Public Administration

Master’s Degrees

  • Accelerated Online Master of Public Administration
  • Public Administration, M.P.A.

Certificates

  • Public Budgeting and Financial Management Certificate
  • Urban Non-Profit Management Certificate

Overview

Public Administration is concerned with the formulation, analysis, negotiation, and implementation of democratically responsible collective action. With an interdisciplinary focus, this program gives special emphasis to the urban community and the special challenges of public managers who serve in urban areas. The curriculum is designed to develop leadership capacity, understanding of the political, social, and economic characteristics of today’s urban environment and the ability to apply current theories of management and analysis to difficult management issues. The program is meant as preparation for those entering management careers in government for the first time or as career development for those already employed who are seeking upward mobility in public management.

The MPA degree at the School of Urban and Public Affairs is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA), and the curriculum conforms to NASPAA standards.

Those seeking admission to the MPA program can choose between two program options:

  1. courses taught on campus primarily during the evening hours; and
  2. courses taught online.

Applicants who choose the on-campus option may plan their courses to include the requirements of certificate programs such as Urban Nonprofit Management or Public Budgeting and Financial Management. A description of the various certificate offerings can be found in the Urban and Public Affairs section of the catalog.

A hallmark of the MPA program is its distinguished faculty that combines extensive academic and field experience in public administration with a wide range of related backgrounds. Augmenting the permanent faculty are several adjunct professors with impressive credentials in the public management field such as Bob Hart, City Manager of Kennedale, Texas; Richard Greene, Regional Director of EPA and former Mayor of Arlington, Texas.

Mission

The mission of the Master’s of Public Administration program is to strengthen public decision making and the delivery of public services in a globalized and diverse society by educating students to lead and manage organizations at all levels of government and nonprofit institutions ethically, democratically, and effectively.

For specific goals and objectives, see the UTA MPA website mpa.uta.edu.

Advising

MPA Academic Advisor: Karolyn Field

Assistant Director for Academic and  Student Affairs / Advising Coordinator:Cheryl Donaldson

Admission Requirements

MPA Program Director: Dr. David Coursey

Factors in admission decisions are the same for the on campus and online programs.

The MPA program takes a holistic approach to the application review process. Each applicant’s file is reviewed individually with equal consideration given to the quantitative and qualitative aspects of the student’s records. A complete application includes:

  • Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score: Writing (Exceptions: Outstanding UT Arlington graduates may qualify for GRE waiver providing they meet certain requirements. See "Waiving the GRE" below)
  • Undergraduate Grade Point Average (GPA): The undergraduate GPA based on the last 60 hours of course work as calculated by the Graduate Admissions from the official transcript.
  • Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores: Verbal and Quantitative (Exceptions: Outstanding UT Arlington graduates may qualify for GRE waiver providing they meet certain requirements)
  • Letters of Recommendation attesting to the applicant’s potential to do Master’s-level work and complete the program. Letters for Master’s programs should be from professors or supervisors at work.
  • Essay by applicant approximately one double-spaced page in length (approximately 250 words). The Essay is considered both for its content and quality of writing. The Essay should address the following questions: 1. Why do you want to earn a Master’s degree in the program for which you are applying? 2. What relevant background and experience do you bring to the program? The essay can also include other concerns you’d like to bring to the attention of the Graduate Advisor or Master’s Admissions Committee.
  • Non-native English speakers only: TOEFL or IELTS scores (Exceptions: An applicant holding either a Bachelor’s or a Master’s degree from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university is not required to submit a TOEFL, TOEFL iBT, or IELTS score for admission purposes.)

Types of Admission

  1. Unconditional Admission:
    Applicants who meet all the following requirements will be considered for unconditional admission:
    1. Minimum Writing GRE score of 4.0 (may be waived under certain conditions - see "Waiving the GRE" below)
    2. Minimum Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
    3. A preferred minimum Verbal GRE score of 450 (Revised GRE Test: 150), and minimum Quantitative GRE of 450 (Revised GRE Test: 141), and a minimum combined Verbal and Quantitative score of 1,000 (Revised GRE Test Combined: 291) (may be waived under certain conditions - see "Waiving the GRE" below)
    4. Outstanding letters of recommendation
    5. Strong, well-written personal essay
    6. Non-native English speakers only: TOEFL scores of at least 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based), or 79 (iBT) with sectional scores that meet or exceed 22 Writing, 21 Speaking, 20 Reading, and 16 Listening; or, IELTS score of at least 6.5.
  2. Probationary Admission:
    Applicants who do not meet all requirements for Unconditional admission will be considered for Probationary admission on the basis of the strength of all the listed admission factors. Test scores will not constitute the sole or primary basis for ending consideration of an applicant. Under Probationary admission, special course requirements or other conditions may be imposed by the CAPPA Master’s Admissions Committee. Applicants who meet all the standards for Unconditional admission except for deficiency in Writing GRE score will be considered for Probationary Admission conditional on completing an approved Writing course in their first semester.
  3. Other types of admission decisions pertaining to Master’s applicants:
    1. Deferred: Applicants who are unable to supply required application materials, or who must complete additional preparatory work before their admissibility can be determined, may be deferred until records are complete.
    2. Provisional: Applicants who are unable to supply all required documentation prior to the admission deadline but who otherwise appear to meet admission requirements may be granted Provisional admission pending submission of complete and satisfactory credentials before the end of the semester in which they have registered in a Provisional status.
    3. Denied: Applicants who fail to meet more than one of the admission requirements and for whom the CAPPA Master’s Admission Committee finds there is insufficient basis to justify any other kind of admission will be Denied admission. As the admission process is competitive, applicants meeting basic admission requirements who are less well qualified than other applicants may also be denied admission

WAIVING THE GRE 

The MPA program waives the requirement that an applicant take the GRE under any of the following conditions:

  • A 3.25 or higher undergraduate GPA based on the last 60 hours of course work AND at least three years professional non-profit or public service work experience (as judged by the MPA admission committee. Applicants should submit a supporting resume or other relevant documentation to the MPA Graduate Advisor)
  • A completed graduate degree from an accredited program in a related field such as, but not exclusively, political science, economics, urban planning, social work, criminal justice, and sociology OR a 3.0 or better higher after 12 hours of coursework in the accredited graduate degree program.
  • A completed UTA B.A. or B.S. with 3.0 or higher GPA
  • An equivalent GMAT or LSAT score from an exam taken within the last two years preceding the time of application.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS

  • Graduate students with a GPA of 3.0 or better who are enrolled in six hours or more are eligible to apply for competitive scholarships and fellowships.
  • Scholarships and fellowships for Master’s and Doctoral students will be competitively awarded based on consideration of the all admission criteria assessed by their admitting programs.

CAPPA Inadequate Academic Progress Point System

A student may be subject to dismissal from the program if they accumulate 4 deficiency points during their Master’s degree or their Ph.D. Students who complete a Master’s degree at CAPPA will not carry deficiency points into their Ph.D. work. Deficiency points may not be removed from a student’s record by repeating a course or additional coursework.

D = 2 deficiency points
F = 3 deficiency points
I = 1 deficiency point
W = 0.5 deficiency point

A graduate student, whose cumulative grade point average (GPA) falls below a 3.000 in all graduate courses, be they graduate or undergraduate level and taken while enrolled as a UT Arlington graduate student, may be subject to dismissal from the program. (Reference: http://catalog.uta.edu/academicregulations/academicstanding/#graduatetext )

Degree Requirements

Campus Degree Requirements and Courses

The campus program consists of 39 or 42 total hours, which includes 10 required core courses and 9 hours in a selected emphasis area (2 required emphasis area courses and 1 elective). PAPP 5360 PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP is a 3 credit hour internship course; however this can be waived with at least 1 year of professional experience working in the public sector. Details on internship waiver requests are available on the MPA program website (mpa.uta.edu).

Upon successfully being admitted into the MPA program, students will choose an emphasis area and degree plan. Most all classes are offered as one session per week on Monday through Thursday during evening times (6:00-8:50pm or 7-9:50pm).

Core Courses (30 hours)30
PAPP 5302FOUNDATIONS OF URBAN RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS3
PAPP 5309LOCAL POLITICS IN THE INTERGOVERNMENTAL SETTING3
PAPP 5320PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION THEORY3
PAPP 5326PUBLIC BUDGETING3
PAPP 5329FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN THE PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT SERVICES3
PAPP 5345EVALUATION RESEARCH3
PAPP 5350INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION3
PAPP 5351HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN GOVERNMENT AND NON-PROFITS3
PAPP 5358ETHICS IN THE PUBLIC SERVICE3
PAPP 5399PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION CAPSTONE3
Emphasis Area (9 hours)9
Select on Emphasis Area (see descriptions below):
Public Budgeting and Financial Management 2
Local Government Management 2
Urban Nonprofit Agency Management 2
Strategic Human Resources Management 2
Internship (3 hours)3
PAPP 5360PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP3
1

Students select an emphasis area and take a total of three courses: two required courses plus one selective from the respective list or any other course with the approval of the Emphasis Coordinator or Program Director.

2

 Emphasis Areas

3

 Internship can be waived with at least 1 year of professional experience working in the public sector. Details on internship waiver requests are available on the MPA program website (mpa.uta.edu).

Emphasis Area 1: Public Budgeting and Financial Management

Objectives-upon completion of this emphasis track, students should be able to:

  1. Review, recommend, and interpret operating and capital budget requests taking political, economic, and decision-making processes into account; and
  2. Assist the budget officer and other higher-level public officials in performing comprehensive financial analyses and developing financial and budgetary recommendations.
Required Courses (6 hours)6
PAPP 5324URBAN PUBLIC FINANCE3
PAPP 5332PUBLIC CAPITAL BUDGETING3
Selective Courses (3 hours)3
Select one of the following or a course approved by the Emphasis Coordinator or Program Director
PAPP 5306THE URBAN ECONOMY3
PAPP 5321URBAN MANAGEMENT3
PAPP 5333GOVERNMENTAL AND NONPROFIT ACCOUNTING3
PAPP 5341PROFESSIONAL REPORT WRITING3
PAPP 5342INTERMEDIATE DATA ANALYSIS3
PAPP 5346BIG DATA AND PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS3
PAPP 5348COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS3

Emphasis Area 2: Local Government Management

Objectives-upon completion of this emphasis track, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of applied analytic tools such as program evaluation, policy analysis, cost-benefit analysis, and other management decision-making tools to aid the public manager make more informed decisions;
  2. Assist public managers and other higher-level public officials to understand, analyze, and recommend appropriate solutions to complex public policy issues.
Required Courses (6 hours)6
PAPP 5312ECONOMIC POLICY3
PAPP 5355NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS IN PUBLIC POLICY3
Selective courses (3 hours)3
Select one of the following or a course approved by the Emphasis Coordinator or Program Director
PAPP 5306THE URBAN ECONOMY3
PAPP 5321URBAN MANAGEMENT3
PAPP 5324URBAN PUBLIC FINANCE3
PAPP 5325ADMINISTRATIVE LAW3
PAPP 5341PROFESSIONAL REPORT WRITING3
PAPP 5352CONFLICT RESOLUTION IN THE PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT3
PAPP 5357STRATEGIC MGT AND PLANNING IN PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT SERVICES3
PAPP 5368PRACTICAL EMPLOYMENT FOR PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT MANAGERS3

Emphasis Area 3: Urban Nonprofit Agency Management

Objectives-upon completion of this emphasis track, students should be able to:

  1. Understand the different management areas and techniques within the nonprofit organization, including institutional management, leadership, fund-raising, financial administration, human resources coordination, and planning and performance measurements.
  2. Understand the role of nonprofits as community institutions with an outward focus, including the political, economic, and inter-organizational environment, as well as marketing, legal, and government policy issues.
Required Courses (6 hours)6
PAPP 5354NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP3
PAPP 5355NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS IN PUBLIC POLICY3
Selective Courses (3 hours)3
Select one of the following or a course approved by the Emphasis Coordinator or Program Director
PAPP 5311PUBLIC POLICY FORMATION AND ANALYSIS3
PAPP 5313COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT3
PAPP 5321URBAN MANAGEMENT3
PAPP 5325ADMINISTRATIVE LAW3
PAPP 5341PROFESSIONAL REPORT WRITING3
PAPP 5346BIG DATA AND PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS3
PAPP 5348COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS3
PAPP 5357STRATEGIC MGT AND PLANNING IN PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT SERVICES3
PAPP 5367STRATEGIC PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT3
PAPP 5368PRACTICAL EMPLOYMENT FOR PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT MANAGERS3

Emphasis Area 4: Strategic Human Resources Management

Objectives-upon completion of this emphasis track, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of public human resource policies, programs, procedures, and legal issues relevant to the field; and
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of techniques employed in designing performance appraisals, recruiting and selecting employees, and developing rewards systems.
Required Courses (6 hours)6
PAPP 5367STRATEGIC PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT3
PAPP 5368PRACTICAL EMPLOYMENT FOR PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT MANAGERS3
Selective Courses (3 hours)3
Select one of the following or a course approved by the Emphasis Coordinator or Program Director
PAPP 5325ADMINISTRATIVE LAW3
PAPP 5341PROFESSIONAL REPORT WRITING3
PAPP 5342INTERMEDIATE DATA ANALYSIS3
PAPP 5346BIG DATA AND PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS3
PAPP 5352CONFLICT RESOLUTION IN THE PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT3
PAPP 5357STRATEGIC MGT AND PLANNING IN PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT SERVICES3

Online Degree Requirements and Courses

The online program consists of 39 required core hours, a 3 hour capstone, plus a 3 hour internship. Internships may be waived under the same conditions as the on campus program. Students may choose between PAPP 5332 PUBLIC CAPITAL BUDGETING and PAPP 5354 NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP but all other courses are required.

The program is designed for students to take two courses a term (Fall, Spring, Summer) in succession (one course in first half of term, another in second half of term) except in Summer where the two courses have staggered starting dates and PAPP 5399 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION CAPSTONE , which is a full semester course. It is possible to take more than two courses per term but is not advised. The curriculum is offered in a lockstep cohort format. Unlike the on campus program, there are no emphasis areas. However, is possible to complete one of two certificates (Public Budgeting and Financial Management or Urban Nonprofit Management) as part of the coursework.  An independent study, PAPP 5395 CONFERENCE COURSE IN URBAN AFFAIRS, can be substituted for one of courses with registration approval of the Program Director.

Core Courses39
PAPP 5302FOUNDATIONS OF URBAN RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS3
PAPP 5309LOCAL POLITICS IN THE INTERGOVERNMENTAL SETTING3
PAPP 5320PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION THEORY3
PAPP 5326PUBLIC BUDGETING3
PAPP 5329FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN THE PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT SERVICES3
PAPP 5332PUBLIC CAPITAL BUDGETING3
PAPP 5345EVALUATION RESEARCH3
PAPP 5350INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION3
PAPP 5351HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN GOVERNMENT AND NON-PROFITS3
PAPP 5354NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP3
PAPP 5355NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS IN PUBLIC POLICY3
PAPP 5358ETHICS IN THE PUBLIC SERVICE3
PAPP 5368PRACTICAL EMPLOYMENT FOR PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT MANAGERS3
Capstone3
PAPP 5399PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION CAPSTONE3
Internship3
PAPP 5360PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP3
1

Core Courses

2

Capstone

3

 Internship can be waived with at least 1 year of professional experience working in the public sector. Details on internship waiver requests are available on the MPA program website (mpa.uta.edu).

Dual Degree Programs

Students in public administration may participate in one of five dual degree programs whereby they can earn a Master of Public Administration and one of the following:

  1. Master of Arts in Urban Affair
  2. Master of City and Regional Planning,
  3. Master of Science in Social Work,
  4. Master of Science in Nursing,
  5. Master of Arts in Criminal Justice, or
  6. Master’s of Sociology.

By participating in a dual degree program, students can apply a number of semester hours jointly to meet the requirements of both degrees, thus reducing the total number of hours which would be required to earn both degrees separately. The number of hours which may be jointly applied ranges from nine to 18 hours, subject to the approval of Graduate Advisors from both programs. To participate in the dual degree program, students must make separate application to each program and must submit a separate Program of Work for each degree. Those interested in the dual degree program should consult the appropriate Graduate Advisor(s) for further information on course requirements. See also the statement of Dual Degree Programs in the general information section of this catalog.

Advising

PUAD Academic Advisor: Shatavia Thomas

Assistant Director for Academic and  Student Affairs / Advising Coordinator:Cheryl Donaldson

Public and Urban Administration Ph.D. Program (PUAD)

PUAD Program Director: Dr. Rod Hissong

The PUAD Ph.D. has eight required core courses, four required research courses, three hours in an elective area, and a minimum of nine dissertation credit hours. The eight core courses address the social sciences, public policy and public administration literatures critical to the integrative approach of the program. The methods courses include an intermediate quantitative methods course, an advanced quantitative methods course and a qualitative methods course.  The three hours in an elective are are chosen tailored to the student's research interests. Students are assigned an initial adviser based primarily on their research interests and add two additional supervising committee members by the end of their first semester to help guide them through their course of study.

A full-time student can expect to complete the required courses in no more than two academic years. Upon completing all courses (39 hours), students sit for their written comprehensive examination. The comprehensive examination is an integrative exam that blends public policy issues with public administration.

Students who completed a Masters in Public Administration or a Masters in Public Policy degree may be eligible to waive some coursework and are encouraged to meet with their advisory committee chair after admission to review their degree plan.

Application Requirements and Deadlines

Along with the Graduate School application requirements, a complete application includes:

  1. Official transcripts from colleges and universities attended. Students that obtained their masters degree at UT Arlington are not required to submit separate copies of transcripts as their information will be available to the CAPPA advisors online. Information about submitting transcripts is available in the Graduate Catalog; and
  2. Official test score reports for the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) and, for international applicants, the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Information about submitting official test scores is available from the Graduate Catalog. The ETS code for UTA is 6013; and
  3. Three Letters of Recommendation. Letters should attest to the applicant’s ability to do doctoral-level work and successfully complete the dissertation. Letters must be from references who hold a Ph.D. degree; and
  4. An essay from the applicant that discusses the student’s research agenda, identifies the faculty with whom the student will work, and states the reasons for pursuing a doctoral degree. The essay should be approximately 250 words. The essay is considered both for its content and writing quality.

Official transcripts and test scores must be sent directly to the Graduate School by the institution and ETS respectively. Letters of recommendation and personal essay should be sent directly to the CAPPA  College Recruiter via email or postal service, CAPPA RECRUITER, Box 19108, Arlington TX 76019. It is the applicant’s responsibility to ensure all application materials are received by the priority deadline of February 1. Incomplete applications or applications received after the deadline may be deferred.

CAPPA primarily admits doctoral students for the Ph.D. in Urban and Public Administration for fall semester only. Spring admissions are rare and there are no summer admissions.

Applicants who wish to be considered for graduate teaching assistant positions or other financial assistance, must submit their applications by their first week in February for full consideration. Only complete applications (including GRE scores and letters) will be considered for financial assistance. Students must also complete the university application for financial aid in mav ScholarShop.

ADMISSIONS CRITERIA

Applicants may be admitted unconditionally with a graduate GPA of 3.6, a Verbal GRE score of at least 153 (500 if taken before August 1, 2011 and a Quantitative GRE score of at least 144 (500 if taken before August 1, 2011). International applicants are required to have a score of 213 or higher on the TOEFL (550 or higher on the written TOEFL; 79 or higher on TOEFL iBT). Strength of letters of recommendation and quality of personal statement and Master’s degree field of study are also considered.

or

Applicants may be admitted unconditionally with a graduate GPA of 3.7, a Verbal GRE score of at least 153 (500 if taken before August 1, 2011 and a Quantitative GRE score of at least 140 (500 if taken before August 1, 2011). International applicants are required to have a score of 213 or higher on the TOEFL (550 or higher on the written TOEFL; 79 or higher on TOEFL iBT). Strength of letters of recommendation and quality of personal statement and Master’s degree field of study are also considered.

Applicants not admitted unconditionally may be considered for admission on probation based on factors mentioned above as well as multilingual proficiency, first generation graduate student and applicant’s community service experience. The doctoral admissions committee will set the probationary conditions.

The admissions committee may defer the admission decision when a component of the application is incomplete. It may also admit a student provisionally when an applicant is unable to supply all required documentation prior to the admission deadline but who otherwise appears to meet admission requirements.

CAPPA Inadequate Academic Progress Point System

A student may be subject to dismissal from the program if they accumulate 4 deficiency points during their Master’s degree or their Ph.D. Students who complete a Master’s degree at CAPPA will not carry deficiency points into their Ph.D. work. Deficiency points may not be removed from a student’s record by repeating a course or additional coursework.

D = 2 deficiency points
F = 3 deficiency points
I = 1 deficiency point
W = 0.5 deficiency point

A graduate student, whose cumulative grade point average (GPA) falls below a 3.000 in all graduate courses, be they graduate or undergraduate level and taken while enrolled as a UT Arlington graduate student, may be subject to dismissal from the program. (Reference: http://catalog.uta.edu/academicregulations/academicstanding/#graduatetext )

Ph.D. students who do not complete dissertation proposal within two years of passing comprehensive exam will accrue 2 deficiency points.

Ph.D. students who do not complete all requirements for the Doctoral degree within four years after passing the comprehensive examination will accrue 1 deficiency point per year beyond the four year mark.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Curriculum and Degree Requirements
 

Required Core Courses (24 hours)
PAPP 5305THEORIES OF URBAN SOCIETY3
PAPP 5306THE URBAN ECONOMY3
PAPP 5309LOCAL POLITICS IN THE INTERGOVERNMENTAL SETTING3
PAPP 5311PUBLIC POLICY FORMATION AND ANALYSIS3
PAPP 6315PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION THEORY3
PAPP 6320ADVANCED ORGANIZATION THEORY3
PAPP 6326PUBLIC BUDGETING & FINANCE3
PAPP 6349DECISION MAKING AND PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS3
Required Research Courses (12 hours)
PAPP 5344QUALITATIVE METHODS3
PAPP 5342INTERMEDIATE DATA ANALYSIS3
PAPP 6301THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS AND PH.D. WORKSHOP3
PLAN 6346ADVANCED DATA ANALYSIS IN URBAN AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS3
Selected Elective (3 hours)3
Dissertation (minimum 9 hours)9
Total Hours48

PUAD Students

First Year
First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHoursSummer SessionHours
PAPP 53053PAPP 53113Elective Course3
PAPP 53423PAPP 63153PAPP 53093
PAPP 63203PAPP 63463 
 9 9 6
Second Year
First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours 
PAPP 53063PAPP 63013 
PAPP 53443PAPP 63263 
 PAPP 63493 
 6 9
Third Year
First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours 
PAPP 6399, 6699, or 69993-9PAPP 6399, 6699, or 69993-9 
 3-9 3-9
Fourth Year
First SemesterHours  
PAPP 6399, 6699, or 739923-6  
 3-6
Total Hours: 48-63
1

Elective Course must be determined in consultation with your program/advisory chair and/or committee.

2

Student must complete 9hrs of Dissertation and/or enroll in PAPP 7399 (Final Dissertation) which must be taken in the final graduating semester.

ORGANIZATION

Notes on Curriculum and Degree Requirements
Students with the approval of their adviser may select substituted methods courses for the "required research courses." Listed "Selected Emphasis" courses are examples of possible classes. "
 

Comprehensive Exam and Dissertation

A Ph.D. student who fails to pass a comprehensive examination is allowed to retake the examination once. In this case, the exam must be retaken the following semester (excluding Summer semester). If the student fails to pass the examination a second time, the student is not permitted to continue in the doctoral program.

Upon successful completion of the written comprehensive exam students form a three-member faculty committee and prepare their dissertation proposal. Given the research topic and preparedness of the student, the faculty committee may recommend that the student take additional courses that contribute to the student’s dissertation. The student will defend a dissertation proposal before her/his committee.

Successful completion of the dissertation proposal advances the student to the status of candidacy (ABD). The student continues to work closely with her/his dissertation committee to the completion of the dissertation. 

Dissertation Proposal

Upon successful completion of the written comprehensive examination, students will work in preparation of their dissertation proposal. This preparation may include independent study or structured courses and is guided by the student’s Dissertation Committee. Students must also work closely with their dissertation supervisor and committee to develop their dissertation proposal. A formal oral proposal defense must be held, and the proposal must be formally approved by the dissertation committee before the student may continue to complete the dissertation. Guidelines for the dissertation proposal are available in the Ph.D. Student Handbook.

Dissertation

The dissertation represents the culmination of the student’s academic efforts and so is expected to demonstrate original and independent research activity and be a significant contribution to knowledge.

Upon the successful defense of their dissertation proposal, the student is required to submit an application to the UT Arlington’s Institutional Review Board if their research involves human subjects. Detailed information on the application process is available at: UTA’s Human Subjects Research

Doctoral students must enroll in a minimum of 3 dissertation hours (PAPP 6399 DISSERTATION ) every long semester (Fall & Spring). The student must accumulate a minimum of nine dissertation hours to graduate. Once the student’s committee has reviewed the completed dissertation and agree that the student is ready to defend, the student enrolls in PAPP 7399 DOCTORAL DEGREE COMPLETION / in the term designated as their completion term. Students may designate only one term as the completion term. Doctoral students who do not graduate at the end of their completion term will receive a grade of R, W or F and must enroll in a minimum of 6 hours of dissertation research (PAPP 6699 DISSERTATION ) every term until graduation.

The Office of Graduate Studies offers Dissertation Seminars each semester and encourages all Dissertation students to attend.

The dissertation defense is a public oral examination open to all members (faculty, students and invited guests) of the University community. Questioning of the candidate will be directed by the student’s dissertation committee. All members of the student’s committee must be present at the defense. Although the defense is concerned primarily with the dissertation research and its interpretation, the examining committee may explore the student’s knowledge of areas relevant to the core of the dissertation problem.

The dissertation defense may result in a decision that the candidate has:

  1. passed unconditionally;
  2. passed conditionally with remedial work specified by the committee;
  3. failed, with permission to be re-examined after a specified period; or
  4. failed and dismissed from the program.

The dissertation must be approved unanimously by the student’s dissertation supervising committee.

Graduate Certificates

Certificate in URBAN NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT

Certificate Advisor: Karolyn Field

Assistant Director for Academic and  Student Affairs / Advising Coordinator:Cheryl Donaldson

Certificate Coordinator: Dr. Karabi Bezboruah

The Urban Nonprofit Management Certificate is a 15 credit hours certificate which provides in-depth management training to nonprofit managers, staff, board members and volunteers to strengthen their management skills, administrative systems, and service delivery programs.

The Urban Nonprofit Management Certificate at The University of Texas at Arlington prepares students who are working in or are considering management careers in nonprofit organizations. The courses in this program address pertinent topics in entrepreneurship, leadership and management of the trillion dollar nonprofit sector that includes education, research, healthcare, art, culture, religion, social and human services, advocacy, legal services, international organizations, foundations, and mutual benefit professional and trade associations. Students from any department or discipline may elect to complete the certificate program. Upon completion, students will be prepared to assume key roles in any nonprofit institution.

The certificate requires completion of PAPP 5354 NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIPor and PAPP 5355 NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS IN PUBLIC POLICY or as well as three additional courses to be selected by the student with approval of the Urban Nonprofit Management certificate program adviser.

Required (6 hours)6
PAPP 5354NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP3
PAPP 5355NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS IN PUBLIC POLICY3
Selectives (9 hours)9
Select three courses from the following list of courses:
PAPP 5302FOUNDATIONS OF URBAN RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS3
PAPP 5309LOCAL POLITICS IN THE INTERGOVERNMENTAL SETTING3
PAPP 5311PUBLIC POLICY FORMATION AND ANALYSIS3
PAPP 5313COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT3
PAPP 5325ADMINISTRATIVE LAW3
PAPP 5329FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN THE PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT SERVICES3
PAPP 5345EVALUATION RESEARCH3
PAPP 5346BIG DATA AND PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS3
PAPP 5348COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS3
PAPP 5351HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN GOVERNMENT AND NON-PROFITS3
PAPP 5352CONFLICT RESOLUTION IN THE PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT3
PAPP 5357STRATEGIC MGT AND PLANNING IN PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT SERVICES3
PAPP 5367STRATEGIC PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT3
PAPP 5368PRACTICAL EMPLOYMENT FOR PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT MANAGERS3

Students who are already enrolled in a graduate degree program at U.T. Arlington, especially the campus or online MPA, need only declare their intent to enroll by submitting the appropriate application form to Dr. Karabi Bezboruah, the Urban Nonprofit Management Certificate Advisor. No prerequisite requirements are essential for these students.

Students who desire only to enroll in the Urban Nonprofit Management Certificate program but NOT in a graduate degree program may apply for admission to UT Arlington as a special student or "non-degree seeking" student. An undergraduate degree and grade point average of 3.0 shall be required. A GRE (graduate record examination) score and letters of recommendation are not necessary for admission to the Urban Nonprofit Management Certificate program. Any student that later seeks a graduate degree in a UT Arlington college or school may apply nine hours of coursework toward that degree within six years of completion and award of the Urban Nonprofit Management Certificate and by petition to the Graduate School through her or his prospective academic department. The acceptance or waiver of the remaining six hours taken as part of the requirements for the award of the Urban Nonprofit Management Certificate is at the discretion of each department.

Graduate students in any degree program at UT Arlington may register for Urban Nonprofit Management courses using standard registration procedures. It should be noted that class slots in the two core courses would be reserved for all of those Urban Nonprofit Management Certificate program participants who are accepted. Urban Nonprofit Management program students who are enrolled in other academic schools or colleges must obtain written course approval from their respective graduate advisors.

Professionals who desire to enroll in any or both of the core courses for continuing education hours may do so as special students. If at a later date these students decide to apply for the Urban Nonprofit Management Certificate program, the hours already taken as continuing education will be applied (within six years of completion of the courses) to the certificate program requirements.


Certificate in public budgeting and financial management

Certificate Advisor: Karolyn Field

Assistant Director for Academic and  Student Affairs / Advising Coordinator:Cheryl Donaldson

Certificate Coordinator: Dr. Alejandro Rodriguez

Sound fiscal management at all levels of government is essential for meeting the demands of an increasingly expensive and complex service-delivery need. The purpose of this 15 credit hours graduate certificate is provide students interested in public sector affairs and local government officials (budgeters, planners, finance analysts, and elected officials) with the skills to enable them to effectively support local government financial decision-making. Participants should expect to attain a comprehensive understanding of public budgeting and financial management practices and theories including knowledge of the various government revenue sources, major expenditures, and borrowing mechanisms used to finance long-life capital assets.

Students wishing to enroll only in the Graduate Certificate in Public Budgeting and Financial Management (certificate) but NOT to a graduate degree program may apply for admission to UT Arlington as a non-degree seeking student. A Bachelor’s degree with a GPA of 2.8 in the last 60 hours of undergraduate coursework is required for admission through the Graduate School. Students with GPAs lower than 2.8 may be recommended for admission by Alejandro Rodriguez, Ph.D., the Certificate Adviser, based on the following admission enhancing factors:

  1. the applicant’s work experience and level of responsibility;
  2. undergraduate degree in economics, financial management, accounting, or other closely related field; and
  3. two letters of recommendation.

Students already enrolled in a Master’s degree program, especially the campus and online MPA, at UT Arlington may enroll by submitting the appropriate application form to Dr. Alejandro Rodriguez and his or her academic graduate adviser. Students who have completed a Master’s degree may apply for admission to UT Arlington as a non-degree seeking student. In either case, a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Master’s degree work is required.

Participants must satisfactorily complete three required core courses and two elective courses from an approved list of elective courses, or by permission of the program adviser. Students shall be awarded the Graduate Certificate for Public Budgeting and Financial Management by the School of Urban and Public Affairs and the Graduate School upon satisfactory completion of the certificate requirements and a grade point average of 3.0.

Required (9 hours(9
PAPP 5326PUBLIC BUDGETING3
PAPP 5329FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN THE PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT SERVICES3
PAPP 5332PUBLIC CAPITAL BUDGETING3
Selectives (6 hours)6
Select two of the following:
PAPP 5302FOUNDATIONS OF URBAN RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS3
PAPP 5306THE URBAN ECONOMY3
PAPP 5312ECONOMIC POLICY3
PAPP 5321URBAN MANAGEMENT3
PAPP 5324URBAN PUBLIC FINANCE3
PAPP 5333GOVERNMENTAL AND NONPROFIT ACCOUNTING3
PAPP 5345EVALUATION RESEARCH3

Students who later seek graduate degrees at UT Arlington may apply 12 hours of certificate coursework within six years of completion and award of the certificate, with approval of the appropriate Graduate Studies Committee and the Dean of the Graduate School. Non-degree seeking students in the certificate program desiring to seek a degree must meet all admission requirements of the degree program.

Courses

PAPP 5160. URBAN MANAGEMENT/PLANNING INTERNSHIP. 1 Hour.

Intended to enhance readiness for professional work through exposure to planning practice in a one semester log internship (100 hrs in the spring or fall semester or 75 hrs in the summer). Integrates work experience and coursework through journaling and reflective practice. Requirements: (1)student secures an internship from a planning related employer and approval from the student's major professor prior to enrolling in the course;(2)the intern must provide performance evaluation by the job supervisor and the intern's evaluation of the internship experience. Enrollment open to students with no previous formal planning experience. Credit not available for previous internship or planning experience. P/F grade.

PAPP 5300. FOUNDATION OF URBAN THEORY. 3 Hours.

Social theories that explain the life cycle of urban communities as they develop, expand, and are sustained or decay are presented and contrasted. Special consideration is given to role of social policy. Topics such as poverty, race, neighborhoods, and environment are addressed.

PAPP 5301. FOUNDATIONS OF URBAN POLITICS AND ECONOMICS. 3 Hours.

Examines the major political and economic institutions and processes in urban communities and their effect on urban policy.

PAPP 5302. FOUNDATIONS OF URBAN RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

An introduction to research methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative, and statistical techniques useful in the analysis of urban trends and administrative programs.

PAPP 5303. THE METROPLEX: SURVEY OF URBAN AFFAIRS, PLANNING, ADMINISTRATION. 3 Hours.

The Metroplex provides an ideal laboratory for study with more than 100 cities and other governmental units, thousands of neighborhoods and business enterprises, major concentration of minorities and dozens of ethnic groups. An in-depth orientation on urban dynamics utilizing senior faculty members, governmental and community leaders, and current research reports and studies.

PAPP 5304. URBAN POLITICS. 3 Hours.

Examination of the city as a political system, including the impact of urbanization and fragmentation on policies; input dimensions, including voting patterns and interest group development; decision-making structures, especially types of community power structures and the impact of the reform movement on structural processes. Also offered as POLS 5305; credit will be granted only once.

PAPP 5305. THEORIES OF URBAN SOCIETY. 3 Hours.

Several theoretical perspectives of the community and community organization examined. Special emphasis given to theories from human ecology, organization and stratification, and social welfare.

PAPP 5306. THE URBAN ECONOMY. 3 Hours.

Internal dynamics of the growth and development of the urban system and its relation to the national economy. National and urban economic policy, urban growth and land use, market imperfections, urban financial issues, and the environmental implications of urban growth studied through lecture, game simulation and policy debates.

PAPP 5307. URBAN GEOGRAPHY. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes real aspects associated with urban physical environments and social, behavioral and financial processes that shape these environments.

PAPP 5308. URBAN HISTORY. 3 Hours.

Extensive reading primarily in the history of the urbanization and metropolitanization of the people of the United States. Historical methods as exemplified in the works of leading historians and analyzed; examples of the scholarship of selected historians and treatises on selected cities, regions, and urban institutions studied.

PAPP 5309. LOCAL POLITICS IN THE INTERGOVERNMENTAL SETTING. 3 Hours.

Critical analysis of the implications of federalism, and the changing nature of intergovernmental relations on state and local management, administration, planning, and policy making.

PAPP 5310. URBAN POLICY AND THE LAW. 3 Hours.

Critical analysis of federal government and selected state and local government policies and programs designed to influence the course of change and the future development of cities and urban areas. The role of "private" governments in affecting policy explored.

PAPP 5311. PUBLIC POLICY FORMATION AND ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

The course covers the policy process, policy formulation and provides an introduction to the tools and techniques of policy analysis, using multiple theoretical and analytical perspectives. The primary focus is on U.S. policy, with an emphasis on state and local policy issues. The course aims to provide students with a foundation in the theory, process, and tools of policy analysis, so that they are able to think critically about applied public policy problems and the role of policy analysts. Students will also gain practical skills in the development and presentation of policy analysis and recommendations.

PAPP 5312. ECONOMIC POLICY. 3 Hours.

Examines structure of the U.S. economic system and its impact on welfare of consumers, workers, and industry; public policy efforts to provide for management of critical economic variables are evaluated for effectiveness and equity as they impact different interest groups.

PAPP 5313. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT. 3 Hours.

Focuses on current problems of community development and neighborhood revitalization. Housing, community assets, the roles of community development corporations and social capital in cities, and community economic development will be analyzed. Federal, state, and local policies, with grassroots initiatives evaluated for effectiveness on promoting alternatives for community building and organizing. Also offered as PLAN 5324; credit will be granted only once.

PAPP 5314. HEALTH POLICY. 3 Hours.

Current health policy and programs, examination of historical development, economic and legal aspects, interest groups and health constituencies.

PAPP 5315. URBAN EDUCATION POLICY. 3 Hours.

Examines current education policy and programs, including public school districts, charter schools, and vouchers; economic and political aspects; role of adult education programs in improving human capital.

PAPP 5316. HUMAN SERVICES. 3 Hours.

Social welfare institutions: private and public; needs assessment, resource allocation, procedures, city/state/federal/private policy review; highlights of current system demands and changes. Offered as PLAN 5316 and PAPP 5344; credit will be granted only once.

PAPP 5317. ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the physical environmental dimensions of urbanization including such factors as pollution, waste disposal, and land use; stresses the role of economic, social, and political institutions as these affect environmental quality of the city. Offered as PLAN 5342 and PAPP 5317; credit will be granted only once.

PAPP 5318. SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY. 3 Hours.

Examines recent welfare reform measures (federal, state, and local levels), the political issues behind them, and their influence on urban life. A central topic will be the impact of a changing society on social welfare policy needs, including analyses of labor force participation and family structure.

PAPP 5319. URBAN PROBLEMS. 3 Hours.

Specific urban problems examined in depth, traced to their historical origins to see how they or similar problems have been dealt with in other times and places. Students will then propose possible solutions to the problems in their contemporary form. Offered as PLAN 5347 and PAPP 5319.

PAPP 5320. PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION THEORY. 3 Hours.

Historical evolution of administrative theory including classical, sociological and social-psychological dimensions; decision-making theory; implications of public interest theory for public and non-profit management; basic concepts of organization development and impact on public administration paradigms; new public administration; and future of public and nonprofit urban organization. Also offered as CRCJ 5309 and POLS 5303; credit will be granted only once.

PAPP 5321. URBAN MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Focuses through lectures, readings, and exercises on major administrative process: personnel and policy development and analysis; management styles and key contemporary management problems explored through presentations by prominent local practitioners.

PAPP 5322. POLITICS AND POLICY IN PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Development of theory of bureaucracy; bureaucracy as social issue; ethics and morality in public and non-profit bureaucracy; mobilization of special interest support; power differentials in urban agencies; policy process in bureaucracy; new bureaucratic structures and processes for urban policy making.

PAPP 5323. MANAGING CHANGE IN PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT SERVICES. 3 Hours.

Current theories and concepts of public and non-profit organizational change with particular emphasis on organization development and action research; theoretical roots of contemporary change literature traced through readings and discussion of classical organization theory, public administration including New Public Administration decision making, public interest, phenomenology, learning theory and general systems. Prerequisite: Basic organizational theory course or permission of instructor.

PAPP 5324. URBAN PUBLIC FINANCE. 3 Hours.

Local urban governments increasingly rely less and less on support from the state and federal governments. Many local governments rely heavily on a limited number of taxes and fees to finance services. This course explores the variety of revenue sources and fiscal problems of cities and local governments in metropolitan areas. This includes the topics of tax burden and tax equity. The second half of the course focuses on the unique challenges of financing the diversity of activities that cities in particular support, e.g. housing, transportation, economic and community development and human services. Offered as PAPP 5324 and PLAN 5329; credit will be granted only once.

PAPP 5325. ADMINISTRATIVE LAW. 3 Hours.

Examines scope and role of administrative regulation of and by governmental agencies; explores constitutional principles which limit administrative power and administrative law which governs classical areas of conflict between administrative agencies and their constituencies; rule-making, judicial review and informal regulatory processes of importance to public officials.

PAPP 5326. PUBLIC BUDGETING. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the principles and practices used by federal, state, and local governments to acquire and spend revenues within the context of American democracy, capitalism, federalism, and economics. The primary objective of this course is to provide students with the practical skills and theoretical knowledge to enable them to be effective participants in the budgeting process and critical consumers and producers of research relevant to public budgeting. Offered as PLAN 5328 and PAPP 5326. Credit will be granted only once.

PAPP 5327. COMPARATIVE ADMINISTRATION AND POLICY. 3 Hours.

Extensive, multidisciplinary exposure to concepts and models of administration in developed and modernizing countries; role of the military, bureaucracy and traditional elites in development; practices and concepts of strategies for effective change.

PAPP 5328. SMALL CITY MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on problems peculiar to small cities, including administrative law; personnel, planning; public works, public safety; human services; budget and finance; public relations and parks and recreation.

PAPP 5329. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN THE PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT SERVICES. 3 Hours.

Overview of the principles of finance as they apply to the public and non-profit services, financial reporting for state and local governments and non-profit organizations and evaluation.

PAPP 5330. COMMUNITY AND NEIGHBORHOOD ORGANIZATION. 3 Hours.

Structure and processes in the analysis and development of community and neighborhood organizations; special emphasis given to poverty and minority communities and neighborhoods.

PAPP 5331. LAND USE PLANNING AND THE LAW. 3 Hours.

Explores the law of land use in the context of the American legal, economic, and political systems. Examines leading court decisions and precedents for their background, content, and applicability to contemporary land use. Offered as PLAN 5316 and PAPP 5331. Credit will be granted only once.

PAPP 5332. PUBLIC CAPITAL BUDGETING. 3 Hours.

Examines governmental capital budgeting processes with a focus on understanding the significance of capital improvement planning, public facility investment, and project evaluation to sound infrastructure financing and regional economic growth. Governments purchase or construct long-lasting physical assets or facilities financed mostly through borrowing. This course aims to understand the rationale for public capital budgeting and debt instruments used to finance capital investment in the political context of public budgeting in America.

PAPP 5333. GOVERNMENTAL AND NONPROFIT ACCOUNTING. 3 Hours.

This course is designed as an introduction to governmental and nonprofit accounting. The course reviews major fund accounting principles, accounting for budgetary, revenue, and expenditure funds, accounting for general capital assets and long-term liabilities, accounting for fiduciary and proprietary funds, auditing practices, and financial reporting unique to government and non-profit organizations.

PAPP 5334. MANAGEMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the knowledge, organization, politics, issues, techniques and processes of local economic development. Emphasis is placed on contemporary issues and trends in the rich, dynamic laboratory of local economic development in Texas. Learning objectives include: 1) comprehension of basic techniques and issues such as strategic planning, leadership strategies, financial options and evaluation; 2) increased knowledge of the positive potential of thoughtful economic development for local environmental, infrastructure, and revenue challenges; and 3) enhanced professional development through individual and classroom exposure to successful practitioners.

PAPP 5341. PROFESSIONAL REPORT WRITING. 3 Hours.

The course aims to build professional writing skills. It reviews memo and report writing including grammatical construction, identifying and writing for a targeted audience, and writing in a clear, concise, and professional style. Also offered as PLAN 5335; credit will be granted for only one.

PAPP 5342. INTERMEDIATE DATA ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

An intermediate level examination of statistical and research techniques appropriate to urban and social analysis. Presuming a basic understanding of descriptive and inferential statistics, the course covers multivariate regression, including error analysis and non-linear models, path analysis, ANOVA, logit and probit models, and techniques for data reduction (e.g., factor analysis). Offered as PAPP 5342 and PLAN 5317; credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite: PAPP 5302.

PAPP 5343. APPLIED URBAN ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

Group and individual projects to develop research studies or strategies, data reports for local government, agency or citizen group; techniques appropriate to task utilized. P/F only.

PAPP 5344. QUALITATIVE METHODS. 3 Hours.

The study of qualitative research and analysis methods. Offered as PLAN 5346 and PAPP 5344; credit will be given only once.

PAPP 5345. EVALUATION RESEARCH. 3 Hours.

Methodological issues in evaluating public programs; identification of variables, indicators and analyses formats presented. Prerequisite: PAPP 5302.

PAPP 5346. BIG DATA AND PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

An examination of the data competencies and quantitative techniques necessary for policy analysis, with a special emphasis on big data and policy analysis. Increasingly, the rise and aggregation of what is commonly referred to as "big data" has raised many questions about the potential of this data for informing public policy as well as the tools and techniques appropriate for analysis. This course focuses on questions as to what constitutes big data, what sources of big data have relevance for public policy analysis, and concerns related to generalizability, reliability and validity. The course presumes a basic understanding of the basic statistical and research techniques taught in PAPP 5302 and PAPP 5342 (or equivalents from other departments). It builds on this foundation to analyze the tools and techniques appropriate for big data analysis in the field of public policy. The purpose of the course is to prepare students to understand what constitutes big data and evaluate the potential and limitations of its use in policy analysis. Students will be responsible for analyzing a source of big data, evaluating its research potential, and communicating the results of the analysis in a professional manner.

PAPP 5347. DEMOGRAPHIC METHODS. 3 Hours.

Examination of sources of data-census, vital statistics, special surveys, reports, special studies; techniques of analysis with particular emphasis on growth and projection models, interpretation of findings as a major policy area in urban analysis.

PAPP 5348. COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

Reviews theory of cost-benefit and cost-effective analyses; explores the research, measurement and methodological requirements for the assessments of costs and benefits. It is recommended that students have completed at least one graduate course in research and one graduate class in public finance.

PAPP 5349. RESEARCH DESIGN IN PUBLIC POLICY. 3 Hours.

Application of research issues, writing, and communication skills in public policy. Designed to assist students in preparing their research for master's thesis or project report. Also offered as PLAN 5380. Credit can only be granted once.

PAPP 5350. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. 3 Hours.

This is a graduate level introductory course designed to give students an understanding of public administration as a field of academic inquiry and professional practice within the context of American federalism, democratic values, institutional dynamics, and bureaucratic politics. In addition to contextually defining public administration, the course addresses government reform, intergovernmental relations, public ethics, organizational dynamics and behavior, personnel issues, budgeting, and e-governance.

PAPP 5351. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN GOVERNMENT AND NON-PROFITS. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with key functions of government and non-profit personnel systems, discuss various theoretical approaches and techniques, and understand the major legal requirements of public and non-profit personnel management. The course examines the structure, role, and evolution of the Civil Service, current personnel policies, and personnel management tasks such as examination, recruitment, position classification, and collective bargaining.

PAPP 5352. CONFLICT RESOLUTION IN THE PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Labor management at all levels of government and non-profits, ability to work together to solve problems. Emphasis on collective and interest based bargaining, mediation, labor management partnership. Simulation exercises teach dynamics of bargaining, negotiation, problem solving, and small group dynamics.

PAPP 5353. REFORM AND INNOVATION IN URBAN PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Designed to acquaint students with urban governance and non-profit reform and innovation. Course will explore how reformed government differs from traditional bureaucracy by contrasting it with entrepreneurial government and other innovations. Examines some of the areas most in need of reform, including service delivery, organizational capacity, and fiscal decentralization.

PAPP 5354. NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP. 3 Hours.

This course prepares students to be entrepreneurs, innovators and change leaders by using social entrepreneurship perspective to examine leadership and management practices of nonprofit organizations. Through hands-on experiential training, developing skills in needs assessment, and formulating interventions for social change, students develop a blueprint of a nonprofit organization that takes an innovative approach for sustainable solutions of social problems.

PAPP 5355. NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS IN PUBLIC POLICY. 3 Hours.

This course examines non-profits as community institutions with an outward focus: the political, economic, and inter-organizational environment, fund-raising and financial management, community relations and needs assessment, the role of the volunteers, boards and community leaders, marketing, and legal and government issues.

PAPP 5356. ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Public and non-profit entrepreneurship involves the use of public powers, and partnerships with individuals, firms and other organizations, to achieve public purposes. The focus will be on creative management techniques and methods employed in managing the public and non-profit sectors.

PAPP 5357. STRATEGIC MGT AND PLANNING IN PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT SERVICES. 3 Hours.

Readings and case studies of strategic planning and management in the public and non-profit sectors; application of principles to an actual situation, involving stakeholder identification, environmental scanning, and formulation of mission statements, goals, and strategies. Offered as PLAN 5312 and PAPP 5357. Credit will be granted only once.

PAPP 5358. ETHICS IN THE PUBLIC SERVICE. 3 Hours.

This course examines public service theoretical ethics literature to provide a basis for each student to both reflect upon and expand their comprehension of the values and processes of ethical decision making. Beyond theoretical works, it addresses the application and evaluation of theory against the professional, workaday reality of case studies, ethical codes and other relevant materials. Three major learning objectives are: 1) achievement of a solid understanding of the dominant theoretical perspectives in the public service ethics literature; 2) competency in the development of guidelines and procedures that encourage ethical behavior, and 3) enhancement of the reach and resiliency of each member's personal commitment to public service ethics.

PAPP 5359. ORGANIZATIONAL DIAGNOSIS. 3 Hours.

This class deals with tools and techniques necessary to manage public organizations. The learning objectives include ability to conduct an organizational diagnostic; and familiarity with group procedures and facilitation techniques involved in organizational change.

PAPP 5360. PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP. 3 Hours.

Designed to integrate work experience and coursework through a series of brief work-related assignments; presentations by local planning and management practitioners and class discussions and exercises. Enrollment is open to both pre-entry and in-career students. Formal internship placements with agency mentors will be arranged. P/F only.

PAPP 5361. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. 3 Hours.

The course focuses on the rise of governmental and nongovernmental organizations in geopolitics, international development, and environmental management. It analyzes their institutional histories, their organizational structures and cultures, and their role as institutional policy actors in the global diffusion of policy initiatives and managerial knowledge and practices.

PAPP 5362. URBAN DIVERSITY. 3 Hours.

Examines the growing spatial and social diversity of cities; how physical as well as socioeconomic urban structures have fostered race, class, and gender inequalities; how urban policies have addressed and can address these issues. Offered as PLAN 5362 and PAPP 5362.

PAPP 5363. CIVIL RIGHTS AND URBAN MINORITIES. 3 Hours.

Examines the changes in and growth of the civil rights of minorities in the United States from the close of the Civil War to the present. This is accomplished through the study of court decisions, legislation, and the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s, as seen through the eyes of contemporary writers, including William Faulkner, Alice Walker, and Alex Haley.

PAPP 5364. URBAN POLITICAL ECONOMY. 3 Hours.

Examines the theoretical bases of economic paradigms and the different economic policies that logically flow from them. Comparison is made between the orthodox, or neoclassical, model of economics and alternative heterodox models, including comparing the growth and development of the urban system, land use patterns, and economic policy debates. Consideration will be given to how and why the neoclassical model remains the dominant model for economic policy in Western, capitalist countries.

PAPP 5365. FOUNDATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY. 3 Hours.

Explores how environmental controversy is rooted in conflict between a number of schools of environmental policy thought with divergent perspectives on issues such as how to define progress, how to balance the needs of economy and ecosystem, how to cope with environmental complexity, and what role science should play in environmental affairs. Also offered as PLAN 5343; credit will be granted only once.

PAPP 5366. US IMMIGRATION POLICIES AND PLANNING FOR IMMIGRANTS. 3 Hours.

A seminar course where weekly readings would include: perspectives on international migration theory; the evolution of US immigration policy and national security; theories and urban issues related to immigrant assimilation and incorporation; urban ethnic economies and ethnic enclaves; segregation and housing of immigrants; globalization and immigrant labor networks; governance issues with providing education and other public services to immigrants and their children; and social work issues regarding generational conflict in immigrant families.

PAPP 5367. STRATEGIC PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to acquaint students with the theory and practice of strategically developing, utilizing, and aligning human resources so that maximum contribution from each member of an organization is used toward the attainment of strategic long-range goals and objectives. Topics include HR strategy, diversity, leadership, selection, training and development, compensation, classification, performance appraisal, and future practices for public and non-profit organizations.

PAPP 5368. PRACTICAL EMPLOYMENT FOR PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT MANAGERS. 3 Hours.

The course examines the rights and obligations of employers and employees. It does this by examining the legal background pertinent to public and nonprofit management. Topics addressed include employee selection, promotion and discipline, anti-discrimination legislation, gender and family issues legislation, environmental, safety and health issues, whistleblower legislation, immigration law, worker's compensation, labor law, and drug and alcohol issues.

PAPP 5390. TOPICS IN URBAN THEORY. 3 Hours.

Different topics explored on an intensive basis, especially recent theoretical approaches. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

PAPP 5391. TOPICS IN URBAN POLICY. 3 Hours.

Different topics and approaches in analysis of urban problems. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

PAPP 5392. TOPICS IN URBAN MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Selected topics on current management problems including small city management, community-neighborhood relations, citizen involvement programs and techniques, personal and professional effectiveness as a total person, intergovernmental strategies and styles, public-private sector collaboration and co-planning, privatization, and other alternatives to economic service delivery. May be repeated as topic changes.

PAPP 5394. SPECIAL TOPICS IN URBAN RESEARCH. 3 Hours.

Different topics each semester concentrate on a variety of methodological techniques and research strategies, such as demographic research and survey techniques. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

PAPP 5395. CONFERENCE COURSE IN URBAN AFFAIRS. 3 Hours.

Reading and research in a specialized area of urban affairs under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty.

PAPP 5396. PROJECT REPORT. 3 Hours.

Student prepares report focusing on specific policy or professional issue, utilizing appropriate research techniques; subject area and design of project report with consent of instructor. Graded P/F/R only.

PAPP 5397. RESEARCH REPORT. 3 Hours.

Student prepares report comparable to a journal article focusing on research issue, utilizing appropriate theory and research techniques; subject area and design of research report with consent of instructor. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: PAPP 5342.

PAPP 5398. THESIS. 3 Hours.

A thesis conforming to University and departmental requirements may be prepared by graduate students in urban affairs. Graded F, R.

PAPP 5399. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION CAPSTONE. 3 Hours.

This integrative applied research course assesses the student's ability to analyze, synthesize, and formulate cogent recommendations to solve a real public sector problem. Students will write the capstone paper using concepts drawn from the MPA core curriculum, their chosen emphasis track, and the student's professional public work experience. Students are required to successfully defend their capstone paper before a Public Administration Forum consisting of CAPPA faculty, students, and other interested parties. Prerequisite: Completion of all other course work required for the MPA degree, including core courses and emphasis area courses, unless an exception is approved by the MPA advisor.

PAPP 5698. THESIS. 6 Hours.

A thesis conforming to University and departmental requirements may be prepared by graduate students in urban affairs. Graded P/F/R.

PAPP 6301. THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS AND PH.D. WORKSHOP. 3 Hours.

Explores the development and function of theoretical models and frameworks. Examines the major theories from the social sciences designed for framing urban planning or administration issues and public policy. Designed to assist doctoral students in preparing their dissertation research. Opportunities to present work in progress, share ideas, and interact with faculty. Also offered as PLAN 6301; credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite: PLAN 5346; and PLAN 5317 or PAPP 5342.

PAPP 6305. SEMINAR IN URBAN POLICY PROCESSES. 3 Hours.

Final course in urban policy field; focus on the political, economic, and sociological institutions in the policy process, including various theoretical approaches, and application of these multidisciplinary perspectives in the analysis of specific policy issues.

PAPP 6306. SEMINAR IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. 3 Hours.

Final course in the public administration field, focuses on review and integration of the theories and principles of public administration.

PAPP 6310. MONETARY AND FISCAL POLICY: THE FEDERAL ROLE. 3 Hours.

Examination of the role of the federal government in maintaining economic stability, ensuring full employment and controlling inflation; exploration of liberal interventionist, conservative and radical theories of state economic management to assess the various policy alternatives and the importance of interest groups.

PAPP 6315. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION THEORY. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to critically examine public administration theory through the lenses of various governance models that have been proposed beginning with Weber's "ideal"; bureaucratic model through Osborne and Gaebler's market model to Fox and Miller's postmodern discourse model. The course begins by examining each governance model's stated or implied assumptions (about man, government, state, etc.) Second, the course considers the political philosophy and conceptual pillars on which the models are theoretically founded. Finally, the course examines the ideas of what constitutes a state as it might be relevant to a particular model and public administration.

PAPP 6320. ADVANCED ORGANIZATION THEORY. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this advanced seminar is to examine the role of public agencies as organs of the State. It focuses on federal, urban, and nonprofit organizations. Learning objectives include understanding of interpretive, critical, and postmodern critiques of State's institutions; and application of power, knowledge, and gender lenses to the analysis of organizational practices, culture, and policy actions. Prerequisite: PAPP 5320 or PAPP 5323.

PAPP 6326. PUBLIC BUDGETING & FINANCE. 3 Hours.

The primary objective of this seminar is to provide students with the theoretical underpinnings of budgeting and financial management in the public sector. Students will engage in in-depth discussions of public budgeting and financial management topics drawn from economics, decision-making models, urban politics, federalism, and others to be able to have a sound understanding of how fiscal decisions affect public administration and policy.

PAPP 6340. RESEARCH DESIGN. 3 Hours.

Advanced course especially for Ph.D. students; covers logic of research design and problems of structure. Emphasis on empirical and quantitative studies.

PAPP 6346. ADVANCED DATA ANALYSIS IN URBAN AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS. 3 Hours.

An introduction to selected advanced techniques related to planning analysis. Subjects include advanced applied regression analysis, multivariate logit analysis, and multinomial logistic regression. Applications of projection techniques, land use and transportation models, and methods of regional analysis. Offered as PLAN 6346 and PAPP 6346. Credit will be given only once.

PAPP 6349. DECISION MAKING AND PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

This course explores the theoretical, practical, and topical connections between public policy and public administration through a decision-making lens. The objectives of the course are to enable students to identify, critique, and connect the theoretical and meta-theoretical assumptions of decision-making models to models of public policy analysis and public administration. Course objectives will be pursued through readings, seminar discussions, and research-based assignments that focus on the intersection between decision-making, public policy, and public administration.

PAPP 6399. DISSERTATION. 3 Hours.

Graded F/R only.

PAPP 6699. DISSERTATION. 6 Hours.

Graded F/R/P/W only.

PAPP 6999. DISSERTATION. 9 Hours.

Graded P/F/R.

PAPP 7399. DOCTORAL DEGREE COMPLETION. 3 Hours.

This course may be taken during the semester in which a student expects to complete all requirements for the doctoral degree and graduate. Enrolling in this course meets minimum enrollment requirements for graduation, for holding fellowships awarded by The Office of Graduate Studies and for full-time GTA or GRA positions. Students should verify that enrollment in this course meets other applicable enrollment requirements. To remain eligible in their final semester of study for grants, loans or other forms of financial aid administered by the Financial Aid Office must enroll in a minimum of 5 hours as required by the Office of Financial Aid. Other funding sources may also require more than 3-hours of enrollment. Additional hours may also be required to meet to requirements set by immigration law or by the policies of the student's degree program. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office, other sources of funding, Office of International Education and/or their graduate advisor to verify enrollment requirements before registering for this course. This course may only be taken once and may not be repeated. Students who do not complete all graduation requirements while enrolled in this course must enroll in a minimum of 6 dissertation hours (6699 or 6999) in their graduation term. Graded P/F/R.