Graduate

Each graduate student must complete degree requirements in accordance with the catalog in effect at the time the student entered the graduate program in which the degree will be awarded or, at the student's option, the catalog of any subsequent year in which the student was in residence.

Please note that changes in University regulations and policies become effective for all enrolled students in the year for which the catalog is in effect, regardless of the year of initial enrollment. Thus, students may choose to satisfy degree requirements specified in an earlier catalog, but all must observe University regulations and follow graduation procedures prescribed in the catalog in effectforce in the intended semester of graduation.

Enrollment Requirements

All students must be enrolled in their graduate program in any term in which they are completing graduate degree requirements including taking the final master's exam, conducting research, or defending a thesis or dissertation. Enrollment in courses outside the major and minor fields will not satisfy enrollment requirements. Enrolled students who do not complete all requirements by the beginning of the next long semester must enroll to complete remaining degree requirements.

Funded Students

Funded students are normally expected to be enrolled as full time students while holding an assistantship or associateship. Master's students who must enroll in a six-hour thesis course or doctoral students who must enroll in a six or nine-hour dissertation course or three-hour dissertation completion course because they have not received a passing grade in one of these courses must enroll in one of these courses and receive a grade of P in their final semester. However, master's students who need fewer hours to complete their degrees may petition for a waiver of full time enrollment as described in the Assistantship/Associateship Policy section of this catalog.

Credit Toward Degrees and Certificates

Only courses completed with a grade of A, B, C, or P can satisfy graduate degree or certificate requirements. However, courses in which grades of D or F are earned will affect a student's grade-point average. A student must have a B (3.0) grade-point average in courses included in their degree plan and a B (3.0) average in all work undertaken as a graduate student to have credits applied toward a graduate degree or certificate.

Credit for Repeated Courses

A student may repeat a course only if that course is specifically designated in this catalog as one that can be repeated for credit. A student who fails to receive credit (earns a grade of D or F) may repeat the course in order to obtain credit, in which case the grades for both attempts will count in computing the student's overall grade-point average. No student will be allowed to repeat a course in order to change a passing grade of C or higher.

Course Credit Applied to More Than One Degree

No course that has been applied to any degree, at any graduate or undergraduate institution, may be applied to any other degree, either directly or by substitution except in approved dual degree or approved fast track programs. The amount of shared credit between degrees in dual degree programs is limited and varies with the total number of hours needed to complete both degrees. Similarly, the amount of credit that can be shared in fast track programs is also limited. Details may be found in descriptions provided by participating programs elsewhere in this catalog.

Credit for Advanced Undergraduate Coursework

Up to nine hours of advanced undergraduate credit from UT Arlington or another institution may be applied to a master's degree program if the hours have not been used to earn a previous degree and have the approval of the appropriate Graduate Studies Committee and the Academic Dean. Approved fast track programs may allow dual credit.

Earning Graduate Course Credit as a UT Arlington Undergraduate Student

Courses taken in undergraduate status may not be applied directly to a doctoral program.

Some departments do not permit students to enroll in graduate courses unless they have been admitted to a graduate program. Others allow students enrolled as undergraduates to take a limited amount of graduate coursework under the conditions described below.

All undergraduate students should consult with the appropriate graduate advisor before attempting to register for graduate courses.

Advanced UT Arlington Undergraduates (Current Seniors)

An undergraduate student at the University of Texas at Arlington may not use graduate courses (numbered 5000 and above) to fulfill undergraduate degree requirements except as part of an approved fast track program. However, an undergraduate needing no more than 12 hours in one term (six semester hours in one summer session) to complete all the requirements for a bachelor's degree may register for graduate courses and apply them toward a master's degree at UT Arlington under the following conditions:

  1. In no case may a student previously dismissed from or denied admission to a graduate program enroll in graduate courses or reserve courses for graduate credit.
  2. All work for undergraduate credit must be completed during that term in which the student initially enrolls in graduate courses.
  3. Total registration for all work may not exceed 15 semester hours in a term (or 12 semester hours in the summer sessions).
  4. The student must submit to the graduate advisor a "Reservation of Courses for Graduate Credit by Undergraduate Students" form (available from graduate advisors). The reservation must be approved by the graduate advisor and the Academic Dean.  The Office of Records and Registration must certify that the reserved credit will not be applied to the student's undergraduate degree requirements.
  5. The student must have at least a 3.0 undergraduate GPA to be eligible to enroll in a graduate course and to reserve it for graduate degree credit.
  6. Courses taken at UT Arlington and reserved for graduate credit may be applied to a master's degree program only if a grade of A, B, C, or P was earned.
  7. Credit is officially accepted for application to a graduate program when a student is unconditionally admitted to UT Arlington.
  8. A maximum of 12 semester hours of graduate level courses may be reserved.

Students Holding Bachelor or Higher Degrees Enrolled as Degreed Undergraduates

Students who have completed their undergraduate studies and have been awarded their bachelor's degree may enroll as degreed undergraduates in graduate-level course work and receive graduate credit at UT Arlington under the following conditions:

  1. Courses taken at UT Arlington and reserved for graduate credit may be applied to a master's degree program only if a grade of A, B, C, or P was earned.
  2. No more than 12 semester hours of credit earned while a degreed undergraduate may be applied for credit toward a master's degree. Students must file a request, approved by the graduate advisor, the Committee on Graduate Studies, and the Academic Dean to apply such credits toward a graduate degree.
  3. All courses that are applied to a master's degree must have been completed no more than five years before enrollment in a graduate program at UT Arlington. If the student has completed more than 12 semester hours of graduate courses in undergraduate status, only graduate courses completed within five years of enrollment in a graduate program at UT Arlington will become part of the graduate record and considered in computing the student's grade-point average.
  4. A student may elect to apply all graduate courses completed in the last five years toward their degree or to apply none of this work. Selective application of courses is not permitted. If any courses are applied for credit toward a master's degree, all courses completed within the last five years will become part of the graduate record.
Credit for courses taken as a non-degree seeking graduate student

Up to 12 graduate level (5000 and above) semester credit hours earned as a special non-degree seeking student may be applied to a graduate degree program, subject to graduate grading practices. Review and approval of the appropriate Committee on Graduate Studies and the approval of Graduate Admissions are required. All grades in courses taken as a special non-degree seeking student and graduate certificate status will be considered in computing a student's graduate grade-point average.

Graduate Credit for Extension Classes

Extension courses taken for credit may be applied toward an advanced degree upon evaluation.  Credit for extension course work is limited to six credit hours.

Courses That Do Not Provide Graduate Credit

  • Personal Improvement Courses: Personal improvement individual or group music or art lessons and exercise and sports activities courses can not be used for the following: 1) to satisfy graduate degree requirements; 2) meet enrollment requirements; 3) in computation of graduate grade-point averages or determination of academic probation or academic good standing; 4) in calculation of grade-point averages for the purpose of admission to a Graduate Program or for certification for graduation from a Graduate Program.
  • Audited Classes: University credit is not granted for audited classes and audited classes will not satisfy enrollment requirements.
  • Correspondence Courses: Correspondence courses are not accepted for graduate credit.
  • Credit by Examination: Credit by examination may not be used for graduate credit and no such credit, graduate or undergraduate may appear on graduate student transcripts.

Transfer Credit and Course Waivers

Transfer Credit Applied to Master's Degrees

Equivalent coursework completed at other institutions of recognized standing may be transferred to a master's degree program after evaluation and approval. Transferred courses do not appear on the UT Arlington Official Transcript and grades earned in transferred courses are not included in calculating a student's UT Arlington graduate grade-point average.

No more than nine hours of transfer credit will be granted except in the professional master's programs that require more than 36 hours of coursework. In such programs, the number of transfer hours is limited to 25 percent of the total program hours. This rule does not invalidate agreements that are stated elsewhere in this catalog. Transfer credit will be accepted only for organized courses in which the student received a letter grade of B or higher and an official transcript showing the course(s) and grade(s) is required.

Courses from other universities taken after a student has been admitted into a master's program at UT Arlington must be approved in advance by the appropriate graduate advisor and Committee on Graduate Studies. All work submitted for transfer credit must have been completed no more than six years before completion of a graduate program at UT Arlington. A list of approved credit must be sent to the Office of Records and Registration to be posted to the student's university record.

Waiving Courses Required for Doctoral Degrees

Graduate-level coursework completed in the student’s major area of doctoral study at institutions of recognized standing that grant doctoral degrees in those subject areas may serve to establish the student’s competency in equivalent UT Arlington courses. Competency demonstrated by successful completion of equivalent courses may provide a basis for waiving some UT Arlington course requirements and the credit hours associated with those courses.

Waivers must be recommended by the student’s graduate advisor and current supervising professor and their recommendation must be approved by both the Committee on Graduate Studies of the student’s major area. Only courses in which the student has earned a B (3.0) or better (or a P if the UTA course is also graded P/F) will be considered for purposes of a waiver. In no case will final semester Dissertation course (6x99 or 7399) requirements be waived. An approved list of waived courses must be sent to the Office of Records and Registration to be posted to the student's university record.

Transfer Credit Applied to Graduate Certificates

Equivalent coursework completed at other institutions of recognized standing may be transferred to a master's degree program after evaluation and approval. Transferred courses do not appear on the UT Arlington Official Transcript and grades earned in transferred courses are not included in calculating a student's UT Arlington graduate grade-point average.

The number of transfer units is limited to 50% of the total units required for the certificate, except in certificate programs that exceed 15 units, in which case 12 of those units must be taken in residence. This rule does not invalidate written agreements stated elsewhere in this catalog. Transfer credit will be accepted only for organized courses in which the student received a letter grade of B or higher and an official transcript showing the course(s) and grade(s) is required.

Courses from other universities taken after a student has been admitted into a master's program at UT Arlington must be approved in advance by the appropriate graduate advisor and Committee on Graduate Studies. All work submitted for transfer credit must have been completed no more than six years before completion of a graduate program at UT Arlington. A list of approved credit must be sent to the Office of Records and Registration to be posted to the student's university record.

Departmental, Program and College Program Manuals for Students

Many departments and programs issue program manuals, procedures and policy manuals, graduate student handbooks, and other informational publications for students and faculty in graduate programs. These publications may provide detailed and useful information; however, they are not statements of official policy of the University of Texas at Arlington nor of the University of Texas System. In all matters the Rules and Regulations of the Board of Regents of The University of Texas System, the Handbook of Operating Procedures of the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Texas at Arlington Catalog shall supersede departmental, program or college publications.

Master's Degree Requirements

Degree requirements and academic performance standards given in this section are the minimum required. Satisfying these general requirements and standards, however, does not imply that all degree and program requirements have been met. Many programs set special course requirements and may require higher grade-point averages or other academic standards than those given in this section. Such program requirements and standards are included in individual program descriptions in this catalog and in departmental and college program manuals or policy statements. These special requirements shall not be considered in conflict with this catalog and shall have the same force as this catalog.

Degree Plans and Required Hours

Three degree plans (thesis, thesis substitute and non-thesis) leading to the master's degree are available. All programs, except those in Education and Public Administration, offer the thesis degree plan. In certain departments and programs, a student may follow a thesis substitute or non-thesis degree plan upon recommendation of the appropriate graduate advisor. Plans available in each department or program are listed in the department-specific page of the catalog.

The thesis degree plan requires a minimum of 30 semester hours, of which at least 24 must be in coursework and 6 in a thesis course. The thesis must be approved by the thesis advisor and by a supervising committee of three or more members appointed by the Academic Dean. Students receiving advice and assistance from a faculty member in the preparation of a thesis must register for the appropriate course even if they are not on campus. Each term, after consulting with their graduate advisor, students must register for the amount of thesis credit commensurate with the efforts to be expended by the student and the thesis advisor in the preparation of the thesis. Once the student is enrolled in the thesis course, continuous enrollment is required. The student must be enrolled in six hours of thesis during the term in which the thesis is defended and the final Master's Examination is unconditionally passed. The degree candidate must defend the thesis in a final oral examination open to all members of the faculty.

The thesis substitute degree plan requires a minimum of 33 semester hours, of which at least 27 must be in coursework and 3 in an appropriate project or research course. The thesis substitute may include: 1) internship reports in programs in which the internship has been determined to be an essential component; 2) reports prepared in certain graduate seminar, conference or research courses; or 3) a design thesis in Architecture. The internship substitute requires a minimum of six semester hours in the internship course.

The non-thesis degree plan requires a minimum of 36 semester hours of coursework, of which at least 24 must be in the major area(s) of study.

Time Limit

Programs for the master's degree must be completed within six years (time in military service excluded) from initial registration in a graduate degree program. Students who exceed the published time limits for completing the graduate degree but wish to graduate, must petition the Academic Dean for an exception to the time limit policy. 

Residence

All degree seeking graduate students must meet residency goals reflecting scholarly engagement and immersion in research, scholarship, creative work and professional development in his or her degree program. Residency requirements can be met through one of three mechanisms:

  • The equivalent of two terms of full-time enrollment:    Students completing residency via enrollment should understand that the goals of residency are focused effort in activities related to their degree.
  •  Program-specific alternative residency plan:  Academic degree programs may have alternative methods by which enrolled students achieve residency goals. These alternatives, if any, are described in an academic program’s description of its degree requirements.  Such plans must  have prior approval  by the Associate Vice Provost for Academic Programs and Curricula. 
  • Individual alternative residency plan:  Proposals for alternative residency from individual students can be submitted for approval by the Associate Vice Provost for Academic Programs and Curricula.

Foreign Language Requirement

A reading knowledge of at least one foreign language (classical or modern) is required by some departments or programs for master's degree candidates. Specific language requirements, if any, are given in the individual departmental and program degree descriptions.

Supervising Committees

The Academic Dean will appoint for each master's student a supervising committee upon recommendation by the graduate advisor and the appropriate Committee on Graduate Studies. The committee will normally consist of at least three members of the graduate faculty and will be responsible for the design of the student's program. One qualified external person who is not a member of the graduate faculty may serve as a voting member of a supervising committee if nominated by the appropriate Committee on Graduate Studies and approved by the Dean. The nomination form is available online and must be submitted by the student's department to the Office of Graduate Studies along with the nominee's curriculum vitae. Any external, non-voting members must be in addition to the three voting members and must be approved by the Academic Dean. The supervising committee conducts the final thesis examination for thesis degree plan candidates and determines scope, content and form of the final master's comprehensive examination for thesis substitute and non-thesis degree plan candidates.

Final Master's Examination

A final program examination is required for all master's degree candidates. The final master's examination can result in: 1) an unconditional pass with a recommendation to the Academic Dean that the candidate be certified to receive the earned degree; 2) a conditional pass with the requirement that additional conditions be met, which may include further work on the thesis or thesis substitute, additional coursework with a minimum specified grade-point average, or both (in all cases, the final master's examination must be repeated within a specified period); 3) failure, with permission to be re-examined after a specified period; or 4) failure, with recommendation to the Academic Dean that the candidate be dismissed from the program. Most programs limit to two the number of repeats of the final master's examination.

For thesis degree plan candidates, the examination will be an oral defense of the thesis. The examination will be conducted by all members of the student's supervising committee but will be open to all members of the faculty. The thesis examining committee must have copies of the thesis at least two weeks prior to the thesis defense. Thesis degree plan candidates must submit an electronic copy of the unconditionally passed thesis to the Library following the procedures for electronic submission.

For thesis substitute or non-thesis degree plan candidates, the final examination will be a comprehensive examination that is written, oral or both. The scope, content and form of the examination(s) is to be determined and administered by all members of the student's supervising committee. Some programs require successful completion of a specified course in the final term of study to satisfy this requirement.

The Final Master's Examination Report must be filed no later than three weeks before the date on which the candidate expects the degree to be conferred.

Master's Thesis

All master's students in the thesis option must be aware of requirements, components and deadlines associated with the thesis, final defense, and submission of the thesis to the Library. Thesis format review and approval by the Library are required and must be completed by the published deadlines in order to graduate from UT Arlington.

Enrollment Requirement

A thesis degree plan student must be enrolled in the appropriate thesis course in the term in which the thesis is defended. Social work students will enroll in SOCW 6393 to conduct thesis research and SOCW 6398 in the term in which the thesis is defended. All other thesis option students must be enrolled in the appropriate 6 hour thesis course in the term in which the thesis is defended.

Thesis Manuscript Preparation

Students pursuing a thesis option master's degree must have the format of the thesis manuscript approved before the degree can be conferred. The Library specifically checks the document for conformity to UT Arlington formatting requirements. Details regarding thesis formatting requirements can be found on the UT Arlington Library website.

Mechanical Check

The format of all theses must be reviewed and approved by the Library before the theses will be accepted as satisfying the thesis requirement of the Master's degree. Master's thesis students must submit a copy of their thesis electronically to the ETD Coordinator in the UT Arlington Library for a complete review of the format of the entire manuscript. This review is called the mechanical check. Students may be required to resubmit the document for additional checks depending on the nature and number of formatting errors found. The thesis submitted for mechanical check should be complete and as near to being in final format as possible.

Final Submission

After the thesis has been through the required mechanical check process and has been approved by the student's committee and the Library, the final copy of the thesis must be submitted via the University's electronic submission process. The final thesis is University property and a student may make no private agreements with employers, funding sources, or others that restrict or infringe upon University rights. Thesis copyrights, where applicable, are held by the student author. The thesis will be archived by the Library and be available to interested members of the public. Under some circumstances (see https://library.uta.edu/sites/default/files/TD_Embargo_Policy.pdf )  a student may request to delay publication of the thesis for a limited period of time.  Thesis fees are explained in the Tuition and Fees section of the Catalog.

Thesis Defense

The thesis defense will be a public oral examination open to all members of the faculty. Questioning of the candidate will be directed by the student's thesis supervising committee. All members of the student's committee must be present at the defense.

Although the defense is concerned primarily with the thesis research and its interpretation, the examining committee may explore the student's knowledge of areas relevant to the core of the thesis problem. The thesis defense may result in a decision that the candidate has 1) passed unconditionally; 2) passed conditionally with remedial work specified by the committee; 3) failed, with permission to be re-examined after a specified period; or 4) failed and dismissed from the program. The thesis must be approved unanimously by the student's thesis supervising committee and by the Academic Dean. Regardless of the outcome of the defense, the thesis defense results must be submitted to the Office of Records and Registration.

Dual Degrees

Students may pursue dual degree programs other than those specifically defined in the catalog with prior approval of the appropriate Committees on Graduate Studies and the Academic Dean.

Students in any dual degree program must be admitted to each participating program. Unless otherwise stated under the dual degrees programs specified elsewhere in this catalog, the number of hours that may be used jointly will be determined by the total number of hours required by both degree programs if completed separately. For purposes of dual degree programs, the total number of semester hours required for both degrees if completed separately is defined as the number of semester hours required for a student to complete all advanced degree requirements (excluding deficiency, leveling and prerequisite courses) for both degrees.

  1. Six semester hours may be used jointly when the total number of hours required for both degrees is 60;
  2. Six to 12 semester hours may be used jointly when the total number of hours required for both degrees is between 60 and 72 hours;
  3. Six to 18 semester hours may be used jointly when the total number of hours required for both degrees exceeds 72 hours.

Admission to and enrollment in the programs for a dual degree must be concurrent. Students must be admitted to the second program before completing more than 24 semester hours in the first program, exclusive of leveling, deficiency or foundation courses, and must complete the second degree within three academic years following completion of the first.

All grades earned in dual degree status are used for purposes of determining academic good standing, academic probation and graduate requirements.

Students must be in good standing in both programs to continue in a dual degree program. Students who are dismissed from either program are no longer considered to be in a dual degree program. These students may enroll in and use courses for credit toward the degree program in which they are in good standing only. Students may not take courses in the program from which they have been dismissed and may not use such courses for dual degree credit.

Dual degree programs are available at the master's level only. Not all graduate programs participate in dual degrees.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) is the highest degree offered by The University of Texas at Arlington. The degree is awarded only for academic work of distinction through which the student demonstrates superior scholarship and capacity for original work. Requirements for the doctoral degree listed below are the minimum required. Meeting all of these requirements does not result automatically in the awarding of the doctoral degree. All departments and programs have additional requirements for a high level of scholarly achievement that must be met by successful doctoral candidates. In all doctoral programs, the basic requirements are that a student 1) attain mastery of a field of knowledge as determined by the appropriate Committee on Graduate Studies and demonstrated in a general examination; and 2) present evidence of a capacity to complete a significant program of original research by preparation of a dissertation.

To be admitted to a doctoral program, an applicant must have completed a master's degree or at least 30 semester credit hours of graduate coursework.

Degree Plans and Required Hours

The doctoral degree cannot be earned solely by passing certain courses and accumulating a specified number of credit hours; however, a department or program may require a core group of courses for all of its doctoral students. Courses are generally concentrated in the student's major field, but some are normally taken in one or more complementary minor fields. In interdepartmental programs, the major work may be divided among two or more primary fields.

The University  imposes no specific semester-hour requirements for the doctoral degree except for residence requirements included in individual degree program descriptions.

Time Limit

All requirements for the doctoral degree must be completed within four years after the student unconditionally passes the comprehensive exam. Students who exceed the published time limits for completing the graduate degree but wish to graduate, must petition the Academic Dean for an exception to the time limit policy. 

Residence

All degree seeking graduate students must meet residency goals reflecting scholarly engagement and immersion in research, scholarship, creative work and professional development in his or her degree program. Residency requirements can be met through one of three mechanisms:

  • The equivalent of two terms of full-time enrollment:    Students completing residency via enrollment should understand that the goals of residency are focused effort in activities related to their degree.
  •  Program-specific alternative residency plan:  Academic degree programs may have alternative methods by which enrolled students achieve residency goals. These alternatives, if any, are described in an academic program’s description of its degree requirements.  Such plans must  have prior approval  by the Associate Vice Provost for Academic Programs and Curricula. 
  • Individual alternative residency plan:  Proposals for alternative residency from individual students can be submitted for approval by the Associate Vice Provost for Academic Programs and Curricula.

Foreign Language Requirement

Prior to scheduling the doctoral comprehensive examination, the University requires evidence that the student has a reading knowledge of one foreign language applicable to the student's field of study or has attained proficiency in a research-tool area such as computer sciences or experimental statistics.. The foreign language requirement may be met by 1) successfully passing an examination prepared by an appointee of the Academic Dean; 2) making an acceptable score on the Educational Testing Service Graduate School Foreign Language Test; or 3) earning a grade of B or higher in French, German or Russian 4331 and 4332, or equivalents. The foreign language substitute research tool requirement may be met by a method determined by the appropriate Committee on Graduate Studies and approved by the Academic Dean. Other suitable substitutes may be approved by the Committee on Graduate Studies and  Academic Dean.

Diagnostic Evaluation

During the student's first year of doctoral program work the student must demonstrate potential to successfully complete a degree program. The method of assessing the student's potential will be determined by the appropriate Committee on Graduate Studies and may be in the form of a written or oral examination, personal interviews with faculty members, successful completion of certain courses in the first semester of residence, or by any combination of these methods. Results of the diagnostic evaluation may be 1) approval to continue in the doctoral program; 2) approval to continue with specified remedial work; 3) failure, but with permission for assessment through a second diagnostic evaluation after a specified period; or 4) failure and termination in the program. The student must be enrolled in the graduate program in the term in which he/she completes the diagnostic evaluation.

The results of the diagnostic evaluation must be filed in the Records and Registration Office no later than after completion of 18 semester hours of coursework while enrolled in a doctoral program at UT Arlington .

After the student successfully completes the diagnostic evaluation, the Academic Dean will approve an examining committee. Members for the committee are recommended by the graduate advisor and appropriate Committee on Graduate Studies. The committee will consist of no fewer than 3 voting members, at least two of whom must be from the student's major area. Committees in interdisciplinary programs must include at least four voting members with two members coming from each discipline. Individual programs may require the committee to have more members and students must conform to such requirements. One qualified external person who is not a member of the graduate faculty may serve as a voting member of a supervising committee if nominated by the appropriate Committee on Graduate Studies and approved by the Graduate Studies Office. Any external, non-voting members must be in addition to the required number of voting members. Students should consult with their program's graduate advisor to make sure their committees have sufficient membership to meet program requirements.

The committee is responsible for design and direction of the student's program.

Comprehensive Examination

Students are eligible to take the comprehensive examination after giving evidence to their doctoral committee of adequate academic achievement by having completed all or most coursework requirements for a degree. The comprehensive examination usually marks the end of formal coursework and the beginning of concentrated work on dissertation research and preparation. The student must be enrolled in the term in which he/she takes the comprehensive examination.

The comprehensive examination may be written, oral, or both. Its scope, content, and form are determined by the student's examining committee with approval of the appropriate Committee on Graduate Studies.

In some departments and programs comprehensive examinations are given semiannually so students should consult their graduate advisor in that program for appropriate regulations and procedures.

The comprehensive examination may result in 1) unconditional pass and recommendation to proceed to the next phase of the program; 2) approval to remain in the program, but required to meet certain specified additional criteria; 3) failure, but with permission to retake the examination after a period specified by the examining committee; or 4) failure and dismissal from the program.

Dissertation

The dissertation represents the culmination of the student's academic efforts and so is expected to demonstrate original and independent research activity and be a significant contribution to knowledge.

All doctoral students must be aware of requirements and deadlines associated with the dissertation, final defense, and submission of the final copy of the dissertation.

Enrollment Requirements

  1. Registration in an independent study, research, or similar course implies an expected level of effort on the part of the student that is at least equivalent to that of an organized course of the same credit value.
  2. Doctoral students will not be required to register for more than nine credit hours during any term with these exceptions:
    1. Doctoral students who are enrolled in nine credit hours of organized courses and who are also doing research related to their dissertation may be required to register for up to three hours of research for a total of 12 credit hours.
    2. Doctoral students supported as a graduate research or teaching assistants may be required to register for 12 credit hours (no more than nine credit hours to be in organized courses), as determined by the students' graduate program.
  3. Doctoral students who are required to register solely to satisfy the continuous enrollment requirement may register 3 credit hours during each term.
  4. Doctoral students may not register for more than 12 semester hours in a term unless such registration is approved by the student's graduate advisor.
  5. A doctoral student working on a dissertation should be enrolled in an appropriate 6X99 or 7399 dissertation course. Once the student is enrolled in a dissertation course, continuous enrollment is required. A student receiving advice and assistance from a faculty member in the preparation of a dissertation must register in the course even if the student is not on campus. Doctoral students must enroll in the appropriate 6699, 6999 or 7399 Dissertation Completion course the semester in which the dissertation is defended. Students typically enroll in these courses defend and apply for graduation in the same term.  The Dissertation Completion course (7399) may only be taken once and cannot be repeated.

Dissertation Committee

After the student has passed the comprehensive examination, the doctoral supervising committee may be altered or expanded to accommodate the dissertation research needs of the student. The committee will consist of no fewer than 3 voting members. Individual programs may require the committee to have more members and students must conform to such requirements. One qualified external person who is not a member of the graduate faculty may serve as a voting member of a supervising committee if nominated by the appropriate Committee on Graduate Studies and approved by the Graduate Studies Office. Any external, non-voting members in addition to the required number of voting members of the committee must be approved by the Office of Graduate Studies. Students should consult with their program's graduate advisor to make sure their committees have sufficient membership to meet program requirements. The dissertation supervising committee is responsible for providing feedback regarding the student's dissertation, attending the defense, and determining the results of the student's defense.

Dissertation Manuscript Preparation

Students pursuing a doctoral degree must have the format of the dissertation manuscript approved by the UTA Library before the degree can be conferred. Details regarding dissertation formatting requirements can be found on the UT Arlington Library website . Format must conform to standards described in the UT Arlington Manual of Style. A Dissertation Template in which students can paste text is provided to simplify proper dissertation formatting and appearance.

Mechanical Check

The format of all dissertations must be reviewed and approved by the Library before the theses will be accepted as satisfying the dissertation requirement of the Ph.D. degree. Doctoral students must submit a copy of their dissertation electronically to the ETD Coordinator in the UT Arlington Library for a complete review of the format of the entire manuscript. This review is called the mechanical check. Students may be required to resubmit the document for additional checks depending on the nature and number of formatting errors found. The document submitted for mechanical check should be complete and as near to being in final format as possible.

Final Submission

After the dissertation has been through the required mechanical check process and has been approved by the student's committee and the Library, the final copy of the dissertation must be submitted via the University's electronic submission process. The final dissertation is University property and a student may make no private agreements with employers, funding sources, or others that restrict or infringe upon University rights. Thesis copyrights, where applicable, are held by the student author. The dissertation will be archived by the Library and be available to interested members of the public. Under some circumstances (see https://library.uta.edu/sites/default/files/TD_Embargo_Policy.pdf )  a student may request to delay publication of the dissertation for a limited period of time. Dissertation fees are explained in the Tuition and Fees section of the catalog.

Dissertation Defense

Doctoral students must be enrolled in the appropriate course in the term in which he/she defends the dissertation (see Enrollment Requirements above).

The dissertation defense will be a public oral examination open to all members (faculty, students and invited guests) of the University community. Questioning of the candidate will be directed by the student's dissertation supervising committee. All members of the student's committee must be present at the defense.

Although the defense is concerned primarily with the dissertation research and its interpretation, the examining committee may explore the student's knowledge of areas relevant to the core of the dissertation problem. The dissertation defense may result in a decision that the candidate has 1) passed unconditionally; 2) passed conditionally with remedial work specified by the committee; 3) failed, with permission to be re-examined after a specified period; or 4) failed and dismissed from the program. The dissertation must be approved unanimously by the student's dissertation supervising committee and by the Academic Dean. Regardless of the outcome of the defense, the thesis defense results must be submitted to the Office of Records and Registration.

Credit Toward Certificates

Only courses completed with a grade of A, B, C, or P can satisfy graduate certificate requirements. However, courses in which grades of D or F are earned will affect a student's grade-point average. A student must have a B (3.0) grade-point average in courses included in their degree plan and a B (3.0) average in all work undertaken as a graduate student to have credits applied toward a graduate certificate.

Grade Point Average

All grades in courses taken as a special non-degree seeking student and graduate certificate status will be considered in computing a student's graduate grade point average.

Transfer Credit Applied to Graduate Certificates

Equivalent coursework completed at other institutions of recognized standing may be transferred to a master's certificate program after evaluation and approval. Transferred courses do not appear on the UT Arlington Official Transcript and grades earned in transferred courses are not included in calculating a student's UT Arlington graduate grade point average.

The number of transfer units is limited to 50% of the total units required for the certificate, except in certificate programs that exceed 15 units, in which case 12 of those units must be taken in residence. This rule does not invalidate written agreements stated elsewhere in this catalog. Transfer credit will be accepted only for organized courses in which the student received a letter grade of B or higher and an official transcript showing the course(s) and grade(s) is required.