Undergraduate

Undergraduate Admission to a Degree Program

Admission to the University’s degree programs is determined by application to the academic unit offering the degree.

Degree Plan

Students are responsible for requesting a degree plan through their major department advisor during the semester following admission to a degree program. No deviation from a degree plan will be allowed except with the written approval of the department advisor, the chair of the major department and the academic dean.

Multiple Undergraduate Degrees at UT Arlington

While a student should carefully consider with an academic advisor if obtaining multiple undergraduate degrees is necessary for a given career path, it is possible for students to earn more than one undergraduate degree under the certain conditions and limitations.

DOUBLE MAJOR

A student who fulfills the specified requirements for two different majors under a single degree, simultaneously prior to graduation, completes a double major.  For example, a student may complete a Bachelor of Arts in History and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science – both B.A. degrees - or a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and a Bachelor of Science in Biology – both B.S. degrees. Prerequisite and field of study courses are required to complete both majors. 
When applying for graduation, a student should note on the application that he/she will be completing an additional major. One diploma is issued and both majors are recorded on a student’s transcript and diploma. Also, upon graduation, a student can attend multiple commencement ceremonies if the majors span across different colleges, though both majors are announced at any ceremony and college-specific policies apply for each ceremony.

DUAL DEGREE

A student who fulfills the specified requirements for two different majors from different degrees, simultaneously prior to graduation, will complete a dual degree.  For example, a student may complete a Bachelor of Science in Biology and a Bachelor of Arts in Public Relations – a B.S. degree and a B.A. degree.  The student must complete a minimum additional 30 credit hours beyond the degree plan with the greater required credit hours and also complete all prerequisite and field of study courses for both degrees. 
Upon graduation, the student must complete two graduation applications (one application for each degree) and pay the processing fee for each degree. Upon graduation a student can attend multiple commencement ceremonies if the majors span across different colleges, though both degrees are announced at any ceremony and college-specific policies apply for each ceremony.

SECOND BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

A student who earns a bachelor degree subsequent to receiving the first bachelor degree will complete a second baccalaureate degree.  The student must complete at least 30 credit hours in residence, above and beyond the minimum number of hours to complete the first degree.  One diploma is issued and the new degree is added to the student’s transcript.

Academic Advising and Limitations

Students seeking a double major or dual degree must:

  • seek regular advising for each degree program from the department offering the major.
  • understand the requirements to remain in and graduate from each degree program.
  • adhere to proper course sequencing and complete the proper prerequisite and field of study courses for each degree program.

All requirements to enter a major in a given department must be met in order to pursue that major/degree.  Students who are not meeting the requirements to remain in a particular degree program can be removed from that major/degree and prohibited from further enrolling in coursework to earn the additional undergraduate degree.

A student can only work on two major/degree programs simultaneously.  Some degree programs may limit or not permit the pursuit of a double major or dual degree. Students should discuss possible limitations with both departmental advisors to determine what limitations may apply. Additional major degrees cannot be added to students’ degree plans until they have completed at least 30 hours of college coursework.  It is also important to note that once a degree has been conferred and applied to a student’s transcript the degree cannot be removed from the academic record.

Graduate Course to Undergraduate Program

Graduate level course work may be transferred as upper-division credit at the written request of the student. Any graduate courses transferred in as upper-division undergraduate work will not be eligible for use at a later date in the graduate school.

Minor Field of Study

A minor requires at least 18 semester hours in a given program, including six hours of advanced work. Specific course sequences for a minor are determined by the program offering the minor. Since some undergraduate degree programs do not offer minors, students should consult an advisor in their program of study.

In a case where the student wishes to pursue a minor comprised of courses within the same college as that which offers his/her major program of study, the student and his/her advisor will propose a program of study/list courses for approval by the dean of the college.

In a case where the student wishes to pursue a minor which includes one or more courses offered by a different college from that which offers his/her major program of study, the student and his/her advisor will propose a program of study/list of courses for approval by both (a) the dean of the college which offers his/her major, and (b) the dean of the college which offers the minor courses.

In either case, the approved minor program of study will be forwarded to the Office of Admissions, Records and Registration for verification and notation on the student’s transcript.

The Core Curriculum

Given the rapid evolution of necessary knowledge and skills and the need to take into account global, national, state, and local cultures, the core curriculum must ensure that students will develop the essential knowledge and skills they need to be successful in college, in a career, in their communities, and in life. Therefore, with the assistance of the Undergraduate Education Advisory Committee and pursuant to Texas Education Code, Section 61.821, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board approved a 42 semester credit hour core curriculum for all undergraduate students in Texas, including a statement of purpose, six core objectives, and common component areas.

Statement of Purpose

Through the Texas Core Curriculum, students will gain a foundation of knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, develop principles of personal and social responsibility for living in a diverse world, and advance intellectual and practical skills that are essential for all learning.

Core Objectives

  • Critical Thinking Skills - to include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information
  • Communication Skills - to include effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication
  • Empirical and Quantitative Skills - to include the manipulation and analysis of numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions
  • Teamwork - to include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal
  • Personal Responsibility - to include the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making
  • Social Responsibility: to include intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities

The UT Arlington Core Curriculum is comprised of the following component areas:

  • Communication
  • Mathematics
  • Life and Physical Sciences
  • Language, Philosophy and Culture
  • Creative Arts
  • American History
  • Government/Political Science
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences
  • Foundation Area Option

Click here for the requirements and approved courses.

Core Complete: Students who transfer from a Texas public community college or public university and are certified as core complete shall have satisfied the core requirements of UT Arlington. Academic departments may, in some instances, require specific courses outside their major as prerequisites for major course work. (See “Credit Evaluation” and “Transfer of Lower Division Course Credit” under Undergraduate Admission section, p.15-16.)

Transcript Codes: The Transcript Codes identify specific core requirements on a student’s transcript. For further information on core transferability, consult with an academic advisor, or refer to the Texas Administrative Code.

Field of Study: Students who complete an approved field of study curriculum in whole or in part will receive academic credit for the equivalent courses within their selected field of study at UT Arlington. View the field of study curriculums approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board at www.thecb.state.tx.us.

Note: Consult a specific academic department in this catalog regarding further requirements for a degree in your area of interest.

Competence in Computer Use

Graduating students should be proficient in the use of computers. Proficiency is understood as the ability to use word-processing, database/spreadsheet and representative software of one’s major discipline. Each student should be able to tap the communications, analytical and information-retrieval potential of computers to solve research problems and be able to evaluate the results. Students should consult their departmental, school or college advisors to determine the mechanisms by which they can demonstrate proficiency. An examination or completion of a department- or college-designated course may be required.

Competence in Communication

Students should have proficiency in communication skills including interaction in classroom settings to meet the needs of course work and the use of acceptable grammar and pronunciation in formal presentations. Students should consult their individual department, school or college advisors to determine the mechanisms by which they can demonstrate this competency. A proficiency examination or completion of a department- or college-designated course may be required.

Tuition for Excessive Undergraduate Hours

Pursuant to state law, students who first enrolled in any college or university in Fall 1999 or a later semester may be required to pay a higher tuition rate if attempted undergraduate credit hours exceed a designated limit. Students who first entered a college or university in Fall semester 1999 through Summer semester 2006 may be required to pay a higher tuition rate when the credit hours attempted at publicly-funded Texas colleges or universities exceed by 45 or more the hours required for the student’s declared baccalaureate degree. Students who first entered a college or university in Fall semester 2006 and thereafter may be required to pay higher tuition rates when the credit hours attempted at publicly-funded Texas colleges or universities exceed by 30 or more the hours required for the student’s declared baccalaureate degree. This requirement applies only to the first baccalaureate degree earned; students already holding one baccalaureate degree are exempt when enrolled in a second baccalaureate degree program.

This requirement applies to all credit hours attempted at any publicly-funded Texas institution, including courses with a grade of D, F, or W, as well as courses serving as a grade replacement and courses that have been grade replaced or grade excluded or grade forgiven. Credit hours earned at a private or an out-of-state institution are not counted toward the limit. Some other exceptions may apply.

For more information about this state law, see www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us (Texas Education Code, secs. 54.014 and 61.0595), or UT Arlington's excessive hours website.

Residency Requirements

The degree requirements for graduation in specific divisions of the University are explained at the beginning of each division in the catalog. In addition:

  • The University of Texas at Arlington (UT Arlington) requires that each candidate for an undergraduate degree must complete and receive credit earned in residence at UT Arlington for a minimum of 25 percent of the semester credit hours required for a degree.   The term "in residence" is defined as in residence at the U.T. System component which ultimately grants the degree. Types of credit that do not meet UT Arlington’s credit-in-residence requirement are:
    • Transfer work of any kind
    • Credit by examination
    • Advanced placement credit
    • International Baccalaureate credit
    • High school dual enrollment credit
    • Military training
    • Foreign study credit that appears on the student’s transcript as transfer credit
  • Each candidate for an undergraduate degree must complete and receive credit in residence for at least 18 semester hours of advanced (3000/4000 level) course work, to include 12 hours of advanced courses in the major subject
  • Successful completion of a course of study prescribed by the major department, including a minimum of 36 advanced hours, is required for an undergraduate degree at UT Arlington. Courses numbered with a first digit of 3 or 4 are classified as advanced courses.
  • A minimum overall grade point average of 2.0 (C average) is required for an undergraduate degree. In addition, a minimum grade point average of 2.0 in the major is required. Individual units will determine the specific courses to be included in the calculation of the GPA in the major, and may have higher overall GPA requirements for graduation than a 2.0. (The College of Business requires a 2.0 overall grade-point average, 2.0 on all course work taken in the college, and 2.0 within the major and concentration area for those majors having a concentration.)
  • Transfer credit is generally awarded for academic course credit earned from regionally accredited institutions or from institutions that are candidates for regional accreditation if the course credit was earned during the candidacy period.  At the undergraduate level, no more than 30 of the semester hours required for any degree may be completed by correspondence and/or extension, but may include online course work or other coursework approved by the Dean of the academic department.  This includes coursework from non-regionally-accredited institutions and Workforce Education courses.  Workforce courses that are agreed upon in articulation agreements between accredited institutions of higher education and UT Arlington are transferable.  In addition, where workforce courses support a degree program,  the Dean of the college may approve those courses. Courses earned as part of an Associate of Applied Science program from a regionally accredited school are accepted, with some limitations, for the Bachelor of Science in University Studies degrees.
  • Only the first four semester hours of exercise and sport activity (EXSA) and dance activity (DNCA) courses may be counted toward graduation. Additional activity courses taken will not be calculated in the student’s grade point average. Each college, school or department will determine if activity courses satisfy degree requirements. Consult department academic advisor.
  • Graduate courses (numbered 5000 and above) cannot be used to fulfill undergraduate degree requirements except in programs approved by the Undergraduate Assembly.
  • To qualify for a second bachelor’s degree, a student must complete all the degree requirements as stated in the catalog for that degree and must complete no fewer than 30 semester hours beyond those of the bachelor’s degree program requiring the greater number of hours. The additional hours must be taken in residence at UT Arlington.

The Office of Admissions, Records, and Registration conducts automated degree audits for each undergraduate candidate for graduation to ensure that no less than 25 percent of degree requirements were completed in residence at UT Arlington.

UT Arlington’s credit-earned-in-residence regulations allow colleges and departments to impose additional residence requirements, but no college or department can override the minimum residency requirement [1].

To qualify for a second bachelor’s degree, a student must complete all the degree requirements as stated in the catalog for that degree and must complete no fewer than 30 semester hours beyond those of the bachelor’s degree program requiring the greater number of hours. The additional hours must be taken in residence at UT Arlington.

Transfer credit is generally awarded for academic course credit earned from regionally accredited institutions or from institutions that are candidates for regional accreditation if the course credit was earned during the candidacy period.  At the undergraduate level, no more than 30 of the semester hours required for any degree may be completed by correspondence and/or extension, but may include online course work or other coursework approved by the Dean of the academic department.  This includes coursework from non-regionally-accredited institutions and Workforce Education courses. 

Two-Year Transfer Programs

The course offerings of the University are sufficient in the following fields for a student to complete the first two years of study toward a baccalaureate degree. The student must transfer to another institution to complete their studies. Information about the programs may be obtained from the Allied Health Coordinator in Life Sciences.

TWO-YEAR TRANSFER PROGRAMS

  • Gerontology
  • Dietetics
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Pharmacy
  • Dental Hygiene
  • Rehabilitation Science
  • Prosthetics and Orthotics

Professions

Health professions

MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY

In general, medical and dental school admission committees do not state a preference about an undergraduate major field, leaving the student free to choose a degree program suited to individual abilities and interests. Therefore, the student may choose any major, after conferring with an advisor, if the minimum requirements stated by the professional schools are met.

Admission Requirements for The University of Texas Medical and Dental Schools

English

6 semester hours of college English.

Biology

14 semester hours (12 semester hours of lecture & 2 semester hours of formal lab) of Biological Sciences.

Mathematics

Statistics (MATH 1308) is required. Some school may accept Calculus in place of Statistics, however you will need to confirm with the Health Professions Advisor.

Physics

8 semester hours, as required for college science majors, including the corresponding laboratory experience are required.

Chemistry

8 semester hours of General Chemistry AND 8 semester hours of Organic Chemistry.

Testing

The Medical College Admission Test (New MCAT) or Dental Aptitude Test (DAT) as required.

It is strongly recommended that students taking the 2015 MCAT complete Biochemistry I, Into to Psychology, and Intro to Sociology. These courses will be covered on the new MCAT.

These requirements are representative of admission requirements for most other American medical and dental schools.

Health Professions Counseling and Advising

The Health Professions Counseling and Advising Center, located in Room 206, Life Science Building, provides counseling for students interested in medicine, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy and veterinary medicine. All pre-professional students should contact the office upon entering the University. The services provided include new student orientation, academic advising, career counseling and assistance in applying to professional school. In addition, numerous career materials including catalogs, applications and testing information are available in Room 206, Life Science Building. The health professions advisor coordinates the Health Professions Advisory Committee's evaluation recommended for each pre-medical and pre-dental student before applying to professional school. Students applying to professional schools should contact the health professions advisor at least one year prior to applying.

The Health Professions Advisory Committee, which is responsible for recommending students for medical and dental schools, bases evaluations on three factors: a student's academic record, resume,  and personal qualities. The ideal applicant will demonstrate strength in all three areas. The committee may decline to recommend students who have not completed at least a portion of his/her pre-medical or pre-dental sciences at The University of Texas at Arlington, or may be unable to recommend students because their personal qualities are not known. Therefore, it is important that a student actively participate in health profession programs involving medical schools and the pre-health related student organizations. Also, students should interact with the faculty and pre-medical advisor for at least one year prior to medical school application so the advisors will have an opportunity to become familiar with the students' individual background.

THE LEGAL PROFESSION

Students are free to choose the degree program that best suits their interests and abilities; law schools do not require any particular major, degree plan, or courses. Students at UTA who are considering law school may take one of two routes, either: (1) selecting any major and minor, or (2) pursuing a major or minor that is specified as pre-law.   Students wishing to focus on law-related courses at the undergraduate level should consider the pre-law degree plans in political science, criminal justice, philosophy, and history. Students who do not follow a pre-law degree track should choose any major and consult the advisor in the major department and/or in the University Advising Center.  They also should confer with an advisor in the UTA Pre-Law Center with regard to recommended additional courses, depending on their degree plans. Law schools look favorably on students with diverse academic interests. UTA graduates not only in the liberal arts and business but also in math, biology, and engineering, for example, have been successful in law school and beyond.

45 Hours to Major Requirement

45 Hours to Undergraduate Major Policy.

1. Each student enrolled in an a bachelor's degree program at UT Arlington shall file a degree plan no later than the end of the second regular semester immediately following the semester in which the student earned a cumulative total of 45 or more semester credit hours for coursework successfully completed by the student, including transfer courses, international baccalaureate courses, dual credit courses, and any other course for which the institution the student attends has awarded the student college course credit, including course credit awarded by examination.

2. A student transferring to UT Arlington who begins the student's first semester with 45 or more semester credit hours of course credit for courses shall file a degree plan no later than the end of the student's second regular semester (fall or spring term).  A student whose first term is summer will have through the end of his/her fall term to file the degree plan.  Students who are unable to be admitted to a major of their choosing must see an academic advisor in the University Advising Center for special permission to enroll.

3. At each registration for a semester, a student who is required to have filed a degree plan before that semester shall verify that:

(1)  the student has filed a degree plan; and
(2)  the courses for which the student is registering are consistent with that degree plan.

4.  If a student does not timely file a degree plan as required, will be notified that the degree plan is required by law under House Bill 3025 and require the student to consult with an academic advisor for that purpose during the semester in which the student receives the notice.  The student may not obtain an official transcript from the UT Arlington until the student has filed a degree plan.

Reverse Articulation Requirement

Legislation passes as part of House Bill 3025 also establishes a reverse articulation program for the awarding of an Associate degree. Students who transferred from, or previously attended, a lower-division institution of higher education, earned at least 30 semester credit hours for coursework at the lower-division institution, and have completed 90 semester credit hours while enrolled at a general academic institution, will be contacted by their general academic institution to provide permission to send the lower-division institution the student’s transcript. The lower-division institution will evaluate the transcript to see if the student is eligible to receive an Associate’s degree.

For additional information regarding the UT Arlington’s administration of the Texas timely completion policy, please visit http://wweb.uta.edu/aao/recordsandregistration/content/student_services/timely_completion.aspx.