCESSES. 3 Hours.

The study of probabilistic model building including the fundamentals of both discrete and continuous Markov chains, queueing theory and renewal theory. Prerequisites: IE 3301 or IE 5317, or equivalent.

IE 5310. PRODUCTION SYSTEMS DESIGN. 3 Hours.

Methods for the design and analysis of manufacturing and logistics systems. Emphasis is placed on reducing cycle time, increasing throughput, lowering variation, and improving both quality and customer responsiveness through modeling techniques. Prerequisites: IE 5317 or equivalent, IE 5301 or concurrent and IE 5329 or concurrent or equivalent.

IE 5311. DECISION ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

A survey of methods for making optimal decisions. Topics include decision models, formal logic, fuzzy controls, statistical decision theory, game theory, multiobjective decisions, stochastic programming, information theory and qualitative aspects of the decisions. Prerequisites: IE 5301 or concurrent.

IE 5312. PLANNING AND CONTROL OF ENTERPRISE SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

A continuation of IE 5329 covering enterprise resource planning systems (ERP) and other advanced production control techniques. Computer modeling is emphasized. Prerequisite: IE 5329.

IE 5313. RELIABILITY AND ADVANCED QUALITY CONTROL TOPICS. 3 Hours.

Includes advanced quantitative topics in reliability design and quality control. Management of reliability and quality control functions are also included. Prerequisites: IE 4308 or IE 5303.

IE 5314. SAFETY ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

Methods to identify, measure, analyze, and evaluate safety hazards in the workplace. Scientific and managerial methods to prevent or control safety hazards. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

IE 5317. INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS. 3 Hours.

Topics include descriptive statistics, set theory, combinatorics, mathematical expectation, probability distributions, confidence interval estimation, regression analysis, analysis of variance, and design of experiments. Prerequisite: MATH 2326 or equivalent and permission of advisor.

IE 5318. APPLIED REGRESSION ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study of one predictor variable followed by the matrix approach to multiple linear regression. Topics include estimation, prediction, analysis of variance, residual analysis, transformations, multicollinearity, model selection, weighted least squares, ridge regression, and robust regression. Prerequisite: IE 3301 or IE 5317 or equivalent.

IE 5319. ADVANCED STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL AND TIME SERIES ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

Design of control schemes for statistical monitoring and control of modern manufacturing systems. Topics include charts for process control, effect of autocorrelation on SPC charts, and sampling plans for acceptance inspection. Prerequisite: IE 3301 and IE 5303 or equivalent.

IE 5320. ENTERPRISE ENGINEERING METHODS. 3 Hours.

A survey of enterprise engineering methods. Topics include system development methodology, discussion of enterprise architectures, activity modeling, business modeling, activity-based performance analysis, and process improvement. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

IE 5321. ENTERPRISE ANALYSIS AND DESIGN. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study of techniques useful for the analysis and design of the manufacturing enterprise. This course presents an advanced process description technique that is used, with simulation and activity based costing, to facilitate analysis and design. Prerequisites: IE 5320 and IE 5322, or concurrent enrollment.

IE 5322. SIMULATION AND OPTIMIZATION. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study of discrete event simulation theory and practice. Optimization and search techniques used in conjunction with simulation experiments are introduced. A commercial simulation software application is used. Prerequisite: IE 5317 or equivalent.

IE 5326. INDUSTRIAL BIOMECHANICS. 3 Hours.

The development and application of biomechanical models of physical work tasks, especially manual materials handling and hard-arm work activities. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

IE 5329. PRODUCTION AND INVENTORY CONTROL SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

The fundamentals of production and inventory control systems. The economic impacts of fluctuating demand, supply availability and production rates are examined. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

IE 5330. AUTOMATION AND ADVANCED MANUFACTURING. 3 Hours.

The design of automated and advanced production processes for manufacturing. Topics include numerical control, robotics, group technology, just-in-time, automated inspection and flexible manufacturing systems. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

IE 5331. INDUSTRIAL ERGONOMICS. 3 Hours.

The analysis and design of physical work, workplace, and hand tools using ergonomic principles for enhancing performance, health, and safety. Work refers mainly to whole body and hand-arm activities, while workplace refers to industrial and computerized office environments. Applications focus on people's anthropometric, musculoskeletal and psychological characteristics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

IE 5332. NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING. 3 Hours.

Methods for nonlinear optimization including classical theory; gradient methods; sequential unconstrained methods; convex programming; genetic algorithms; simulated annealing; and separable, quadratic, and geometric programming. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

IE 5333. LOGISTICS TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS DESIGN. 3 Hours.

The design and analysis of domestic and international transportation systems of people, processes, and technology. Topics include the role of transportation in the extended enterprise, transportation modeling and optimization techniques, value-added supply chain issues, and financial performance measures. Prerequisites: IE 5317 or equivalent, IE 5301 or concurrent, and IE 5329 or concurrent, or equivalent.

IE 5334. LOGISTICS DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS DESIGN. 3 Hours.

The design and analysis of distribution systems of people, processes and technology. The focus is on distribution, warehousing and material handling. Topics include the role of the warehouse in the extended enterprise, warehouse planning, process design, layout, equipment selection, workforce and workplace issues, and financial performance measures. Prerequisites: IE 5317 or equivalent, IE 5301 or concurrent, and IE 5329 or concurrent, or equivalent.

IE 5335. ADVANCED OCCUPATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL HYGIENE ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

Interaction of workers with physical environmental agents such as heat, cold, noise, vibration, illumination, radiation, and gravity. The design of work and the workplace to control environmental stresses, and their effects on workers' performance, health and safety. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

IE 5338. HUMAN ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

Human structural, physiological, psychological, and cognitive capacities and limitations in the workplace, and their effects on the design of work systems to enhance productivity, and maintain health and safety. Prerequisite: IE 3301 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

IE 5339. PRODUCT DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCIBILITY, AND RELIABILITY DESIGN. 3 Hours.

This course covers product development and engineering design process with a focus on collaborative design. Software, manufacturing, reliability, testing, logistical and product support considerations are emphasized. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

IE 5342. METRICS AND MEASUREMENT. 3 Hours.

Work measurement, methods improvements, and performance measurement. A survey of enterprise and management measurement systems is presented. Prerequisite: IE 5317 or equivalent.

IE 5345. MANAGEMENT OF KNOWLEDGE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Review of contemporary issues in knowledge management, databases, decision support systems, and intelligent systems. Topics include knowledge acquisition, intelligent database design, decision support systems, data mining, knowledge transfer, and collaborative development. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

IE 5346. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT. 3 Hours.

Review of management issues in developing and implementing new technologies and methodologies into an organization. Topics include technology forecasting, management of technology based projects, technological competitiveness, technology alliances, and collaboration. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

IE 5350. GRADUATE DESIGN CAPSTONE. 3 Hours.

Practicum in Industrial Engineering techniques consisting of professional level experience in a relevant company, agency, or institution. This technical experience is directed by a supervising professor and requires the writing of a professional report. Prerequisite: 24 hours of graduate work in Industrial Engineering.

IE 5351. INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMS ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

This course includes a survey of concepts, principles and processes required to engineer complex systems throughout the life-cycle from concept through disposal. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of advisor.

IE 5352. SYSTEMS ENGINEERING I. 3 Hours.

A study of systems engineering topics including technical planning and management, supply processes, requirements definition and analysis, functional analysis, and trade-off analysis. Prerequisite IE 5351.

IE 5353. SYSTEMS ENGINEERING II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of IE 5352. Topics include risk management, systems design and implementation, acquisition processes, assessment and control, earned value management, technical process management, and enabling products. Prerequisite: IE 5352.

IE 5354. SYSTEMS ENGINEERING III. 3 Hours.

A continuation of IE 5353. Topics include system verification, validation and transition to use, specialty engineering, improving SE processes, SE and relationships to international programs, object oriented systems engineering and configuration management. A comprehensive student project it required. Prerequisite IE 5353.

IE 5378. INTRODUCTION TO UNMANNED VEHICLE SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

Introduction to UVS (Unmanned Vehicle Systems) such as UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems), UGS (Unmanned Ground System) and UMS (Unmanned Maritime System), their history, missions, capabilities, types, configurations, subsystems, and the disciplines needed for UVS development and operation. UVS missions could include student competitions sponsored by various technical organizations. This course is team-taught by engineering faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

IE 5379. UNMANNED VEHICLE SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the technologies needed to create an UVS (Unmanned Vehicle System). Integration of these technologies (embodied as a set of sensors, actuators, computing and mobility platform sub-systems) into a functioning UVS through team work. UVS could be designed to compete in a student competition sponsored by various technical organizations or to support a specific mission or function defined by the instructors. This course is team-taught by engineering faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

IE 5391. ADVANCED STUDIES IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

Individually approved research projects and reading courses in industrial engineering. Such individual studies will be graded A, B, C, D, F or X. Subject to the approval of the Graduate Advisor, IE 5191, IE 5291 and IE 5391 may be repeated as the topics change. In addition, work on a thesis substitute will be performed under IE 5391. In this case, IE 5391 is graded P/F/R.

IE 5398. THESIS. 3 Hours.

Graded F, R.

IE 5698. THESIS. 6 Hours.

Graded P, F, R.

IE 6197. RESEARCH IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 1 Hour.

Supervised research projects directed toward the dissertation. Graded P, R, F.

IE 6297. RESEARCH IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 2 Hours.

Supervised research projects directed toward the dissertation. Graded P, R, F.

IE 6301. ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURES AND FRAMEWORKS. 3 Hours.

A survey of enterprise architectures and analysis frameworks that have been proposed for the integration of large complex enterprise systems. Emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art approaches. Prerequisite: IE 5320.

IE 6302. FACILITIES PLANNING AND DESIGN. 3 Hours.

Facilities planning through layout design. Product flow, space-activity relationships, personnel requirements, and material handling are considered, as well as receiving, shipping, warehousing, and integration with manufacturing. Facilities planning models are explored. Prerequisite: IE 5317 or equivalent, IE 5301 or concurrent, and IE 5329, or concurrent or equivalent.

IE 6303. COMBINATORIAL OPTIMIZATION. 3 Hours.

A survey of problems and algorithms in combinatorial optimization. Topics include integer programming formulation, branch-and-bound and cutting plane algorithms, computational complexity, and polyhedral theory. Prerequisite: IE 5301 or consent of instructor.

IE 6305. ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT I. 3 Hours.

The management of the engineering function in high-technology industry with principal emphasis on the historical development of industrial management principles, decision-making and planning. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

IE 6306. ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT II. 3 Hours.

The management of the engineering function in high-technology industry with principal emphasis on human resources and staffing, directing and leading, and controlling. Prerequisite: IE 6305.

IE 6308. DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS. 3 Hours.

Introduction to statistical design and analysis of experiments with applications from engineering, health care and business. Analysis includes analysis of variance, multiple comparisons and model adequacy. Designs include complete factorial, complete block, incomplete block, Latin square, Youden, two-level fractional factorial and hierachically nested. Prerequisite: IE 5318 or consent of instructor.

IE 6309. RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY AND COMPUTER EXPERIMENTS. 3 Hours.

Empirical model building and process optimization using experimental design and statistical modeling. The first half of the course covers first and second order models and designs, multiresponse experiments and mixture experiments. The second half introduces designs based on Latin hypercubes, orghogonal arrays, and number-based theoretic methods, plus models using kriging, multivariate adaptive regression splines and neural networks. Prerequisite: IE 6308.

IE 6310. INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS. 3 Hours.

Project oriented course focusing on the requirements and selection criteria for the integration of technology into simple and complex industrial activities. Prerequisite: IE 5330.

IE 6397. RESEARCH IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

Supervised research projects directed toward the dissertation. Graded P, R, F.

IE 6399. DISSERTATION. 3 Hours.

Graded F, R.

IE 6697. RESEARCH IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 6 Hours.

Supervised research projects directed toward the dissertation. Graded P, R, F.

IE 6699. DISSERTATION. 6 Hours.

Graded F, R, P, W.

IE 6997. RESEARCH IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. 9 Hours.

Supervised research projects directed toward the dissertation. Graded P, R, F.

IE 6999. DISSERTATION. 9 Hours.

Graded P, F, R.

IE 7399. DOCTORAL DEGREE COMPLETION. 3 Hours.

This course may be taken during the semester in which a student expects to complete all requirements for the doctoral degree and graduate. Enrolling in this course meets minimum enrollment requirements for graduation, for holding fellowships awarded by The Office of Graduate Studies and for full-time GTA or GRA positions. Students should verify that enrollment in this course meets other applicable enrollment requirements. To remain eligible in their final semester of study for grants, loans or other forms of financial aid administered by the Financial Aid Office must enroll in a minimum of 5 hours as required by the Office of Financial Aid. Other funding sources may also require more than 3-hours of enrollment. Additional hours may also be required to meet to requirements set by immigration law or by the policies of the student's degree program. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office, other sources of funding, Office of International Education and/or their graduate advisor to verify enrollment requirements before registering for this course. This course may only be taken once and may not be repeated. Students who do not complete all graduation requirements while enrolled in this course must enroll in a minimum of 6 dissertation hours (6699 or 6999) in their graduation term. Graded P/F/R.

Faculty

Paul Componation
Professor and Chair

Victoria Chen
Professor

Herbert Corley
Professor

Donald Liles
Professor

John Priest
Professor

Jaimie Rogers
Professor

Susan Ferreira
Associate Professor

Brian Huff
Associate Professor

Sheik Imrhan
Associate Professor

Erick Jones
Associate Professor

Jay Rosenberger
Associate Professor

Shouyi Wang
Assistant Professor

Li Zeng
Assistant Professor

Bonnie Boardman
Senior Lecturer