College of Nursing and Health Innovation

http://www.uta.edu/conhi/

Mission and Philosophy

The College of Nursing and Health Innovation is an integral component of The University of Texas at Arlington and subscribes to the mission of the University. The College of Nursing and Health Innovation prepares quality health care providers through excellence in education, scholarship, and service. The academic programs in Nursing, Kinesiology, and related studies prepare individuals for professional roles in health care, health sciences, and health-related professions.  In addition, these programs prepare individuals for collaboration with other professionals and consumers in the delivery of holistic health care, health-related research, exercise science and advocacy for the improvement of health outcomes.

The faculty believes that learning is a continuous lifelong process and a personal responsibility. Students must be actively involved in the learning process to acquire clinical, technical, and academic proficiency and to be socialized into professional roles. Learning experiences are implemented to achieve sequence, continuity and synthesis of knowledge and expertise as defined by the educational outcomes. Teaching and learning are dynamic processes involving curriculum evaluation and revision based on research evidence, the needs of a multicultural society, and the changing health care system. The educational process facilitates the development of each person's potential and promotes cultural competence and assimilation of ethical principles.

The College of Nursing and Health Innovation believes in collaboration and partnerships with stakeholders that include education, community and health care organizations, other research institutions, as well as individuals who are impacted by each of the undergraduate, graduate, and certificate programs. Feedback from the community is used to strengthen the programs and ensure that the graduates are regarded as employees of choice. Innovation and positive change are outcomes of strong collaboration between the college and its alumni and other constituents.

Faculty and students foster an educational climate of mutual respect, honesty, intellectual inquiry, creativity, and effective communication. We contribute to the development of our professions through the conduct of research and the dissemination and application of evidence-based knowledge. Faculty and students provide service to the community through clinical practice, education,  and leadership.  

Undergraduate nursing education builds on a foundation of studies in the sciences, humanities, and arts. The baccalaureate program prepares competent, self-directed generalist nurses (Registered Nurses) who can assume increasing responsibility and leadership in the delivery of evidence-based nursing care.

Master’s Nursing education builds on a foundation of undergraduate nursing education and provides specialty practice with an expanded theoretical and empirical knowledge base. The Master of Science in nursing programs prepare Registered Nurses for advanced functional roles that require increased accountability, expertise, and leadership. Graduates are prepared to provide evidence-based health care in collaboration with other health care providers and consumers. Administration graduates are prepared to lead and manage care in a variety of health care settings. Education graduates are prepared to teach in schools of nursing and health care organizations.

Doctoral education develops and advances empirical knowledge to promote evidence-based practice in the discipline of nursing. Research-focused graduates have a background to develop theories and conduct research with vulnerable populations and to assume academic, research, and leadership roles. The research doctorate provides a basis for future research programs and other scholarly activities. Practice-focused graduates have a background to develop and lead patient-centered delivery systems, conduct clinical research projects, and assume professional leadership roles. The practice doctorate provides a basis to translate research findings into practice for future population focused quality improvement and other evidence-based activities. 

The Department of Kinesiology is committed to providing quality educational programs that emphasize scientific theory, hands-on learning in the laboratory setting and real-world application through clinical internships and other field-based experiences. The faculty's teaching experience and research expertise provide rich learning experiences across all of the department's academic programs.

History and Overview

The UT Arlington College of Nursing was established in 1971 as the U.T. System College of Nursing in Fort Worth and was housed in John Peter Smith Hospital. The first baccalaureate class enrolled in fall of 1972; the graduate program (MSN) began in 1975. In 1976, the school became an academic unit of UT Arlington, moving to the campus in 1977.  Degree program offerings continued to expand to include a PhD in Nursing in fall 2003.  In fall of 2014, the Department of Kinesiology was combined with the College of Nursing to create the College of Nursing and Health Innovation.

The Undergraduate Nursing Program consists of the BSN and the RN to BSN programs. In addition to the Arlington campus, these programs are offered online through the UT Arlington Academic Partnership program. The Graduate Program offers a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) with preparation as a nurse practitioner in the areas of Acute Care Adult Gerontology, Acute Care Pediatric, Adult Gerontology Primary Care (previously Adult and Gerontology), Family, Neonatal, Primary Care Pediatric and Family Psychiatric-Mental Health. Post-master’s certificates are available in all the above nurse practitioner specialties. In addition, the UT Arlington MSN Program offers preparation in Nursing Administration and Nursing Education in an accelerated online format. Certificates are offered in: Advanced Nurse Educator. An RN to MSN in Nursing Administration and RN to MSN in Nursing Education programs were approved in 2014.  PhD in Nursing was approved in April 2003 with classes beginning in Fall 2003. A BSN-to-PhD entry option was approved in 2005, with classes beginning in Fall 2006. A Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) began in Fall 2009.

The undergraduate studies within the Department of Kinesiology are organized into four program areas: athletic training, exercise science, physical education teacher education and sport leadership and management.  Each of these academic programs share a common core of kinesiology courses that provide students with a strong foundation in the sciences of human anatomy, biomechanics and exercise physiology, as well as an introduction to research methodology. In addition to the kinesiology core, each undergraduate degree plan provides a comprehensive discipline-specific program of study designed to prepare students for a specific career path.

The Kinesiology graduate programs include a Master of Science in Exercise Science and a Master of Science in Athletic Training.  Some of the degree plan options work towards meeting the prerequisite requirements for admission to physical therapy, occupational therapy and physician's assistant graduate programs, as well as medical and dental schools (e.g., BS in Exercise Science - Clinical Health Professions).  Other degree plans prepare students for state and national certification/licensure (e.g., Physical Education Teacher Education and Athletic Training) programs.

Accreditation

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Master of Science in Nursing and Doctor of Nursing Practice Programs are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) and governed by the Texas Board of Nursing. The CCNE address is One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036-1120; Phone is (202) 887-6791 and fax is (202) 887-8476; and Website: www.aacn.nche.edu/accreditation. There are no accrediting agencies for PhD in Nursing programs.

The Kinesiology Athletic Training Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).  CAATE ensures that accredited institutions and education programs that offer athletic training meet the rigorous standards for professional athletic training education and encourages continuous enhancement in the quality of preparing athletic trainers.

Scholastic Activities and Research Interests of the Faculty

The research programs of the College of Nursing faculty are diverse. A sampling of their areas of study includes oncology, neonatology, chemical dependency, sickle cell disease, Hispanic health care, maternal birth outcomes, leadership in nursing education, chemical dependency and abuse, technology in the care of older adults, and simulation and technology in health professional education.

Research programs of the Department of Kinesiology are also diverse.  Faculty research interests and publications in the Department of Kinesiology include adapted sports, sports pedagogy, applied biomechanics, motor development, cardiovascular physiology, autonomic function, environmental physiology, cardiac function, pulmonary responses to exercise, postural control in the elderly, dynamic regulation of blood pressure, assessment and management of sports-related concussions, the effects of therapeutic modalities on the treatment of athletic injuries, and the effects of hyperbaric oxygen on the treatment of diseases.

Special Programs and Opportunities

Smart HospitalTM

Associate Dean for Simulation and Technology: Dr. Judy LeFlore

The Smart HospitalTM is a simulated hospital environment complete with state-of-the-science equipment and furnishings. In this facility, students interact with and provide care to a full array of simulated patients who occupy the Emergency Department, ICU, Labor and Delivery suite, pediatric unit, Neonatal ICU, adult medical/surgical beds and the resuscitation room for large team training. Students learn utilizing simulation technology including full body interactive patient simulators, computerized scenario-based programs and individual trainers for specific skills.

The "patients" who populate our Smart Hospital are life-sized computerized manikins that actually interact with the learners. Patients include infants, children, adults, and even a mother in labor who goes through the labor process and delivers a newborn. Some manikins are static but others are interactive and responsive-they can speak and breathe, have heart sounds and lung sounds, and can progress through the various stages of numerous clinical states from birth through death. In addition, we have specially trained actors who can serve as patients or family members in clinical teaching scenes. In each clinical scenario, the students are exposed to situations and changes in patient conditions, both subtle and obvious, that they will experience in actual practice. With repeated exposure to these situations, students develop a deeper understanding of clinical conditions and become more adept at critical and clinical thinking. With this foundation, our students move more quickly from novice to expert and in so doing enhance the quality of patient care they provide.

Center for Research and Scholarship

Associate Dean: Dr. Paul J. Fadel

Scholarship is an essential component of the professional role in the College of Nursing. The Center provides support services to faculty and students: identifying funding sources; developing competitive proposals; writing grant applications; retrieving literature; collecting, entering and analyzing data; and disseminating research results and other scholarly products. Collaborative relationships for research with Metroplex health care agencies are in place.

Center for Hispanic Studies in Nursing and Health

The Center is dedicated to fostering an understanding between health care professionals and people of Hispanic origin for the purpose of increasing understanding of health and healing through research of individual experience, cultural meanings, and the structure of institutions as important variables influencing health outcomes. The Center is also committed to the provision of educational programs and services which will assist health care providers to gain the necessary knowledge and skills to deliver increasingly culturally sensitive and competent care. The Center promotes interdisciplinary and interuniversity collaboration as a strategy for development of resources to solve or deal with bi-cultural issues facing health care professionals.

Rural Health Outreach Program

The purpose of the Center is to provide appropriate, affordable, accessible continuing education to the nursing staffs of acute care and psychiatric hospitals, long term care facilities, home health agencies, and other health care facilities in the rural communities of North Central Texas.

Center for Healthy Living and Longevity

Associate Dean: Dr. David Keller

The Department of Kinesiology's Center for Healthy Living and Longevity provides a multidisciplinary approach to improving health and functioning throughout the lifespan. Research and education initiatives focus on keeping senior citizens active, decreasing the incidence of sedentary-related diseases (diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, obesity, etc.), and the assessment and management of concussions. Contact: Dr. Christopher Ray, kellerd@uta.edu.

Programs

Bachelor Degree

Master’s Degrees

Doctoral Degrees

Certificates

Courses

KINE 1230. FIRST AID / CPR / AED TRAINING. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to cover the components of Standard First Aid, Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) for the Professional Rescuer, and Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training. Certification is possible upon successful course completion. Offered as HEED 1230 and KINE 1230. Students seeking credit in HEED should enroll in HEED 1230 and students seeking credit in KINE should enroll in KINE 1230. Credit will not be granted for both courses.

KINE 1315. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to, and observation of, practices in pedagogical kinesiology and sports leadership.

KINE 1400. INTRODUCTION TO EXERCISE SCIENCE. 4 Hours.

Introduction to key concepts concerning the anatomical, biomechanical, and physiological basis of exercise science. Through lecture and laboratory experiences, the student is introduced to cardiovascular responses to training, analysis of human movement, and basic principles of exercise prescription. Credit cannot be given for both KINE 1400 and the combination of courses it replaces: KINE 1124 and KINE 1314.

KINE 2130. ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL PRACTICUM I. 1 Hour.

Laboratory and clinical experiences designed to provide students with formal instruction and evaluation in the Entry Level Athletic Training Clinical Proficiencies with an instructional emphasis on preventive and protective taping and wrapping procedures. This course requires the completion of 120 clinical hours under the supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) or Clinical Instructor (CI).

KINE 2230. INTRODUCTION TO MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURIES. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to the mechanisms of musculoskeletal injury and their associated signs, symptoms, and tissue responses. Students will also be introduced to the basic principles of musculoskeletal assessment. This course is a prerequisite for admission to the Athletic Training Education Program. Prerequisite: KINE 2120, KINE 2320; must be concurrently enrolled in KINE 2130.

KINE 2301. TEACHING GAMES FOR UNDERSTANDING. 3 Hours.

The course will provide students with theoretical concepts with which they can design and analyze various short- and long-term plans related to the Teaching Games for Understanding theoretical model. Students will learn various tactical strategies and modification principles for applying learned concepts in instructional settings. The instructor will use expertise from given sports to help students transfer the common themes across the spectrum of the model's category of games. KINE 1315 is a co-requisite for this course. Prerequisite: Co-requisite KINE 1315.

KINE 2302. DANCE AND MOVEMENT ACTIVITIES. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to enhance the students performance knowledge of skills and strategies in dance and movement activities to acquaint them with effective teaching behaviors appropriate for these activities. Co-requisite KINE 1315. Prerequisite: Co-requisite KINE 1315.

KINE 2307. SPORTS AND SOCIETY. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the bidirectional impact of sport and societal institutions. The class will explore the co-dependent nature of sport and society and attempt to separate fact from fiction to aid in the understanding of the true role of sport as it fits into society. Topics to be addressed include the potentially controversial areas of race, gender, disability, institutional rule violations, and ethics in the contemporary sports arena. This is a lower level elective. Credit cannot be received for this course and KINE 3307.

KINE 2330. CARE AND PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the profession of Athletic Training. Common sports-related injuries and illnesses will be discussed with an emphasis on the proper methods for prevention, recognition, and immediate care. Offered as HEED 2330 and KINE 2330. Kinesiology majors must take KINE 2330.

KINE 2350. PUBLIC HEALTH: PRINCIPLES AND POPULATIONS. 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with an overview of Public Health: what it is, how it works, and why it is important. Topics include current health issues, global health, health disparities and how Public Health impacts community settings. Class requirement includes participation in community-based, experiential-learning activities. Examination of public health concepts, values and functions. Exploration of the underlying science of human health and disease as that is impacted by socioeconomic, behavioral, biological, environmental and other factors that impact human health and contribute to health disparities.

KINE 2420. INTRODUCTION TO ATHLETIC TRAINING. 4 Hours.

Classroom and laboratory experiences that provide an introduction to the profession of Athletic Training with an emphasis on prevention and immediate care of sports related injuries. Specific topics will include injury prevention techniques; emergency first aid and acute care; superficial application of therapeutic modalities; proper use and fitting of protective equipment; and environmental considerations. Credit cannot be given for KINE 2420 and the combination of courses it replaces: KINE 2320 and KINE 2120.

KINE 3130. ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL PRACTICUM II. 1 Hour.

Laboratory and clinical experiences designed to provide students with formal instruction and evaluation in the Entry Level Athletic Training Competencies and Clinical Proficiencies. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical experience performed under the supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) or Clinical Instructor (CI). Prerequisites: BIOL 2457, Athletic Training Majors only or permission of instructor. Corequisite: KINE 3320.

KINE 3131. ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL PRACTICUM III. 1 Hour.

Laboratory and clinical experiences that provide students with formal instruction and evaluation in the Entry Level Athletic Training Competencies and Clinical Proficiencies. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical education experience performed under the supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) or Clinical Instructor (CI). Prerequisite: BIOL 2457, Athletic Training Majors only or permission of instructor. Corequisite: KINE 3324.

KINE 3300. FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY. 3 Hours.

A study of the musculoskeletal anatomy to include bony landmarks, muscle origin, insertion and action, as well as nerve innervation. Knowledge of the functional anatomy is crucial to the understanding of sports performance, the design of strength training programs, and injury prevention. Prerequisite: BIOL 2457 and KINE 1400.

KINE 3301. BIOMECHANICS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT. 3 Hours.

Quantitative and qualitative analyses of human movement. Emphasis is on the application of the principles of human movement, with consideration of functional anatomy, kinesiology and mechanical concepts to exercise, sport, and activities of daily living. Prerequisite: KINE 1400, BIOL 2457 and MATH 1302, or permission of instructor.

KINE 3302. SPORT AND EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Analysis of exercise and sport activities in terms of psychological skills and strategies. Topics include motivation, arousal regulation, focus, concentration, group cohesion & imagery.

KINE 3303. ORGANIZATIONAL PRINCIPLES OF EXERCISE AND SPORT ACTIVITIES. 3 Hours.

An organizational analysis of exercise and sport in terms of participation rules, regulations, and responsibilities. Emphasis on knowledge and understanding of the principles governing the organization and conduct of exercise and sport activities.

KINE 3304. ADAPTED PHYSICAL EXERCISE & SPORT. 3 Hours.

Analysis of conditions that impact individuals with special needs. Emphasis on adapted physical education strategies that facilitate the learning of this population. Prior to registration, the student must complete and submit an AISD criminal background check form to the Department of Kinesiology. The form is available in the Department of Kinesiology or can be downloaded from the departmental web site. KINE 3388 is a co-requisite for this course. Prerequisite: KINE 1315 and KINE 1400. Co-requisite KINE 3388.

KINE 3306. MOTOR INTEGRATION. 3 Hours.

Principles of motor skill acquisition, performance, and control. Topics include practice strategies, memory, neuromotor functioning, attention, and learning (assessment, transfer & stages). Prerequisite: KINE 1315, and KINE 1400, or permission of instructor.

KINE 3307. SPORT AND SOCIETY: ISSUES AND DEBATES. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the bidirectional impact of sport and societal institutions. The class will explore the co-dependent nature of sport and society and attempt to separate fact from fiction to aid in the understanding of the true role of sport as it fits into society. Topics to be addressed include the potentially controversial areas of race, gender, disability, institutional rule violations, and ethics in the contemporary sports arena. This is an upper level elective. Credit cannot be received for this course and KINE 2307.

KINE 3309. FOUNDATIONS OF RECREATION. 3 Hours.

Leisure time in our social structure and the agencies which have developed to provide leisure time activities. Program development and leadership skills in the recreation profession.

KINE 3311. RECREATION AND LEISURE SERVICE. 3 Hours.

Application of management and organizational principles, objectives, and procedures involved in implementing recreational and leisure service programs.

KINE 3312. COACHING INVASION GAME PRINCIPLES. 3 Hours.

The course will provide students with theoretical concepts with which they can design and analyze various short and long-term plans related to invasion games. Students will learn various tactical strategies and modification principles for applying learned concepts in instructional settings. The instructor will use expertise from given sports to help students transfer the common themes across the spectrum of invasion games.

KINE 3313. COACHING OF NET/WALL GAME PRINCIPLES. 3 Hours.

The course will provide students with theoretical concepts with which they can design and analyze various short and long-term plans related to net/wall games. Students will learn various tactical strategies and modification principles for applying learned concepts in instructional settings. The instructor will use expertise from given sports to help students transfer the common themes across the spectrum of net/wall games.

KINE 3315. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

Provides the physiology background necessary for an understanding of the acute and chronic effects of exercise on the body. Physiological concepts and their relationship to exercise, sport, and health programs are examined. Laboratory experiences are designed for evaluating physiological responses to exercise. Prerequisite: KINE 1400, BIOL 2457, BIOL 2458, MATH 1302.

KINE 3320. LOWER EXTREMITY EVALUATION. 3 Hours.

A study of the common orthopedic and musculoskeletal injuries involving the lower extremities and lumbar spine, with a special emphasis on recognition, evaluation, diagnosis, and initial management. Prerequisite: BIOL 2457, Athletic Training Majors only or permission of instructor. Corequisite: KINE 3130.

KINE 3324. UPPER EXTREMITY EVALUATION. 3 Hours.

A study of the common orthopedic and musculoskeletal injuries involving the upper extremities, spine, head, face, abdomen, and thorax, with a special emphasis on recognition, evaluation, diagnosis, and initial management. Prerequisite: BIOL 2457, Athletic Training Majors only or permission of instructor. Corequisite: KINE 3131.

KINE 3325. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH METHODS. 3 Hours.

Current practices in the conduct of quantitative research, measurement, and evaluation processes applied to programs related to exercise science, pedagogical kinesiology, athletic training and related fields will be examined. Enrolled students will develop and conduct a research project based on their declared discipline. Prerequisite: KINE 1400, MATH 1302, MATH 1308.

KINE 3330. PATHOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Study of acute and chronic illness and their response to, and impact on, physical activity. Discussion of pharmacological agents used in the care of general illnesses and musculoskeletal disorders in the physically active. Prerequisite: BIOL 2458, acceptance into the Athletic Training Education Program or permission of instructor.

KINE 3333. THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTION II. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of upper extremity and low back rehabilitation protocols and the use of electric therapeutic modalities like ultrasound, diathermy, laser, and electric stimulation. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the disablement model and learning how to plan, implement, document, and evaluate programs for the rehabilitation and reconditioning of injuries and illnesses of athletes and others involved with physical activity. Operation of electrical therapeutic modalities and how they can be incorporated into a rehabilitation program will be investigated. The underlying principles and application techniques for each modality, therapeutic exercise progressions, patient clinical goals, legal and safe practice guidelines, and evidence based therapeutic modality science will allow for critical thinking and problem solving in relation to common upper extremity and low back injuries. Both surgical and non-surgical rehabilitation models for the upper extremity and low back will be discussed with a special emphasis on the use of functional progressions. Prerequisites: BIOL 2457 and BIOL 2458. Concurrent enrollment in KINE 4131 is required for all Athletic Training Education Program students.

KINE 3342. SOCIOLOGY OF THE HUMAN BODY. 3 Hours.

Drawing from the social sciences, cultural and gender studies, and exercise physiology, this course in body sociology addresses several comtemporary issues relating to diet, nutrition and exercise. Specific topics include eating disorders, factory farming, and "body industries" involving weight-loss diets, gyms, fashion, and cosmetic and bariatric surgery. The medical model of bodies is also examined. Also listed as SOCI 3342; credit will not be granted for both KINE 3342 and SOCI 3342.

KINE 3350. URBANIZATION AND VULNERABLE POPULATIONS. 3 Hours.

Investigation of diversity of individuals and populations in a community, including how diversity may influence policies, programs, services, and the health of a community, and the importance for a diverse public health workforce.

KINE 3351. PUBLIC HEALTH INFORMATICS. 3 Hours.

Explain and apply ethical principles that apply to the use of information technology as those pertain to accessing, collecting, analyzing, using, maintaining, and disseminating data and information.

KINE 3352. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH EPIDEMIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Analysis of factors that affect the health of a community, including how disease spreads, legal aspects of epidemics, and how data is used to drive public health decision making. Overview of how public health practice and science come together to protect the health of the public, or of a specific population. Prerequisite: MATH 1301 or MATH 1302 required. MATH 1308 recommended.

KINE 3353. HEALTH AND THE HUMAN CONDITION IN THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY. 3 Hours.

Study of the history, philosophy and contemporary issues of public health as those apply to public health in both urban and global societies.

KINE 3354. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS & MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Inquiry into the structures, functions, and authorizations of governmental public health programs. Identification of tools, processes, and activities related to both practice and policy used to support community responses to public health emergencies and other disasters. Prerequisite: KINE 1400, Co-requisite KINE 2350.

KINE 3388. THEORY AND APPLICATION IN MOTOR DEVELOPMENT. 3 Hours.

A study of motor skill development from infancy to adolescence with emphasis upon motor development theory and aspects that effect motor competence, underlie movement control, and influence change in the acquisition of motor skills. Prior to registration, the student must complete and submit an AISD criminal background check to the Department of Kinesiology. The form is available in the Department of Kinesiology or can be downloaded from the departmental Web site. Prerequisite: KINE 1315 and KINE 1400.

KINE 4130. ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL PRACTICUM IV. 1 Hour.

Laboratory and clinical experiences designed to provide students with formal instruction and evaluation in the Entry Level Athletic Training Competencies and Clinical Proficiencies. The instructional emphasis is the development of functional rehabilitation programs for musculoskeletal injuries and common orthopedic surgeries. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical experience performed under the supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) or Clinical Instructor (CI). Prerequisite: BIOL 2457 and BIOL 2458; Athletic Training Majors only or permission of instructor. Corequisite: KINE 4336.

KINE 4131. ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL PRACTICUM V. 1 Hour.

Laboratory and clinical experiences designed to provide students with formal instruction and evaluation in the Entry Level Athletic Training Competencies and Clinical Proficiencies. Instructional emphasis is on the selection and clinical application of therapeutic modalities. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical experience performed under the supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) or Clinical Instructor (CI). Prerequisite: BIOL 2457 and BIOL 2458; Athletic Training Majors only or permission of instructor. Corequisite: KINE 3333.

KINE 4132. ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL PRACTICUM VI. 1 Hour.

Laboratory and clinical experiences designed to provide students with formal instruction and evaluation in the Entry Level Athletic Training Competencies and Clinical Proficiencies. This course requires the completion of 200 hours of clinical experience performed under the supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor. Prerequisite: KINE 3130, KINE 3131, KINE 3320, KINE 3324, KINE 3330, KINE 3333, KINE 4130, KINE 4131, KINE 4336, and acceptance into the Athletic Training Education Program or approval of instructor. Must be concurrently enrolled in KINE 4233.

KINE 4188. CLINICAL HEALTH PROFESSIONS INTERNSHIP. 1 Hour.

Individualized academic training in an external clinical health professions setting (e.g. hospital, physical therapy clinic, or physician's office) under the direct supervision of a health care professional (MD, PT, OT, PA) Prerequisites: KINE 4315, current CPR certification, proof of sufficient professional liability insurance, and permission of department.

KINE 4191. CONFERENCE COURSE. 1 Hour.

Topics assigned on an individual basis covering personal research or study in the designated area. Prerequisite: permission of department chairperson.

KINE 4193. PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER CERTIFICATION PRACTICUM. 1 Hour.

In this course students will be prepared for the TExES PE-EC-12 and PPR- EC-12 exams and prepared for the professional dispositions associated with being a Physical Educator with an emphasis on ethics, interviewing, and role modeling. The students will take and review the PE Content and Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities practice teaching licensure exams. Through this process teacher candidates will be cleared for official TExES registration. This course is to be taken the semester immediately prior to the student teaching semester.

KINE 4201. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES AND TACTICS OF BASEBALL. 2 Hours.

Development and analysis of skills, offensive and defensive strategies used in the sport of baseball.

KINE 4202. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES AND TACTICS OF BASKETBALL. 2 Hours.

Development and analysis of skills, offensive/defensive strategies used in the sport of basketball.

KINE 4203. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES AND TACTICS OF FOOTBALL. 2 Hours.

Development and analysis of skills, offensive and defensive strategies used in the sport of football.

KINE 4204. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES AND TACTICS OF TRACK AND FIELD. 2 Hours.

Development and analysis of track and field event techniques and strategies.

KINE 4205. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES AND TACTICS OF VOLLEYBALL. 2 Hours.

Development and analysis of skills, offensive and defensive strategies used in the sport of volleyball.

KINE 4233. ATHLETIC TRAINING ORGANIZATION & ADMINISTRATION. 2 Hours.

A study of the administrative issues and management theories that may be encountered in athletic training. Special emphasis is placed on the practical application of concepts related to legal liability, facility design and maintenance, documentation, financial management, health insurance, and general day-to-day operations. Prerequisite: KINE 3130, KINE 3131, KINE 3320, KINE 3324, KINE 3330, KINE 3333, KINE 4130, KINE 4131, KINE 4336, and acceptance into the Athletic Training Education Program or approval of instructor.

KINE 4291. CONFERENCE COURSE. 2 Hours.

Topics assigned on an individual basis covering personal research or study in the designated area. Prerequisite: permission of department chairperson.

KINE 4293. SEMINAR IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. 2 Hours.

Synthesis of theories and concepts in athletic training. Review of the competencies and proficiencies in athletic training with special emphasis on professional development and the refinement of clinical decision-making. Prerequisite: KINE 3320, KINE 3324, KINE 3330, KINE 3333, KINE 4233, KINE 4336; Athletic Training Majors only.

KINE 4296. SPECIAL TOPICS IN EXERCISE AND SPORT. 2 Hours.

Designed to meet the current needs of students. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

KINE 4315. FITNESS ASSESSMENT/PROGRAMMING. 3 Hours.

Classroom and laboratory experiences provide the student with an opportunity to become familiar with the assessment of physical fitness including graded exercise testing, metabolic studies, basic ECG interpretation, and body composition. The student will also learn risk factor identification and exercise prescription. Prerequisite: KINE 3315, KINE 3325, and MATH 1302.

KINE 4316. FITNESS PROGRAMMING. 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with practical and theoretical applications of fitness programming. The successful student will acquire a level of proficiency in the development of fitness programs and plans based upon client specific fitness assessment characteristics. Fitness programs shall include, but not be limited to: musculoskeletal symmetry, strength, and flexibility; body composition; cardiovascular endurance, and nutritional recommendations. Additionally, successful students will become proficient in the application of client related historical, nutritional, medical, psychological, and psychosocial factors that impact the development of a properly designed exercise program. Prerequisite: Current CPR certification, MATH 1302, KINE 3300, KINE 3315, and KINE 4315, or permission of instructor.

KINE 4317. EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS. 3 Hours.

This course will discuss the pathophysiology of prevalent cardiovascular, metabolic and pulmonary diseases. Methods of exercise prescription and issues of concern will also be presented for these populations, as well as, low back pain, pregnancy, osteoporosis, cancer, anorexia and bulimia, children, adolescents, teens, older adults, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Practical application of leadership skills and hands-on instruction will be addressed in the laboratory portion of this course. Prerequisite: MATH 1302, KINE 3300, and KINE 3315.

KINE 4319. FITNESS AND OUTDOOR ADVENTURE ACTIVITIES EDUCATION. 3 Hours.

The course will provide students with theoretical health-related concepts with which they can design and apply fitness learning into various physical education settings. In addition, this course is designed to introduce students to outdoor and adventure education activities and adventure-based learning. Time will be spent on low element group initiatives and high element adventure activities. Prerequisite: KINE 2301 and KINE 2302.

KINE 4320. TEACHING SECONDARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 3 Hours.

Designed to enhance teacher candidates' understanding of curriculum development as it applies to theory of motor learning and the sciences of kinesiology. These progressions are synthesized into a collaborative service-learning project with secondary public school partner(s). Candidates take responsibility for creating, coordinating, and facilitating learning experiences that are developmentally appropriate, motivating, and based on research.

KINE 4321. TEACHING ELEM PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to synthesize the sciences of anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, motor integration and motor control with sound pedagogical knowledge into an applied elementary physical education setting. Criminal background check required. Prerequisite: KINE 3304 and KINE 3388.

KINE 4323. MOTOR CONTROL AND LEARNING. 3 Hours.

This course will expose students to the theoretical perspectives and current principles associated with the control and learning of movement skills. Specifically, the neural and mechanical mechanisms underlying motor behavior and the variables influencing motor learning will be addressed. Throughout the course, application of theoretical concepts to instructional and clinical settings will be emphasized. Prerequisite: KINE 3325.

KINE 4329. STRENGTH & CONDITIONING IN SPORT AND PERFORMANCE. 3 Hours.

This course covers the physiology and biomechanics of strength training and conditioning. Additional topics include: testing and evaluation of athletes, resistance training techniques, training program design, and organization administration of a strength training facility. This course is designed to prepare students to take the CSCS, Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, certification examination. Prerequisite: KINE 3300, KINE 3315, KINE 3325.

KINE 4330. PROGRAM DESIGN & ADMINISTRATION. 3 Hours.

The development and operation of health/wellness programs and facilities will be presented, including: program design and administration, facility design, organizational development, management theory, marketing, financial management, legal issues, strategic planning, and evaluation models. The student will participate in all phases of program and facility development, such as budget development, recruiting and retaining employees and clients, market niche, and conflict resolution. Prerequisite: KINE 3315 and KINE 3325.

KINE 4331. OBESITY & WEIGHT MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

This course is a review of the scientific literature on the causes and consequences of obesity. Topics include techniques for assessing body composition, factors promoting fat metabolism and deposition, traditional and non-traditional weight-loss programs, and adherence to weight-loss programs. Credit may not be given for both KINE 4317 AND KINE 4331. Prerequisites: KINE 3315 and KINE 3325.

KINE 4335. GRADED EXERCISE TESTING & PRESCRIPTION. 3 Hours.

The knowledge and skills necessary for assessment of health history and appraisal, blood pressure, electrocardiogram, cardiovascular fitness and function will be acquired in lecture and laboratory sessions. Various test modalities and protocols will be discussed for health and diseased populations. Prerequisite: BIOL 2457, BIOL 2458, and KINE 3315, KINE 4315, or permission of instructor.

KINE 4336. THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTION I. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the scientific theory and the basic principles of musculoskeletal rehabilitation and therapeutic modalities. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the disablement model and learning how to plan, implement, document, and evaluate programs for the rehabilitation and reconditioning of injuries and illnesses of athletes and others involved with physical activity. Operation of superficial heating and cooling therapeutic modalities and how manual treatments (e.g., traction, muscle energy and massage) can be incorporated into a rehabilitation program will be investigated. The underlying principles and application techniques for each modality, therapeutic exercise progressions, patient clinical goals, legal and safe practice guidelines, and evidence based therapeutic modality science will allow for critical thinking and problem solving in relation to common lower extremity injuries. Both surgical and non-surgical rehabilitation models for the lower extremity will be discussed with a special emphasis on the use of functional progressions. Prerequisites: BIOL 2457 and BIOL 2458. Concurrent enrollment in KINE 4130 is required for all Athletic Training Education Program students.

KINE 4337. STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING IN GENERAL POPULATIONS: HEALTH AND DISEASE. 3 Hours.

This course covers the physiology and biomechanics of strength training and conditioning as it applies to the general populations across the spectrum of health and disease. This includes: testing, evaluation, resistance training techniques and training program design for individuals with orthopedic injuries and rehabilitation concerns, metabolic conditions (e.g., diabetes), youth, elderly, and pregnant or post-prenatal women. This course is designed to prepare students to take the NSCA-CPT, and apply the skills needed to be a leader within the personal training and physical therapy career paths. Prerequisite: KINE 3300, KINE 3315, and KINE 3325.

KINE 4350. SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY. 3 Hours.

The course will provide an overview of the growing field of Sports Psychology, which involves applying psychological science to sports. Topics such as maximizing sports performance, elite performance and personality, motivation techniques in sports, leadership skills in sports, etc., will be covered.

KINE 4351. ETHICAL PRACTICES IN HEALTH PROFESSIONS. 3 Hours.

Study of ethical standards and how those are incorporated into practice and decision-making that relate to interactions with individuals, organizations, and communities. Exploration of strategies for public health, health care, and other allied healthcare organizations to work together or individually to impact the health of a community. Prerequisite: KINE 1400, KINE 2350 or instructor's permission.

KINE 4352. PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES AND METHODS. 3 Hours.

Identify scientific concepts and research methods of population health, along with the basic processes, approaches, and interventions that identify and address the major health-related needs and concerns of populations. Analysis of project implementation such as planning, assessment and evaluation. Prerequisite: Junior status, KINE 2350 or instructor permission.

KINE 4353. PUBLIC HEALTH CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE. 3 Hours.

Individualized practice-based public health work experience in a professional public health-related setting (e.g., public health agency, nonprofit organization, legislative representative office, hospital) under the direct supervision of a public health professional. To be taken during the final two semesters prior to graduation. Prerequisite: KINE 2350, KINE 3350, KINE 3351, KINE 3352, KINE 3353, KINE 3354, KINE 4355, KINE 4352.

KINE 4354. PUBLIC HEALTH ADVOCACY AND LEADERSHIP. 3 Hours.

Appraisal of leadership philosophies and actions that reflect and model effective strategies for protecting and promoting the public's health.

KINE 4355. COMMUNICATION FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS. 3 Hours.

Information and experiences that identify the health literacy of populations, including addressment of barriers and unique situations for vulnerable populations. Communication of information through appropriate, culturally competent methodologies. Integration of basic concepts of public health-specific communication into technical and professional writing. The use of mass media and electronic technology. Prerequisite: KINE 2350, KINE 3350, KINE 3351.

KINE 4387. EXERCISE SCIENCE PRACTICUM. 3 Hours.

Academic training within the internal setting of U.T. Arlington's exercise science laboratories. Each student will receive 135 hours of professional practicum experience in a variety of exercise science settings including wellness, physical fitness activity classes, physical fitness theory classes, the physical fitness center, and/or other exercise science settings. Prerequisite: Current CPR certification, KINE 4315, KINE 4316, and permission of instructor.

KINE 4388. EXERCISE SCIENCE INTERNSHIP. 3 Hours.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise science setting (e.g., hospital, physical therapy, university laboratory) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional. Prerequisite: KINE 4315, current CPR certification, and proof of sufficient professional liability insurance.

KINE 4389. FITNESS MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP. 3 Hours.

Designed on an individual basis to allow the student to apply academic training in a professional fitness center under the direct supervision of a fitness specialist. Prerequisite: Current CPR certification, KINE 4315 and proof of sufficient professional liability insurance.

KINE 4390. PRACTICUM IN SPORT PERFORMANCE. 3 Hours.

Designed on an individual basis as a field experience in the observation of sport performance, and the application of performance principles to sport participation. Students must make application for enrollment prior to October 1 for Spring Semester and prior to April 1 for Fall Semester.

KINE 4391. CONFERENCE COURSE. 3 Hours.

Topics assigned on an individual basis covering personal research or study in the designated area. Prerequisite: permission of department chairperson.

KINE 4394. HONORS THESIS/SENIOR PROJECT. 3 Hours.

Required of all students in the University Honors College. During the senior year, the student must complete a thesis or a project under the direction of a faculty member in the major department.

KINE 4395. INDIVIDUAL STUDY IN EXERCISE AND SPORT. 3 Hours.

The completion of an existing course on an individual basis as contracted with an approved faculty member. This procedure is limited to emergency situations, and must be identified through the departmental advising process.

KINE 4396. SPECIAL TOPICS IN EXERCISE AND SPORT. 3 Hours.

Designed to meet the current needs of students. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

KINE 4400. APPLIED EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY. 4 Hours.

Application of physiological principles of training of physical fitness and sport; examination of factors influencing anaerobic and aerobic training methods and their effect on fitness. Physiological responses studied include cardiovascular, neuromuscular, bioenergetics, and extreme environments. Site visits, laboratory experiences and a research project enhance the student's understanding of physiological changes and career paths in exercise science. Prerequisite: Current CPR certification, KINE 3315, KINE 3325, KINE 4315, MATH 1302 and MATH 1308.

KINE 4490. EXERCISE SCIENCE INTERNSHIP. 4 Hours.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise science setting (e.g., hospital, physical therapy, cardiac rehabilitation, fitness center) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional or licensed therapist. Corequisite: KINE 4315 and proof of sufficient professional liability insurance.

KINE 4589. EXERCISE SCIENCE INTERNSHIP. 5 Hours.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise science setting (e.g., hospital, physical therapy, cardiac rehabilitation, fitness center) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional or licensed therapist. Co-requisite: KINE 4315, and proof of sufficient professional liability insurance.

KINE 4647. ALL-LEVEL TEACHER PREPARATION STUDENT TEACHING FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 6 Hours.

This supervised course is designed as a culminating field experience of pre-service professional preparation giving an opportunity to practically apply theoretical and pedagogical knowledge in real school settings. Applied experience will be attained in both Elementary and Secondary settings. Criminal background check required. Prerequisite: KINE 1315, KINE 2301, KINE 3304, KINE 3306, KINE 3325, KINE 3388, KINE 4193, KINE 4319, KINE 4320, KINE 4321, LIST 4343, and EDML 4300.

KINE 4653. PUBLIC HEALTH EXTENDED CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE. 6 Hours.

Individualized practice-based public health work experience in a professional public health-related setting (e.g., public health agency, nonprofit organization, legislative representative office, hospital) under the direct supervision of a public health professional. To be taken during the final two semesters prior to graduation. Prerequisite: KINE 2350, KINE 3350, KINE 3351, KINE 3352, KINE 3353, KINE 3354, KINE 4355, KINE 4352.

KINE 4689. FITNESS MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP. 6 Hours.

Designed on an individual basis to allow the student to apply academic training in a professional fitness center under the direct supervision of a fitness specialist. Prerequisite: Current CPR certification, KINE 4315, KINE 4316, KINE 4387 (or concurrent enrollment), proof of sufficient professionally liability insurance, and permission of instructor.

KINE 4988. EXERCISE SCIENCE INTERNSHIP. 9 Hours.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise science setting (e.g., hospital, physical therapy, university laboratory) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional. Prerequisite: KINE 4315, KINE 4316, KINE 4387 (or concurrent enrollment), current CPR certification, proof of sufficient professional liability insurance, and permission of instructor.

KINE 4989. FITNESS MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP. 9 Hours.

Designed on an individual basis to allow the student to apply academic training in a professional fitness center under the direct supervision of a fitness specialist. Prerequisite: Current CPR certification, KINE 4315, KINE 4316, KINE 4387 (or concurrent enrollment), proof of sufficient professionally liability insurance, and permission of instructor.

KINE 5120. ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL I. 1 Hour.

Clinical experiences performed in an athletic training setting or other health care facility under the supervision of a program approved health care provider.

KINE 5125. IMMUNOLOGY. 1 Hour.

This course will include a brief review of the immune system and factors that affect immune function with emphasis on the effect of exercise and stress on muscle and overall immune function. The effect of nutrition and over-training on the immune system and associated syndromes/diseases will also be presented.

KINE 5130. Clinical Athletic Training II. 1 Hour.

Clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisites: KINE 5420, KINE 5220, KINE 5120.

KINE 5140. Clinical Athletic Training III. 1 Hour.

Clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5130.

KINE 5150. Clinical Athletic Training IV. 1 Hour.

Clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5140.

KINE 5160. Clinical Athletic Training V. 1 Hour.

Clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5150.

KINE 5170. JOURNAL CLUB IN PHYSIOLOGY. 1 Hour.

This course is designed to provide the students an opportunity to learn the art of critically reading and interpreting research articles. There will be emphasis on identifying strengths and weakness of research studies. There will also be an opportunity for the students to present their research study ideas and / or their preliminary findings of their research to the class. This will provide an opportunity for students to interact and receive / provide feedback regarding methodological approaches and interpretation of findings. Lastly, the student will learn how to prepare and deliver presentations to an audience.

KINE 5190. SPECIAL TOPICS IN KINESIOLOGY. 1 Hour.

In-depth study of selected topics in physical education and exercise science. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

KINE 5191. INTERNSHIP IN CARDIOPULMONARY REHABILITATION. 1 Hour.

The student will complete 400 internship hours in an approved Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation setting. The student may take two semesters of KINE 5191 at 200 hours each. The student will be involved in patient/client assessment, training, rehabilitation, risk factor identification and lifestyle management services provided for individuals with or at risk for cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases. In addition the student will observe common cardiac surgeries and diagnostic procedures to better understand the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular, pulmonary and metabolic disease.

KINE 5192. INTERNSHIP IN GRADED EXERCISE TESTING FOR HIGH RISK POPULATIONS. 1 Hour.

The student will complete 200 hours of graded exercise testing in an approved hospital or outpatient clinical setting which conducts exercise tests for high risk populations, including clients with suspected cardiopulmonary and metabolic diseases. The student will be exposed to noninvasive (echocardiography and graded exercise testing) and invasive methods used to diagnose cardiopulmonary and metabolic disease, including procedures conducted in cath and nuclear testing laboratories.

KINE 5193. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE INTERNSHIP. 1 Hour.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise physiology setting (e.g., physical medicine, athletic training, external laboratory, health/fitness facility, professional teams or sports management) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional.

KINE 5194. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 1 Hour.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology.

KINE 5195. INTERNSHIP IN GRADED EXERCISE TESTING FOR HIGH RISK POPULATIONS. 1 Hour.

The student will complete 200 hours of graded exercise testing in an approved hospital or outpatient clinical setting which conducts exercise tests for high risk populations, including clients with suspected cardiopulmonary and metabolic diseases. The student will be exposed to noninvasive (echocardiography and graded exercise testing) and invasive methods used to diagnose cardiopulmonary and metabolic disease, including procedures conducted in cath and nuclear testing laboratories.

KINE 5196. LABORATORY TECHNIQUES IN EXERCISE SCIENCE. 1 Hour.

A primary objective of this course is to further your understanding of exercise physiology. A second but equally important objective is to enhance your ability for critical thinking on exercise physiology through the scientific process. This includes formation of a research question, hypothesis, designing an experiment, and inferring conclusions from data. Secondary objectives include improving technology skills to assist collecting and analyzing data, and writing and oral communication skills for demonstrating understanding of the physiological principles.

KINE 5198. THESIS. 1 Hour.

KINE 5220. PREVENTATIVE AND ACUTE CARE TECHNIQUES IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. 2 Hours.

Classroom and laboratory experiences designed to provide students with formal instruction and evaluation in the prevention and acute care of activity related injuries and illnesses.

KINE 5221. CLINICAL ATHLETIC TRAINING II. 2 Hours.

Clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 275 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5420, KINE 5220, KINE 5120.

KINE 5222. CLINICAL ATHLETIC TRAINING III. 2 Hours.

Lecture and associated clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 275 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5430, KINE 5433, KINE 5221.

KINE 5223. CLINICAL ATHLETIC TRAINING IV. 2 Hours.

Lecture and associated clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of clinical hours of experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5431, KINE 5434, KINE 5222.

KINE 5224. CLINICAL ATHLETIC TRAINING V. 2 Hours.

Lecture and associated clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 275 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5432, KINE 5223.

KINE 5225. CLINICAL ATHLETIC TRAINING VI. 2 Hours.

Lecture and associated clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 275 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5333, KINE 5343, KINE 5224.

KINE 5226. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY II. 2 Hours.

Further study of acute and chronic illnesses and their response to, and impact on, physical activity. Discussion of pharmacological agents used in the care of general illnesses and musculoskeletal disorders in the physically active. Prerequisite: KINE 5348.

KINE 5227. LITERATURE AND RESEARCH FOR THE ATHLETIC TRAINER. 2 Hours.

This course is an overview of concepts and procedures necessary for designing, conducting, and critically appraising research in Athletic Training from multiple research paradigms. The course will focus on the steps involved in the administration of a research project, including literature review, design, data collection and analysis. Prerequisite: KINE 5226, KINE 5347, KINE 5223.

KINE 5228. SEMINAR IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. 2 Hours.

A capstone course designed to provide students the opportunity to synthesize and integrate the athletic training theories and concepts taught in the previous courses. Class discussions and projects will emphasize health care administration, professional development, cultural competence, transition to practice, inter-professional education and skills required of the entry-level athletic trainer. Prerequisite: KINE 5333, KINE 5227, KINE 5224.

KINE 5290. SPECIAL TOPICS IN KINESIOLOGY. 2 Hours.

In-depth study of selected topics in physical education and exercise science. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

KINE 5291. INTERNSHIP IN CARDIOPULMONARY REHABILITATION. 2 Hours.

The student will complete 400 internship hours in an approved Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation setting. The student may take two semesters of KINE 5191 at 200 hours each. The student will be involved in patient/client assessment, training, rehabilitation, risk factor identification and lifestyle management services provided for individuals with or at risk for cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases. In addition the student will observe common cardiac surgeries and diagnostic procedures to better understand the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular, pulmonary and metabolic disease.

KINE 5292. SPECIAL TOPICS IN KINESIOLOGY. 2 Hours.

KINE 5293. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE INTERNSHIP. 2 Hours.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise physiology setting (e.g., physical medicine, athletic training, external laboratory, health/fitness facility, professional teams or sports management) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional.

KINE 5294. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 2 Hours.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology.

KINE 5298. THESIS. 2 Hours.

KINE 5300. RESEARCH METHODS IN KINESIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

This course is an overview of concepts and procedures necessary for designing, conducting, and analyzing research in Kinesiology from multiple research paradigms. The course will focus on the steps involved in the administration of a research project, including literature review, design, data collection and analysis.

KINE 5305. APPLIED STATISTICAL PRINCIPLES IN KINESIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

The course covers descriptive statistics, elementary probability, one- and two-population mean and variance comparisons, ANOVA, simple linear regression, and correlations. In addition, more advanced principles in parametric and non-parametric statistics will be emphasized.

KINE 5320. ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

Lecture and laboratory sessions are designed to investigate concepts of energy metabolism, lactate production and accumulation, energy expenditure, excess post exercise oxygen consumption, cardiovascular and temperature regulation, neuromuscular control, aerobic and anaerobic adaptations and ergonomics.

KINE 5322. METABOLISM & EXERCISE BIOCHEMISTRY. 3 Hours.

This course will address the regulation of exercise metabolism as well as the distinct biochemical pathways through which energy transduction occurs. This will allow the student to appreciate not only the end result of metabolism, ultimately the production and maintenance of cellular ATP levels, but also the pathways that biological machines use to achieve ATP homeostasis. Calorimetry, respiratory exchange ratio, and substrate utilization during exercise will be assessed as part of the laboratory section of this course.

KINE 5323. MOTOR CONTROL AND LEARNING. 3 Hours.

This course advances on fundamental concepts of motor behavior and performance combining theoretical principles to a variety of realistic contexts to provide the basis of skilled behavior. Contemporary research in human motor behavior models is used to identify effective solutions to practical problems and to spark ideas for optimizing development, learning, and control of motor skills.

KINE 5326. CARDIOCIRCULATORY PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

The structure and function of the cardiovascular and circulatory system will be studied, as well as, cardiac control, the cardiac cycle, cardiac output, hemodynamics, vascular resistance, arterial-venous oxygen difference and oxygen delivery and consumption. Heat production and thermal control during exercise will also be addressed in lecture and laboratory sessions.

KINE 5327. PULMONARY PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

Examines the structure and function of the pulmonary system including mechanics of breathing, lung capacity tests, pulmonary circulation, lung diseases, gas exchang, ventilation, diffusing capacity, acid/base balance, neural and chemical regulation of breathing, and blood flow with respect to rest and exercise values in healthy and diseased populations. Prerequisite: KINE 5320.

KINE 5328. NEUROMUSCULAR PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

The structure and function of muscle, including the motor unit, control and integration, central and peripheral modifiers of neuromuscular control and biochemical characteristics of fibers will be studied. These concepts will also be applied to concepts in strength and power development.

KINE 5329. STRENGTH & CONDITIONING IN SPORT AND PERFORMANCE. 3 Hours.

The course covers the physiology and biomechanics of strength training and conditioning. Additional topics include: testing and evaluation of athletes, resistance training techniques, training program design, and organization administration of a strength training facility. This course is designed to prepare students to take the CSCS certification examination. Prerequisite: current CPR certification, KINE 3300, KINE 3301, KINE 3315, or permission of the instructor.

KINE 5330. ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

This course will address the impact of environmental stress (e.g., thermal, gravitational, microgravity, etc.) on the cardiovascular system. Related focus will be given to cardiac function, blood pressure regulation and thermoregulation. Topics will be addressed in lecture and laboratory sessions. *Doctoral students will be required to complete an additional research-related assignment.

KINE 5331. OBESITY & WEIGHT MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

This course is a review of the scientific literature on the causes and consequences of obesity. Topics include techniques for assessing body composition, factors promoting fat metabolism and deposition, traditional and non-traditional weight-loss programs, and adherence to weight-loss programs. Offered as KINE 4331 and KINE 5331. Credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite: KINE 5320 or permission of department.

KINE 5333. Health Care Administration. 3 Hours.

A study of the administrative issues and management theories that may be encountered in overseeing an athletic training/sports medicine program. Special emphasis is placed on the practical application of concepts related to legal liability, facility design and maintenance, financial and budget management, common health insurance models, insurance contract negotiation, strategic planning as a means to assess and promote organizational improvement, the impact of organizational structure on the daily operations of a healthcare facility, components of developing and implementing a basic business plan, medical record and documentation systems, federal and state infection control regulations and guidelines, risk management plan development, emergency action planning, and general day to day operations. Prerequisites: KINE 5431, KINE 5434, KINE 5432.

KINE 5334. Seminar in Athletic Training. 3 Hours.

Synthesis of theories and concepts in athletic training. Review of the competencies and proficiencies in athletic training with special emphasis on professional development and the refinement of clinical decision-making.

KINE 5335. GRADED EXERCISE TESTING AND PRESCRIPTION. 3 Hours.

The knowledge and skills necessary for assessment of health history and appraisal, blood pressure, electrocardiogram, cardiovascular fitness and function will be acquired in lecture and laboratory sessions. Various test modalities and protocols will be discussed for health and diseased populations.

KINE 5336. ECG INTERPRETATION. 3 Hours.

Principles of electrocardiography will be explored, with emphasis on interpretation of resting and stress ECGs. Interpretation of dynamic rhythm strips will prepare students to work in cardiac rehabilitation and other allied health professions.

KINE 5337. STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING IN GENERAL POPULATIONS: HEALTH AND DISEASE. 3 Hours.

This course covers the physiology and biomechanics of strength training and conditioning as it applies to the general populations across the spectrum of health and disease. This includes: testing, evaluation, resistance training techniques and training program design for individuals with orthopedic injuries and rehabilitation concerns, metabolic conditions (e.g., diabetes), youth, elderly, and pregnant or post-prenatal women. This course is designed to prepare students to take the NSCA-CPT, and apply the skills needed to be a leader within the personal training and physical therapy career paths. Prerequisite: KINE 3300, KINE 3315, and KINE 3325.

KINE 5338. EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS. 3 Hours.

This course will discuss the pathophysiology of cardiovascular, metabolic and pulmonary diseases. Methods of exercise prescription and issues of concern will also be presented for these populations, as well as, low back pain, pregnancy, osteoporosis, cancer, anorexia and bulimia, children, adolescents, teens, older adults, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Practical application of leadership skills and hands-on instruction will be addressed in the laboratory portion of this course.

KINE 5340. ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

This course will address the impact of environmental stress (e.g., thermal, gravitational, microgravity, etc.) on the cardiovascular system. Related focus will be given to cardiac function, blood pressure regulation and thermoregulation. Topics will be addressed in lecture and laboratory sessions.

KINE 5341. IMMEDIATE AND EMERGENCY CARE 1. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide knowledge of emergency medicine along with medical/legal and ethical issues. Students will also be required to complete a scholarship project concerning general emergency care and acute management of injuries and illnesses. Clinical hours will be required in an emergency medicine environment.

KINE 5342. IMMEDIATE AND EMERGENCY CARE 2. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to build off of Immediate and Emergency Care 1 and include didactic and clinical experiences surrounding best practices in general emergency care and acute management of injuries and illness. Students will also be required to complete a scholarship project concerning general emergency care and acute management of injuries and illnesses. Clinical hours will be required in an emergency medicine environment.

KINE 5343. LITERATURE AND RESEARCH FOR THE ATHLETIC TRAINER. 3 Hours.

This course is an overview of concepts and procedures necessary for designing, conducting, and critically appraising research in Athletic Training from multiple research paradigms. The course will focus on the steps involved in the administration of a research project, including literature review, design, data collection and analysis. Prerequisite: KINE 5432.

KINE 5344. SCHOLARSHIP IN ATHLETIC TRAINING PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to build off of the foundations of Literature and Research for the Athletic Trainerwith further study of data collection and analysis as well as evidence-based practice principles. Students will be expected to complete a scholarship project related to athletic training practice. Prerequisite: KINE 5343.

KINE 5345. SPORT NUTRITION. 3 Hours.

Overview of nutrients necessary for healthful living and nutritional impact on reducing risk factors of lifestyle diseases. Application of nutrient recommendations for sports and exercise activities, including fluid replacement, sports supplements, and ergogenic aids. In addition, students will construct plans for dietary intake of athletes during training and competition for both endurance and resistance training. Offered as KINE 5345 and KINE 3301. Credit will be granted only once.

KINE 5346. ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT AND CORRECTIVE EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

Classroom and laboratory experiences that provide an introduction to functional assessment and corrective exercises. Specific topics will include an analysis of common biomechanics of movement and the evidence-based application of functional assessment and assignment of corrective exercises. Prerequisite: KINE 5420, KINE 5430, KINE 5431, KINE 5433, KINE 5434.

KINE 5347. ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT AND CORRECTIVE EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

Classroom and laboratory experiences that provide an introduction to functional assessment and corrective exercises. Specific topics will include an analysis of common biomechanics of movement and the evidence-based application of functional assessment and assignment of corrective exercises. Prerequisite: KINE 5420, KINE 5430, KINE 5431, KINE 5433, KINE 5434.

KINE 5348. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY I. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the study of acute and chronic illnesses and their response to, and impact on, physical activity. Discussion of pharmacological principles used in the care of general illnesses and musculoskeletal disorders in the physically active. Prerequisite: KINE 5420, KINE 5220, KINE 5120.

KINE 5350. APPLIED BIOMECHANICS. 3 Hours.

Application of Newtonian mechanics to human movement analysis. Biomechanical models using three-dimensional video and force plate data will be used to analyze human movement.

KINE 5360. FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of human physiology. Physiological function is a complex process that involves a complex interaction among the various physiological systems. As such there will be an emphasis on the integration of cellular, cardiovascular, renal, autonomic, respiratory, and endocrine physiology.

KINE 5370. GLOBAL HEALTH. 3 Hours.

Today's public health practice requires an awareness of health threats beyond U.S. borders. "Global health" implies health concerns and solutions that are shared worldwide. In this course, students will study global health priorities among different populations, cultures, and health systems. Students will examine health challenges and disease threats faced in resource-constrained countries, and the roles of health determinants, socioeconomics and health equity in improving health outcomes. In addition, students will learn about the foundational elements of global health, including globalization and health, water, sanitation, the burden of infectious and chronic diseases, human rights and global health partnerships.

KINE 5371. PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION. 3 Hours.

Before we can effectively receive funding and implement programs that benefit our communities, we have to answer many questions. Who is the target audience? What are the program's goals? What are the intended outcomes of the program? How can we measure program effectiveness? Program evaluation is the methodology to developing scientifically sound answers to these questions. This course will teach you how evaluators work with stakeholders and project teams to tailor an intervention to a target audience, and document program activities, outcomes and impact on a community health issue. This course will allow you to have hands-on experience designing and conducting program evaluation.

KINE 5372. INTRODUCTION TO EPIDEMIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

By participating in this course students will learn the critical role that epidemiology plays in preventing and controlling disease. This course provides students with a foundation of the methods and concepts used in epidemiology. Students will learn the measures used in epidemiology and apply principles of causality, study design, disease surveillance, and outbreak investigations. In addition, students will be introduced to sources of data used in epidemiologic studies. The major course project will provide students with hands-on experience using skills sought by employers in public health agencies.

KINE 5373. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the critical environmental health problems in industrialized and developing countries, discusses their causes and solutions, and emphasizes the role of science in environmental policy decisions. Topics include climate change, water and air contaminants, injury risk and prevention in the workplace, food and water-borne disease, toxic metals, and how the body reacts to environmental pollutants.

KINE 5374. RACE, ETHNICITY AND HEALTH. 3 Hours.

Despite advances in medicine and health policies, racial and ethnic health disparities persist. Americans of color have higher mortality rates and an unequal burden of many health concerns compared to their white counterparts. Such health inequities compromise the cultural and economic fabric of our country. This course will discuss the complex relationship between socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, and health. In addition, this course will examine the economic and societal threats that health disparities pose to our communities and nation, as well as policies and approaches to addressing such disparities.

KINE 5375. POPULATION HEALTH. 3 Hours.

This course explores population health, providing students with learning experiences that facilitate an understanding of what public health is and why it is important. Course activities guide students in exploring their role in population health dynamics of their communities. The course will provide students an investigation of theoretical and evidence-based strategies designed to improve community health from population-based approaches. Students will then narrow those areas of foci to contemplate real-world, practice-based learning experiences.

KINE 5376. INTRODUCTION TO BIOSTATISTICS. 3 Hours.

The course will introduce students to analysis skills applied in the public health sciences. Students will learn how to apply descriptive statistics, t-tests, ANOVA, correlation, multiple regression, and non-parametric statistics to public health problems.

KINE 5377. INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH SYSTEMS AND POLICY. 3 Hours.

What is "population health" and why does it matter? Why are U.S. health care costs so high? How is the U.S. health system financed? What are the basic principles of health insurance? Who are the uninsured? It is critical that public health professionals be able to answer these questions and understand the basic functions that comprise the U.S. health care system. This course will help students answer these questions through an introduction to health systems and policy, including the delivery, quality and costs of health care for individuals and populations. The course will also examine the structure, processes and outcomes of health services, financing, organization, outcomes and accessibility of care.

KINE 5389. RESEARCH MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSION. 3 Hours.

The student will collect scientific data in the Physiology of Exercise laboratories or in a work-related environment under the supervision of a faculty member. The student will analyze the data, write a manuscript, and submit a manuscript for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. This course must be taken in the final semester of graduate work and requires approval of the Graduate Advisor.

KINE 5390. SPECIAL TOPICS IN KINESIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

In-depth study of selected topics in physical education and exercise science. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

KINE 5392. SPECIAL TOPICS IN KINESIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

KINE 5393. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE INTERNSHIP. 3 Hours.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise physiology setting(e.g., physical medicine, athletic training, external laboratory, health/fitness facility, professional teams or sports management) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional.

KINE 5394. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology.

KINE 5396. RESEARCH IN ATHLECTIC TRAINING. 3 Hours.

Independent research under the supervision of an individual faculty member; may be repeated for credit with consent of Graduate Advisor. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

KINE 5397. INTERNSHIP ATHLETIC TRAINING. 3 Hours.

Individualized clinical experience in an external athletic training or other medical setting (e.g., physician's office, rehabilitation clinic, professional sports teams) under the direct supervision of a health care professional.

KINE 5398. THESIS. 3 Hours.

KINE 5420. CONCEPTS IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. 4 Hours.

Classroom and laboratory experiences that provide an introduction to the profession of Athletic Training with an emphasis on prevention and acute care of activity related injuries and illnesses. Specific topics will include injury prevention strategies; emergency first aid and acute care; superficial application of therapeutic modalities; nutritional considerations; and environmental considerations.

KINE 5430. ORTHOPEDIC ASSESSMENT I. 4 Hours.

A study of the common orthopedic injuries involving the lower extremities, with a special emphasis on recognition, evaluation, diagnosis, and initial management. Prerequisites: KINE 5120, KINE 5220, and KINE 5420.

KINE 5431. Orthopedic Assessment II. 4 Hours.

A study of the common orthopedic injuries involving the upper extremities, spine, head, and face with a special emphasis on recognition, evaluation, diagnosis, and initial management. Prerequisite: KINE 5430.

KINE 5432. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY. 4 Hours.

A study of acute and chronic illnesses and their response to, and impact on, physical activity. Discussion of pharmacological agents used in the care of general illnesses and musculoskeletal disorders in the physically active. Prerequisite: KINE 5430, KINE 5433, KINE 5130.

KINE 5433. THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS I. 4 Hours.

A study of the scientific theory and basic principles of musculoskeletal rehabilitation and therapeutic modalities. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the disablement model and learning how to plan, implement, document, and evaluate programs for the rehabilitation and reconditioning of injuries and illnesses of athletes and others involved with physical activity. Operation of superficial heating and cooling therapeutic modalities and how manual treatments (e.g., traction, muscle energy and massage) can be incorporated into a rehabilitation program will be investigated. The underlying principles and application techniques for each modality, therapeutic exercise progressions, patient clinical goals, legal and safe practice guidelines, and evidence based therapeutic modality science will allow for critical thinking and problem solving in relation to common lower extremity injuries. Both surgical and non-surgical rehabilitation models for the lower extremity will be discussed with a special emphasis on the use of functional progressions. Prerequisites: KINE 5420, KINE 5220, KINE 5120.

KINE 5434. THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS II. 4 Hours.

A study of the upper extremity and low back rehabilitation protocols and the use of electric therapeutic modalities (e.g., ultrasound, diathermy, laser, and electric stimulation). Emphasis will be placed on understanding the disablement model and learning how to plan, implement, document, and evaluate programs for the rehabilitation and reconditioning of injuries and illnesses of athletes and others involved with physical activity. Operation of electrical therapeutic modalities and how they can be incorporated into a rehabilitation program will be investigated. The underlying principles and application techniques for each modality, therapeutic exercise progressions, patient clinical goals, legal and safe practice guidelines, and evidence based therapeutic modality science will allow for critical thinking and problem solving in relation to common upper extremity and low back injuries. Both surgical and non-surgical rehabilitation models for the upper extremity and low back will be discussed with a special emphasis on the use of functional progressions. Prerequisite: KINE 5433.

KINE 5498. THESIS. 4 Hours.

KINE 5598. THESIS. 5 Hours.

KINE 5647. ALL-LEVEL TEACHER PREPARATION STUDENT TEACHING FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 6 Hours.

This supervised course is designed as a culminating field experience of pre-service professional preparation giving an opportunity to practically apply theoretical and pedagogical knowledge in real school settings. Applied experience will be attained in both Elementary and Secondary settings. A research project will be required to be arranged with course supervisor. Criminal background check required. Prerequisite: KINE 1315, KINE 2301, KINE 2302, KINE 3304, KINE 3388, KINE 4319, KINE 4320, KINE 4321, EDUC 5310, EDUC 5314, and LIST 5345.

KINE 5693. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE INTERNSHIP. 6 Hours.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise physiology setting (e.g., physical medicine, athletic training, external laboratory, health/fitness facility, professional teams or sports management) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional.

KINE 5694. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 6 Hours.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology.

KINE 5698. THESIS. 6 Hours.

KINE 5994. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 9 Hours.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology.

KINE 6100. SEMINAR IN KINESIOLOGY. 1 Hour.

Implements the research process with faculty guidance. Students will attend regularly scheduled lectures from internal and external faculty members. Learning activities based on student and faculty interest.

KINE 6103. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. 1 Hour.

The philosophy and methods of conducting a university class for undergraduates are examined. Specific tips and suggestions for managing course materials, lectures, audiovisual aids, grading, etc. will be presented. The role of the university instructor as a researcher as well as a teacher will be elaborated. Specific topics will include the ethics and regulation of research, service as a journal referee, corresponding with peers, participating in a research team, manuscript preparation, presentation at professional conferences, and submitting material for publication.

KINE 6105. LABORATORY TECHNIQUE ROTATIONS IN KINESIOLOGY I. 1 Hour.

A primary objective of this course is to further your understanding of lab work in Kinesiology. A second objective is to enhance your ability for critical thinking in Kinesiology through the scientific process. This includes formation of a research question, hypothesis, designing an experiment, and inferring conclusions from data. Secondary objectives include improving technology skills to assist collecting and analyzing data, and writing and oral communication skills for demonstrating understanding of the kinesiology principles. Prerequisite: Consent of faculty.

KINE 6106. LABORATORY TECHNIQUE ROTATIONS IN KINESIOLOGY II. 1 Hour.

A primary objective of this course is to further your understanding of lab work in Kinesiology. A second objective is to enhance your ability for critical thinking in Kinesiology through the scientific process. This includes formation of a research question, hypothesis, designing an experiment, and inferring conclusions from data. Secondary objectives include improving technology skills to assist collecting and analyzing data, and writing and oral communication skills for demonstrating understanding of the kinesiology principles. This section must occur in a different laboratory than KINE 6105. Prerequisite: KINE 6105 and consent of faculty.

KINE 6194. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 1 Hour.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology. May be repeated for credit with consent of the Graduate Advisor. Graded P/F/R. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

KINE 6293. GRANT WRITING. 2 Hours.

Students will learn strategies associated with grant applications. Students will prepare an individual proposal associated with a research grant application. Although submission for funding (e.g., pre-doctoral fellowship) is not required for the course, students will develop and complete a grant application.

KINE 6294. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 2 Hours.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology. May be repeated for credit with consent of the Graduate Advisor. Graded P/F/R. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

KINE 6394. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology. May be repeated for credit with consent of the Graduate Advisor. Graded P/F/R. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

KINE 6399. DISSERTATION. 3 Hours.

Preparation and submission of a doctoral dissertation in an area of kinesiology. Graded R/F only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. in Kinesiology.

KINE 6694. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 6 Hours.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology. May be repeated for credit with consent of the Graduate Advisor. Graded P/F/R. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

KINE 6699. DISSERTATION. 6 Hours.

Preparation and submission of a doctoral dissertation in an area of kinesiology. Graded R/F only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. in Kinesiology.

KINE 6999. DISSERTATION. 9 Hours.

Preparation and submission of a doctoral dissertation in an area of kinesiology. Graded R/F only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. in Kinesiology.

KINE 7399. DOCTORAL DEGREE COMPLETION. 3 Hours.

This course may be taken during the semester in which a student expects to complete all requirements for the doctoral degree and graduate. Enrolling in this course meets minimum enrollment requirements for graduation, for holding fellowships awarded by The Office of Graduate Studies and for full-time GTA or GRA positions. Students should verify that enrollment in this course meets other applicable enrollment requirements. To remain eligible in their final semester of study for grants, loans or other forms of financial aid administered by the Financial Aid Office must enroll in a minimum of 5 hours as required by the Office of Financial Aid. Other funding sources may also require more than 3-hours of enrollment. Additional hours may also be required to meet to requirements set by immigration law or by the policies of the student's degree program. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office, other sources of funding, Office of International Education and/or their graduate advisor to verify enrollment requirements before registering for this course. This course may only be taken once and may not be repeated. Students who do not complete all graduation requirements while enrolled in this course must enroll in a minimum of 6 dissertation hours (6699 or 6999) in their graduation term. Graded P/F/R.

Courses

NURS-EL 3300. COOPERATIVE NURSING WORK EXPERIENCE. 3 Hours.

Designed for nursing cooperative education students to integrate classroom study with career-related practical experience in the workplace. Must earn a C or better to earn credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NURS-EL 3347. SPECIALIZED TOPICS IN NURSING. 3 Hours.

Areas of special interest. May be repeated with varied topics. Must earn a C or better to earn credit. Prerequisite: Junior standing and consent of instructor.

NURS-EL 3352. THE LEGACY OF THE FAMILY. 3 Hours.

Explore and enhance understanding and application of the principles of family science knowledge in therapeutic relationships with families across the lifespan. Prerequisite: Computer Technology Skills continuing education course or permission of instructor (if taking online). Must earn a C or better for credit.

Courses

NURS-IS 3137. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1 Hour.

Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by the student and instructor. May be repeated with various topics. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NURS-IS 3237. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 2 Hours.

Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by the student and instructor. May be repeated with various topics. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NURS-IS 3337. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 3 Hours.

Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by the student and instructor. May be repeated with various topics. Must earn a grade of C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

NURS-IS 5370. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NURSING. 3 Hours.

Detailed in-depth study in a specific topic area. Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by student(s) and instructor prior to registration. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Graded F,R,P,W. Permission of instructor. Graduate standing.

Courses

NURS-MX 3337. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 3 Hours.

Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by the student and instructor. May be repeated with various topics. Must earn a grade of C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

NURS-MX 3637. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 6 Hours.

Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by the student and instructor. May be offered with any combination of lecture/lab hours. May be repeated with various topics. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Courses

NURS-SS 2232. LEARNING PROFESSIONAL NURSING AND LIFE SKILLS. 2 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to assist students who experience challenges with testing, time management, clinical practice, and/or professional behavior. Prerequisite: Admission to the BSN program.

Courses

NURSG 5302. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT IN NURSING EDUCATION. 3 Hours.

Explore the nature of nursing education. Focus on the curriculum process and its application to nursing education programs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

NURSG 5308. NURSING INFORMATICS. 3 Hours.

Focus on application of computer technology that supports the dissemination of health care data, information and knowledge. Selected software packages/applications are presented and used. Prerequisite: NURS 5367.

NURSG 5310. TEACHING AND LEARNING THEORIES AND STRATEGIES IN NURSING EDUCATION. 3 Hours.

Teaching/Learning theories, strategies, and evaluation for educators. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

NURSG 5311. NURSING MANAGEMENT IN THE HEALTH CARE ENVIRONMENT. 3 Hours.

Considers development of management and organizational theories as applied to health care organizations and their environment. Prerequisite: NURS 5367.

NURSG 5312. ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION STRATEGIES IN NURSING EDUCATION. 3 Hours.

Integration of concepts of assessment and evaluation into a nursing evaluation framework. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

NURSG 5318. ADVANCED PATHOPHYSIOLOGY FOR NURSE EDUCATORS. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on developing an advanced knowledge base of pathophysiology. Principles of advanced physiology and pathophysiology and are applied to disease processes. Prerequisite: NURS 5367 and NURS 5310 and NURS 5329 and NURS 5302 and NURS 5312.

NURSG 5319. ADVANCED PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSE EDUCATORS. 3 Hours.

Study of clinical pharmacological therapeutics for nurse educators, systems in health care. Prerequisite: NURS 5318.

NURSG 5326. ADVANCED ASSESSMENT FOR NURSE EDUCATORS. 3 Hours.

Apply theoretical foundations and clinical skills in comprehensive health assessment across the lifespan as applies to the nurse educator role. Prerequisite: NURS 5319.

NURSG 5327. EXPLORATION OF SCIENCE AND THEORIES FOR NURSING. 3 Hours.

This course provides a critical examination of the philosophical and theoretical bases for nursing science. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

NURSG 5329. ROLE OF THE NURSE EDUCATOR. 3 Hours.

Investigation of the roles and functions of the nurse educator. Prerequisite: Graduate program standing.

NURSG 5339. ROLES AND FUNCTIONS OF THE NURSE ADMINISTRATOR. 3 Hours.

Examine and implement administrative and managerial roles in health care organizations. Prerequisite: NURS 5311.

NURSG 5340. MANAGEMENT SEMINAR AND PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Synthesize management, organizational, and leadership concepts and theories in selected health care settings. Prerequisite: NURS 5308; NURS 5311; NURS 5339; NURS 5341: NURS 5343; NURS 5342; NURS 5382. Good Academic Standing (3.0 GPA).

NURSG 5341. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN NURSING. 3 Hours.

Analyze and apply financial management concepts to financial planning, budgeting, and reimbursement systems in health care. Prerequisite: NURS 5311.

NURSG 5342. MANAGEMENT OF NURSING OPERATIONS. 3 Hours.

Examine strategic planning for health care systems. Prerequisite: NURS 5311.

NURSG 5343. NURSING LEADERSHIP AND COMPLEX HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

Analyze leadership strategies in current and predicted health care systems including dimensions of workforce and workplace issues, leadership, and evidenced-based decision-making. Prerequisite: NURS 5367.

NURSG 5360. SIMULATION APPLICATION IN NURSING. 3 Hours.

Application of and active learning strategies in nursing education. Prerequisite: NURS 5367.

NURSG 5362. TEACHING PRACTICUM. 3 Hours.

Nursing education preceptorship in selected health care sites with opportunities to apply clinical and educational knowledge, skills, and concepts in a guided, progressive context of nursing education. Graded F,R,P,W. Prerequisite: NURS 5308 and NURS 5360 or concurrent enrollment; NURS 5329 and NURS 5302 and NURS 5326 and NURS 5310 and NURS 5312 and Good academic standing (GPA 3.0).

NURSG 5366. PRINCIPLES OF RESEARCH IN NURSING. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on integration of theoretical and empirical principles of nursing research to generate evidence for nursing practice. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

NURSG 5367. EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Preparation to lead evidence-based practice teams, to interpret best evidence, to plan for change, to evaluate outcomes, and to disseminate the project. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; NURS 5366 and NURS 5327.

NURSG 5382. NURSING AND HEALTH CARE POLICY: ISSUES AND ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

Analyze historical, current, and predicted national, state, and local health care policy processes. Prerequisite: NURS 5367.

Courses

NURS 2232. LEARNING PROFESSIONAL NURSING AND LIFE SKILLS. 2 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to assist students who experience challenges with testing, time management, clinical practice, and/or professional behavior. Prerequisite: Admission to the BSN program.

NURS 2300. INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL AND CLINICAL CONCEPTS IN NURSING. 3 Hours.

Designed to introduce the pre-nursing student to specific professional concepts in nursing as well as academic success strategies. Selected concepts and processes for professional nursing will include an introduction to nursing's theoretical, philosophical, ethical, and legal dimensions with an emphasis on professional formation. Course activities will focus on development of teamwork, communication skills, effective decision making and reflective practice.

NURS 3100. COOPERATIVE NURSING WORK EXPERIENCE. 1 Hour.

Designed for nursing cooperative education students to integrate classroom study with career-related practical experience in the workplace. Must earn C or better to earn credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NURS 3137. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1 Hour.

Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by the student and instructor. May be repeated with various topics. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NURS 3147. SPECIALIZED TOPICS IN NURSING. 1 Hour.

Areas of special interest. May be repeated with varied topics. Must complete with C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Junior standing and consent of instructor.

NURS 3200. COOPERATIVE NURSING WORK EXPERIENCE. 2 Hours.

Designed for nursing cooperative education students to integrate classroom study with career-related practical experience in the workplace. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NURS 3237. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 2 Hours.

Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by the student and instructor. May be repeated with various topics. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NURS 3247. SPECIALIZED TOPICS IN NURSING. 2 Hours.

Areas of special interest. May be repeated with varied topics. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Junior standing and consent of instructor.

NURS 3261. NURSING OF OLDER ADULTS. 2 Hours.

Selected concepts and issues related to aging and its impact on society and health care. Introduction to gerontologic nursing principles. Clinical application in diverse settings across the continuum of care. Prerequisite: NURS 3632, NURS 3320.

NURS 3300. COOPERATIVE NURSING WORK EXPERIENCE. 3 Hours.

Designed for nursing cooperative education students to integrate classroom study with career-related practical experience in the workplace. Must earn a C or better to earn credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NURS 3309. MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY FOR HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS. 3 Hours.

This course will enable the student to speak, use, and understand commonly used terms in the healthcare field. This course can be used as the upper division elective. Formerly taught as BIOL 3309. Credit will not be given for both. Must earn a C or better to earn credit.

NURS 3315. RN-BSN HOLISTIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT ACROSS THE LIFESPAN. 3 Hours.

Theory and practice of holistic health assessment of individuals and families across the life span designed for the registered nurse. RN-BSN students only. Prerequisite: or Corequisite NURS 3345 and NURS 3375.

NURS 3320. HOLISTIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT ACROSS THE LIFESPAN. 3 Hours.

Theory and practice of holistic health assessment of individuals and families across the life span with emphasis on normal findings. Prerequisite: NURS 3333 (or concurrent enrollment).

NURS 3321. NURSING RESEARCH. 3 Hours.

Basic concepts, processes and applications of nursing research. Research role of the nurse in decision making and clinical practice. Prerequisite: NURS 3632; Prerequisite or Corequisite: NURS 3561.

NURS 3325. RN-BSN HOLISTIC CARE OF THE OLDER ADULT. 3 Hours.

Introduction to gerontologic nursing principles and standards. Selected concepts and issues related to aging and its impact on society and health care. RN-BSN students only. Previously listed as NURS 3322. Prerequisite or Corequisite: NURS 3645.

NURS 3333. HEALTH PROMOTION ACROSS THE LIFESPAN. 3 Hours.

Focus on health promotion and disease prevention strategies that can reduce morbidity and mortality, promote healthy lifestyles and empower individuals and aggregates to become informed health care consumers. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the nursing program.

NURS 3335. RN-BSN PROMOTING HEALTHY LIFESTYLES. 3 Hours.

Health promotion for individuals and families. Opportunities to gain knowledge about primary prevention in health care. Importance of the role of the nurse in disease prevention and health promotion. RN-BSN students only. Previously NURS 3435. Prerequisite: or Corequisite NURS 3345.

NURS 3337. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 3 Hours.

Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by the student and instructor. May be repeated with various topics. Must earn a grade of C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

NURS 3344. ENHANCING NURSING PRACTICE AND SAFETY WITH HISPANIC PATIENTS THROUGH BETTER COMMUNICATION. 3 Hours.

Explores and augments the understanding of factors which facilitate or inhibit effective communication with Spanish-speaking clients. Focus on vocabulary specific to assessment and intervention with persons whose primary language is Spanish. Must make C or better for credit.

NURS 3345. ROLE TRANSITION TO PROFESSIONAL NURSING. 3 Hours.

Course addresses the role transition to Professional Nursing, nursing theory, ethics, decision making, critical thinking/clinical judgment, introduction to evidence-based practice, and informatics/technology in practice. Identifies strategies for personal and professional empowerment. Prerequisite: Accepted to RN to BSN program. Prerequisite or co-requisite ENGL 2338. May not drop ENGL 2338 if taken as a co-requisite.

NURS 3347. SPECIALIZED TOPICS IN NURSING. 3 Hours.

Areas of special interest. May be repeated with varied topics. Must earn a C or better to earn credit. Prerequisite: Junior standing and consent of instructor.

NURS 3352. THE LEGACY OF THE FAMILY. 3 Hours.

Explore and enhance understanding and application of the principles of family science knowledge in therapeutic relationships with families across the lifespan. Prerequisite: Computer Technology Skills continuing education course or permission of instructor (if taking online). Must earn a C or better for credit.

NURS 3365. PHARMACOLOGY IN NURSING PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Introduction to current concepts of pharmacology and their relationship to nursing practice. Included are basic principles of drug actions, side effects for major drug classifications, and the role of the nurse in drug therapeutics. Must be taken no more than three years prior to acceptance into the nursing program. Prerequisite: BIOL 2457, BIOL 2458, CHEM 1451.

NURS 3366. PATHOPHYSIOLOGIC PROCESSES: IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING. 3 Hours.

Pathophysiologic alterations, their interactions, and effects on persons across the life span as a basis for therapeutic nursing interventions. Must be taken no more than three years prior to acceptance into the nursing program. Prerequisite: BIOL 2457, BIOL 2458, CHEM 1451.

NURS 3375. HEALTH POLICY AND LEGAL ASPECTS OF PROFESSIONAL NURSING. 3 Hours.

Course addresses health policy, legislative and political concerns, nurse practice act, legal and ethical aspects that impact the practice of professional nursing in contemporary health care. Prerequisite: NURS 3345.

NURS 3437. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 4 Hours.

Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by the student and instructor. May be repeated with various topics. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NURS 3447. SPECIALIZED TOPICS IN NURSING. 4 Hours.

Areas of special interest. May be repeated with varied topics. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Junior standing and consent of instructor.

NURS 3481. PSYCHIATRIC MENTAL HEALTH NURSING OF INDIVIDUALS, FAMILIES, AND GROUPS. 4 Hours.

Application of the nursing process with emphasis on critical thinking, therapeutic nursing interventions, and effective communication and interpersonal skills as they relate to persons with psychiatric mental health conditions. Prerequisite: NURS 3632.

NURS 3537. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 5 Hours.

Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by the student and instructor. May be repeated with various topics. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NURS 3547. SPECIALIZED TOPICS IN NURSING. 5 Hours.

Areas of special interest. May be repeated with varied topics. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Junior standing and consent of instructor.

NURS 3561. NURSING OF ADULTS. 5 Hours.

Application of the nursing process with emphasis on critical thinking, therapeutic nursing interventions, and effective communication for persons experiencing medical-surgical problems. Theory and clinical application in diverse settings. Prerequisite: NURS 3632.

NURS 3632. CLINICAL NURSING FOUNDATIONS. 6 Hours.

Basic therapeutic nursing interventions with individuals and families in diverse settings using nursing process framework. Prerequisite or Corequisite: NURS 3320, NURS 3333.

NURS 3637. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 6 Hours.

Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by the student and instructor. May be offered with any combination of lecture/lab hours. May be repeated with various topics. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NURS 3647. SPECIALIZED TOPICS IN NURSING. 6 Hours.

Areas of special interest. May be repeated with varied topics. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: junior standing and consent of instructor.

NURS 4100. COOPERATIVE NURSING WORK EXPERIENCE. 1 Hour.

Designed for nursing cooperative education students to integrate classroom study with career-related practical experience in the workplace. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NURS 4200. COOPERATIVE NURSING WORK EXPERIENCE. 2 Hours.

Designed for nursing cooperative education students to integrate classroom study with career-related practical experience in the workplace. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NURS 4223. PROFESSIONAL NURSING TRENDS. 2 Hours.

Analysis of societal issues and trends influencing health care. Application of ethical, legal, economic, and political concepts. Identification of strategies for personal and professional empowerment. Prerequisite: NURS 4431, NURS 4441, and NURS 4581.

NURS 4300. COOPERATIVE NURSING WORK EXPERIENCE. 3 Hours.

Designed for nursing cooperative education student to integrate classroom study with career-related practical experience in the workplace. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NURS 4307. US ARMY ROTC NURSE SUMMER TRAINING PROGRAM. 3 Hours.

A voluntary, paid three-week clinical elective for nurse cadets. The primary focus is to provide nurse cadets with at least 120 hours of clinical experience utilizing military, leadership, clinical nursing, administrative and interpersonal skills working side-by-side with an Army Nurse Corps officer preceptor. Prerequisite: 3 years of ROTC, NURS 3561.

NURS 4325. RN-BSN NURSING RESEARCH. 3 Hours.

Basic concepts, processes and applications of nursing research. Research role of the nurse in decision making and clinical practice. RN-BSN students only. Prerequisite: MATH 1308, or equivalent and NURS 3645. (Previously offered as NURS 4321.).

NURS 4350. CAPSTONE: Transition to Professional Nursing. 3 Hours.

Focus on the synthesis of knowledge acquired throughout the curriculum and the enactment of the professional nurse role in a concentrated practicum. Prerequisite or Corequisite: NURS 4351, NURS 4462, NURS 4223.

NURS 4351. BSN NURSING LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Exploration of organizational strategies, leadership theories and societal trends with implications for decision making in health care. Introduction to management skills needed by professional nurses with clinical application in diverse settings. Prerequisites: NURS 4431, NURS 4441, NURS 4581.

NURS 4360. CULTURAL VARIATION IN HEALTH CARE: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF TWO CULTURES. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to further develop an awareness, understanding and appreciation of the cultural factors that underlie a person's way of living. This course will increase the practitioner's ability to make in-depth assessments of the cultural influences upon the individual's health care status and will develop the ability to deliver culturally sensitive, safe and effective care. Through the study of one specific cultural group, the Mexican culture. Students will gain knowledge, skills and principles that will enable them to generalize to other cultural groups. Must earn C or better for credit.

NURS 4393. NURSING CERTIFICATION. 3 Hours.

NURS 4431. NURSING OF CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS. 4 Hours.

Nursing care for infants, children, adolescents, and their families. Theory and clinical application in diverse settings. Prerequisite: NURS 3561, NURS 3481.

NURS 4441. NURSING OF THE CHILDBEARING FAMILY. 4 Hours.

Application of the nursing process with emphasis on critical thinking, communication and therapeutic nursing interventions as related to care of individuals and families during the childbearing experience. Prerequisite: NURS 3481 and NURS 3561.

NURS 4455. RN-BSN NURSING LEADERSHIP & MANAGEMENT. 4 Hours.

Exploration of organizational strategies, leadership theories and societal trends with implications for decision making in health care. Introduction to management skills needed by professional nurses with clinical application in diverse settings. RN-BSN students only. Prerequisite or Corequisite: NURS 3645.

NURS 4462. COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING. 4 Hours.

Integrate knowledge from nursing theory and public health science in assessing health care needs of aggregates, communities, and society. Prerequisite: NURS 4431, NURS 4441, NURS 4581.

NURS 4465. RN-BSN CARE OF VULNERABLE POPULATIONS ACROSS THE LIFESPAN. 4 Hours.

Integrates knowledge from nursing theory and public health science in assessing health care needs of aggregates, communities, and society for the Registered Nurse. RN-BSN students only. Prerequisite: NURS 3345.

NURS 4581. NURSING OF ADULTS WITH COMPLEX NEEDS. 5 Hours.

Use of critical thinking, therapeutic nursing interventions and communication skills in promoting quality of life for persons with complex health needs. Application of nursing roles in diverse settings. Prerequisite: NURS 3561, NURS 3481.

NURS 4655. CULTURAL VARIATION IN HEALTH CARE: COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF TWO CULTURES. 6 Hours.

A comparative analysis of two cultures and the influences of cultural beliefs and practices upon the delivery of health care. Includes field study in a foreign country. Must earn C or better for credit. Prerequisite: Completion of Junior I required nursing courses and consent of instructor.

NURS 4685. RN-BSN CAPSTONE. 6 Hours.

Synthesis of knowledge acquired in the RN-BSN curriculum and development of the Nurse Role with evolving professional issues, health care environment, lifelong learning, and promotion of the Nursing profession designed for Registered Nurses RN-BSN student only. Prerequisite: NURS 4325, NURS 4455 Corequisite: NURS 4465.

NURS 5110. NEONATAL ASSESSMENT LAB. 1 Hour.

Conduct comprehensive health assessment in the neonatal population. Prerequisite: NURS 5220 or concurrent enrollment or permission of instructor or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5120. ADULT-GERONTOLOGY ASSESSMENT LAB. 1 Hour.

Conduct comprehensive health assessment in the adult-gerontology population. Prerequisite: NURS 5220 or concurrent enrollment or permission of instructor or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5130. PEDIATRIC ASSESSMENT LAB. 1 Hour.

Conduct comprehensive health assessment in the pediatric population. Prerequisite: NURS 5220 or concurrent enrollment or permission of instructor or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5170. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NURSING. 1 Hour.

Detailed in-depth study in a specific topic area. Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by student(s) and instructor prior to registration. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Graded F, P, R. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

NURS 5190. TOPICS IN NURSING. 1 Hour.

Selected topics in advanced nursing. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

NURS 5204. NEONATAL NURSING I. 2 Hours.

Clinical management of the high-risk neonate with a focus on the perinatal and transition periods as well as stabilization of the ill newborn at birth. Includes fluid and electrolyte management, nutrition, and identification of the indications and complications associated with invasive skills and procedures relevant to the high-risk neonate. Prerequisite: NURS 5315; NURS 5316 or NURS 5220 or concurrent enrollment and NURS 5110 or concurrent enrollment or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5210. NEUROSCIENTIFIC BASES IN PSYCHIATRY AND MENTAL HEALTH. 2 Hours.

This course provides the scientific foundations of neurobiology for various psychiatric disorders and mental health problems across the lifespan. An analysis of the relationships between neurobiology, psychopharmacology and genetics for various psychiatric disorders and mental health problems will be provided. Prerequisite: NURS 5315, NURS 5418 or NURS 5220, NURS 5350, or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5211. DIAGNOSTIC PRINCIPLES IN PSYCHIATRY AND MENTAL HEALTH. 2 Hours.

This course provides the scientific foundations for diagnostics for various psychiatric disorders and mental health problems across the lifespan. Prerequisite: NURS 5315; NURS 5210 or concurrent enrollment or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5212. THERAPY CONCEPTS FOR THE PSYCHIATRIC MENTAL HEALTH NURSE PRACTITIONER. 2 Hours.

This course provides evidenced based practice principles of non-pharmacological individual, family and group therapies for psychiatric disorders and mental health problems across the lifespan. Prerequisite: NURS 5315; NURS 5210, NURS 5211 or concurrent enrollment or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5220. ADVANCED HEALTH ASSESSMENT AND DIAGNOSTIC REASONING. 2 Hours.

Apply theoretical foundations of comprehensive health assessment across the lifespan. Prerequisite: Graduate or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5270. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NURSING. 2 Hours.

Detailed in-depth study in a specific topic area. Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by student(s) and instructor prior to registration. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Graded F, P, R. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing and permission of instructor.

NURS 5290. TOPICS IN NURSING. 2 Hours.

Selected topics in advanced nursing. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

NURS 5302. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT IN NURSING EDUCATION. 3 Hours.

Explore the nature of nursing education. Focus on the curriculum process and its application to nursing education programs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

NURS 5303. PSYCHIATRIC MANAGEMENT IN ADVANCED NURSING PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Foundations of clinical management for commonly occurring psychiatric-mental health problems across the lifespan. Prerequisites: NURS 5334 and NURS 5418 or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5305. ADULT MANAGEMENT IN ADVANCED NURSING PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Foundations of clinical management for commonly occurring conditions of adults in primary care. Prerequisites: NURS 5418, NURS 5334 or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5306. PEDIATRIC MANAGEMENT IN ADVANCED NURSING PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Foundations of advanced clinical practice in the primary care of children, birth to 21 years with a family centered approach on growth and development, health promotion and management of common health problems. Prerequisites: NURS 5418, NURS 5334 or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5308. NURSING INFORMATICS. 3 Hours.

Focus on application of computer technology that supports the dissemination of health care data, information and knowledge. Selected software packages/applications are presented and used. Prerequisite: NURS 5367.

NURS 5310. TEACHING AND LEARNING THEORIES AND STRATEGIES IN NURSING EDUCATION. 3 Hours.

Teaching/Learning theories, strategies, and evaluation for educators. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

NURS 5311. NURSING MANAGEMENT IN THE HEALTH CARE ENVIRONMENT. 3 Hours.

Considers development of management and organizational theories as applied to health care organizations and their environment. Prerequisite: NURS 5367.

NURS 5312. ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION STRATEGIES IN NURSING EDUCATION. 3 Hours.

Integration of concepts of assessment and evaluation into a nursing evaluation framework. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

NURS 5313. CLINICAL PROCEDURES FOR ADVANCED PRACTICE NURSES. 3 Hours.

A theory and clinical procedures course designed for the Advanced Practice Nurse to acquire skills and procedures in the clinical management of selected patients. Prerequisite: NURS 5418 or NURS 5220 or concurrent enrollment and NURS 5334 or concurrent enrollment or Certificate program standing.

NURS 5314. INVASIVE PROCEDURES FOR ADVANCED PRACTICE NURSES. 3 Hours.

A theory and clinical procedures course designed for the Advanced Practice Nurse to acquire invasive skills and procedures in the clinical management of selected patients. Prerequisite: NURS 5418 or concurrent enrollment and NURS 5334 or concurrent enrollment or Certificate Program standing.

NURS 5315. ADVANCED PATHOPHYSIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Builds on a previous understanding fo anatomy and physiology and focuses on developing advanced knowledge of physiologic and pathophysiologic concepts across the life span. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

NURS 5316. ADVANCED HEALTH ASSESSMENT IN NURSING PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Apply theoretical foundations and clinical skills in comprehensive health assessment across the lifespan. Prerequisite: NURS 5366 and NURS 5315; or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5318. ADVANCED PATHOPHYSIOLOGY FOR NURSE EDUCATORS. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on developing an advanced knowledge base of pathophysiology. Principles of advanced physiology and pathophysiology and are applied to disease processes. Prerequisite: NURS 5367 and NURS 5310 and NURS 5329 and NURS 5302 and NURS 5312.

NURS 5319. ADVANCED PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSE EDUCATORS. 3 Hours.

Study of clinical pharmacological therapeutics for nurse educators, systems in health care. Prerequisite: NURS 5318.

NURS 5322. CHILD, ADOLESCENT AND GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRIC MENTAL HEALTH FOR THE PSYCH NP. 3 Hours.

This course provides the scientific foundations and evidenced based practice principles necessary for managing children, adolescents, and geriatric populations with (and/or at risk for) various commonly-occurring and complex psychiatric disorders and mental health problems and comorbid medical illnesses. Prerequisite: NURS 5210 and NURS 5211. NURS 5212 or concurrent enrollment or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5323. ADULT PSYCHIATRIC MENTAL HEALTH FOR THE PSYCHIATRIC MENTAL HEALTH NURSE PRACTITIONER. 3 Hours.

This course provides the scientific foundations and evidence based practice principles necessary for managing adults with (and/or at risk) for commonly occurring and complex psychiatric disorders and mental health problems as well as co-morbid medical illnesses. Prerequisite: NURS 5210 and NURS 5211. NURS 5212 or concurrent enrollment; NURS 5322 or concurrent enrollment or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5324. PSYCHIATRIC MENTAL CLINICAL PRACTICE I. 3 Hours.

This course provides application of theoretical knowledge and clinical skills to patients with commonly occurring psychiatric and mental health disorders across the life span in the context of advanced nursing practice. Prerequisite: NURS 5322 or concurrent enrollment; 5323 or concurrent enrollment or Certificate Program Standing. Good academic standing (GPA 3.0).

NURS 5325. PSYCHIATRIC MENTAL HEALTH CLINICAL PRACTICE II. 3 Hours.

This course provides application of theoretical knowledge and clinical skills to patients with various commonly occurring and complex psychiatric and mental health disorders across the life span in the context of advanced nursing practice. Prerequisite: NURS 5322 and NURS 5323; NURS 5324 or concurrent enrollment or Certificate Program Standing. Good academic standing (GPA 3.0).

NURS 5326. ADVANCED ASSESSMENT FOR NURSE EDUCATORS. 3 Hours.

Apply theoretical foundations and clinical skills in comprehensive health assessment across the lifespan as applies to the nurse educator role. Prerequisite: NURS 5319.

NURS 5327. EXPLORATION OF SCIENCE AND THEORIES FOR NURSING. 3 Hours.

This course provides a critical examination of the philosophical and theoretical bases for nursing science. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

NURS 5329. ROLE OF THE NURSE EDUCATOR. 3 Hours.

Investigation of the roles and functions of the nurse educator. Prerequisite: Graduate program standing.

NURS 5331. ADVANCED CLINICAL NURSING PRACTICUM. 3 Hours.

Clinical preceptorships in selected health practice sites with opportunities to apply knowledge, skills, and concepts in a guided, progressive context of advanced nursing practice. The ratio of credit to clinical hours is 1:4. Graded: F,R,P,W. Prerequisite: NURS 5337 or NURS 5338 or NURS 5372 or NURS 5374 or NURS 5353 or NURS 5355 or NURS 5425 or NURS 5431 or NURS 5436 or NURS 5444 or NURS 5447 or NURS 5450 or NURS 5453 or NURS 5621 or concurrent enrollment. Good academic standing (GPA 3.0) or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5332. ADVANCED CLINICAL NURSING PRACTICUM. 3 Hours.

Clinical preceptorships in selected health practice sites with opportunities to apply knowledge, skills, and concepts in a guided, progressive context of advanced nursing practice. The ratio of credit to clinical hours is 1 to 4. Graded F,R,P,W. Prerequisites: NURS 5337 or NURS 5338 or NURS 5372 or NURS 5374 or NURS 5353 or NURS 5355 or NURS 5425 or NURS 5431 or NURS 5436 or NURS 5444 or NURS 5447 or NURS 5450 or NURS 5453 or NURS 5621 or concurrent enrollment. Good academic standing (GPA 3.0) or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5333. FAMILY I. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on advanced concepts and knowledge for nurse practitioner primary care management of designated acute, chronic and complex health problems of individuals and families across the lifespan. Particular emphasis will be on pediatric wellness, women's health, men's health, and geriatrics concepts and conditions. Prerequisite: NURS 5418 or NURS 5220 and NURS 5334 and NURS 5313 or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5334. ADVANCED PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSE PRACTITIONERS. 3 Hours.

Study of clinical pharmacological therapeutics for advanced nursing practice. Prerequisites: NURS 5315 or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5335. FAMILY II. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on advanced concepts and knowledge for nurse practitioner primary care management of commonly occurring conditions seen in primary care patients across the lifespan. Prerequisite: NURS 5418 or NURS 5220 and NURS 5334 and NURS 5313 or Certificate Program standing.

NURS 5336. FAMILY III. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on advanced concepts and knowledge for nurse practitioner primary care management of designated acute, chronic and complex health problems of individuals and families across the lifespan. Particular emphasis will be on adult wellness, psychiatric, and cardiometabolic concepts and conditions. Prerequisite: NURS 5418 or NURS 5220 and NURS 5334 and NURS 5313 or Certificate Program standing.

NURS 5337. FAMILY CLINICAL PRACTICE 1. 3 Hours.

Initial clinical preceptorship in selected primary health practice sites with opportunities to apply knowledge and concepts of advanced nursing practice implementing the family nurse practitioner role in evidenced based patient care. Prerequisite: NURS 5333, NURS 5335, NURS 5336 and Good academic standing (GPA 3.0) or certificate program standing.

NURS 5338. FAMILY CLINICAL PRACTICE 2. 3 Hours.

Continued clinical preceptorship with opportunities for increased clinical knowledge in selected primary health practice sites with opportunities to apply knowledge and concepts of advanced nursing practice implementing the family nurse practitioner role in evidenced based patient care. Prerequisite: NURS 5333, NURS 5335, NURS 5336, NURS 5337 or concurrent enrollment; Good academic standing (GPA 3.0) or Certificate Program standing.

NURS 5339. ROLES AND FUNCTIONS OF THE NURSE ADMINISTRATOR. 3 Hours.

Examine and implement administrative and managerial roles in health care organizations. Prerequisite: NURS 5311.

NURS 5340. MANAGEMENT SEMINAR AND PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Synthesize management, organizational, and leadership concepts and theories in selected health care settings. Prerequisite: NURS 5308; NURS 5311; NURS 5339; NURS 5341: NURS 5343; NURS 5342; NURS 5382. Good Academic Standing (3.0 GPA).

NURS 5341. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN NURSING. 3 Hours.

Analyze and apply financial management concepts to financial planning, budgeting, and reimbursement systems in health care. Prerequisite: NURS 5311.

NURS 5342. MANAGEMENT OF NURSING OPERATIONS. 3 Hours.

Examine strategic planning for health care systems. Prerequisite: NURS 5311.

NURS 5343. NURSING LEADERSHIP AND COMPLEX HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

Analyze leadership strategies in current and predicted health care systems including dimensions of workforce and workplace issues, leadership, and evidenced-based decision-making. Prerequisite: NURS 5367.

NURS 5350. ROLE OF THE NURSE IN ADVANCED PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Theory and application of the multiple roles of the advanced practice nurse within the health care system. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

NURS 5352. ADULT GERONTOLOGY PRIMARY CARE CLINICAL PRACTICE 1. 3 Hours.

Clinical experience in primary and long term health care settings with focus on managing adolescents, adults, and elders with common episodic acute and chronic health care needs. Prerequisite: NURS 5461 and NURS 5462 or concurrent enrollment; Good academic standing (GPA 3.0) or certificate program standing.

NURS 5353. ADULT GERONTOLOGY PRIMARY CARE CLINICAL PRACTICE 2. 3 Hours.

Continued clinical experience in primary and long term health care settings with focus on managing adolescents, adults, and elders with common episodic acute and chronic health care needs. Prerequisite: NURS 5461 and NURS 5462 and NURS 5352 or concurrent enrollment and Good academic standing (GPA 3.0) or certificate program standing.

NURS 5354. ADULT GERONTOLOGY ACUTE CARE CLINICAL PRACTICE 1. 3 Hours.

Clinical experience in specialty practice and high acuity health care settings with focus on managing adolescents, adults, and elders with common secondary and tertiary health care needs. Prerequisite: NURS 5461; NURS 5463 or concurrent enrollment and Good academic standing (GPA 3.0) or certificate program standing.

NURS 5355. ADULT GERONTOLOGY ACUTE CARE CLINICAL PRACTICE 2. 3 Hours.

Continued clinical experience in specialty practice and high acuity health care settings with focus on managing adolescents, adults, and elders with common secondary and tertiary health care needs. Prerequisite: NURS 5354 or concurrent enrollment; NURS 5463 and Good academic standing (GPA 3.0) or certificate program standing.

NURS 5360. SIMULATION APPLICATION IN NURSING. 3 Hours.

Application of and active learning strategies in nursing education. Prerequisite: NURS 5367.

NURS 5362. TEACHING PRACTICUM. 3 Hours.

Nursing education preceptorship in selected health care sites with opportunities to apply clinical and educational knowledge, skills, and concepts in a guided, progressive context of nursing education. Graded F,R,P,W. Prerequisite: NURS 5308 and NURS 5360 or concurrent enrollment; NURS 5329 and NURS 5302 and NURS 5326 and NURS 5310 and NURS 5312 and Good academic standing (GPA 3.0).

NURS 5366. PRINCIPLES OF RESEARCH IN NURSING. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on integration of theoretical and empirical principles of nursing research to generate evidence for nursing practice. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

NURS 5367. EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Preparation to lead evidence-based practice teams, to interpret best evidence, to plan for change, to evaluate outcomes, and to disseminate the project. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; NURS 5366 and NURS 5327.

NURS 5370. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NURSING. 3 Hours.

Detailed in-depth study in a specific topic area. Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by student(s) and instructor prior to registration. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Graded F,R,P,W. Permission of instructor. Graduate standing.

NURS 5371. PEDIATRIC PRIMARY CARE CLINICAL PRACTICE 1. 3 Hours.

Initial clinical preceptorship in selected primary health practice sites with opportunities to apply knowledge and concepts of advanced nursing practice implementing the pediatric nurse practitioner role in evidenced based patient care. Prerequisite: NURS 5465. Good academic standing (GPA 3.0) or Certificate program standing.

NURS 5372. PEDIATRIC PRIMARY CARE CLINICAL PRACTICE 2. 3 Hours.

Continue clinical preceptorship in selected primary health practice sites with opportunities to apply knowledge and concepts of advanced nursing practice implementing the pediatric nurse practitioner role in evidenced based patient care. Prerequisite: NURS 5371 or concurrent enrollment. Good academic standing (GPA 3.0) or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5373. PEDIATRIC ACUTE CARE CLINICAL PRACTICE 1. 3 Hours.

Initial clinical preceptorship in selected acute and chronic care health practice sites with opportunities to apply knowledge and concepts of advanced nursing practice implementing the pediatric acute care nurse practitioner role in evidenced based patient care. Prerequisite: NURS 5467 or concurrent enrollment. Good academic standing (GPA 3.0) or Certificate program standing.

NURS 5374. PEDIATRIC ACUTE CARE CLINICAL PRACTICE 2. 3 Hours.

Continue clinical preceptorship in selected acute and chronic care health practice sites with opportunities to apply knowledge and concepts of advanced nursing practice implementing the pediatric nurse practitioner role in evidenced based patient care. Prerequisite: NURS 5373.

NURS 5380. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN RESEARCH. 3 Hours.

Detailed study and participation in a faculty sponsored research project. Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by the student and instructor prior to registration. Permission of instructor. Graded F,R,P,W.

NURS 5382. NURSING AND HEALTH CARE POLICY: ISSUES AND ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

Analyze historical, current, and predicted national, state, and local health care policy processes. Prerequisite: NURS 5367.

NURS 5388. STATISTICS FOR HEALTH CARE. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with the basic knowledge and skills to effectively use biostatistics in different research design and data analysis, and to understand articles in related professional journals. Topics include choosing correct statistical methods and study designs in nursing research and practice; descriptive statistics; probability and probability distributions; estimation and hypothesis testing, simple linear regression, introduction to analysis of variance and an introduction to the use of statistical software packages. Prerequisite: Undergraduate Statistics.

NURS 5390. TOPICS IN NURSING. 3 Hours.

Selected topics in advanced nursing. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

NURS 5393. ADVANCED CLINICAL NURSING PRACTICE I. 3 Hours.

Development of advanced knowledge base of specialized clinical concepts and the application of this knowledge in selected clinical areas. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

NURS 5398. THESIS. 3 Hours.

Graded F,R.

NURS 5418. ADVANCED HEALTH ASSESSMENT AND DIAGNOSTIC REASONING. 4 Hours.

Apply theoretical foundations and clinical skills in comprehensive health assessment across the lifespan. Prerequisites: NURS 5315 and NURS 5366 or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5424. PSYCHIATRIC-MENTAL HEALTH NURSING I. 4 Hours.

Advanced clinical management of individuals, families, and groups at risk for and experiencing acute and chronic psychiatric disorders. Prerequisite: NURS 5303; NURS 5305 or NURS 5306 or concurrent enrollment, or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5425. PSYCHIATRIC-MENTAL HEALTH NURSING II. 4 Hours.

Advanced clinical management of individuals, families, and groups at risk for and experiencing complex psychiatric disorders. Prerequisites: NURS 5328 or NURS 5367 and NURS 5424; NURS 5306 or NURS 5305 or concurrent enrollment or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5430. FAMILY NURSING I. 4 Hours.

Focus on advanced knowledge of acute, chronic, and complex health problems in the primary care management of individuals across the lifespan. Prerequisites: NURS 5305 and NURS 5306 or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5431. FAMILY NURSING II. 4 Hours.

Focus on advanced knowledge in the management of patients and families throughout the lifespan. Prerequisite: NURS 5328 or NURS 5367 and NURS 5430; NURS 5303 or concurrent enrollment; NURS 5313 or NURS 5314 or concurrent enrollment. Or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5435. ADULT GERONTOLOGY ACUTE CARE NURSING I. 4 Hours.

Focuses on advanced knowledge of medical-surgical nursing in managing adults with secondary and tertiary health care needs. Prerequisite: NURS 5305 or Certificate Program standing.

NURS 5436. ADULT GERONTOLOGY ACUTE CARE NURSING II. 4 Hours.

Focuses on an interdisciplinary approach to the management and coordination of secondary and tertiary care for adults with complex multisystem dysfunction. Prerequisites: NURS 5328 or NURS 5367 and NURS 5435 and NURS 5314 or concurrent enrollment; NURS 5303 or concurrent enrollment or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5441. ACUTE CARE PEDIATRIC NURSING. 4 Hours.

Focus is on advanced, interdisciplinary practice to assess, diagnose, and manage acute and critical, single and multi-system health problems of children birth to 21 years in secondary and tertiary care settings. Prerequisites: NURS 5306; NURS 5442 or concurrent enrollment; or Certificate Program standing.

NURS 5442. PRIMARY CARE PEDIATRIC NURSING. 4 Hours.

Focus is on integration of acquired theoretical and empirical knowledge in the assessment, diagnosis, and management of multiple common acute and stable chronic health problems in children birth to 21 years. Prerequisite: NURS 5306; or Certificate Program standing.

NURS 5444. ADVANCED NURSING CARE OF PEDIATRIC PATIENTS WITH COMPLEX PROBLEMS. 4 Hours.

Clinical management of complex health problems of pediatric patients birth to 21 years within the family system. Prerequisites: NURS 5328 or NURS 5367 and NURS 5441 or NURS 5442 and NURS 5303 or concurrent enrollment; or Certificate Program standing.

NURS 5447. NEONATAL NURSING III. 4 Hours.

Clinical management of the high-risk neonate using evidence based knowledge, research, pharmacological, and technological therapies. Focus on the following systems: hematologic, skeletal, integumentary, immunologic, and metabolic/endocrine. Includes clinical management of complex health problems affecting infants (birth to 2 years of age) and their families including chronic care and ethical issues. Prerequisite: NURS 5537 or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5450. NEONATAL NP CLINICAL PRACTICE. 4 Hours.

Integration of clinical management of the high-risk neonate through clinical preceptorships in selected health practice sites with application of knowledge, skills and concepts in a guilded, progressive context of advanced nursing practice. The ratio of credit to clinical hours is 1:4. Prerequisites: NURS 5334 and NURS 5316 or NURS 5220 and NURS 5204 and NURS 5537 or concurrent enrollment and Good academic standing (GPA 3.0) or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5461. ADULT GERONTOLOGY MANAGEMENT ACROSS THE CONTINUUM OF CARE. 4 Hours.

Foundations of advanced knowledge of common acute and chronic health problems in adolescents, adults, and elders across health care settings. Prerequisite: NURS 5316 or NURS 5418 or NURS 5220 and NURS 5334, and NURS 5367 or concurrent enrollment, or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5462. ADULT GERONTOLOGY PRIMARY CARE. 4 Hours.

Focus on interdisciplinary approach and advanced knowledge in the management of adults from adolescence through old age, their families, and communities in a variety of health care settings. Prerequisite: NURS 5461 or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5463. ADULT GERONTOLOGY ACUTE CARE. 4 Hours.

Focuses on a collaborative, interdisciplinary approach in the management of acutely ill physiologically unstable adolescent, adult, and gerontology patients with complex multi-system dysfunction. Prerequisite: NURS 5461 or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5465. PRIMARY PEDIATRIC CARE. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on advanced concepts and knowledge for nurse practitioners management of designated minor acute, chronic and complex health problems of pediatric patients and their families in primary care healthcare settings. Prerequisite: NURS 5334 and NURS 5316 or NURS 5220; NURS 5367 or concurrent enrollment.

NURS 5466. PEDIATRIC ACUTE CARE. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on advanced concepts and knowledge for nurse practitioner management of designated critical, acute, chronic and complex health problems of pediatric patients and their families in an acute care facility. Prerequisite: NURS 5465.

NURS 5467. PEDIATRIC COMPLEX CARE. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on advanced concepts and knowledge for nurse practitioner management of designated acute, chronic and complex health problems of pediatric patients and their families in multiple healthcare settings. Prerequisite: NURS 5465 or concurrent enrollment or Certificate program standing.

NURS 5470. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NURSING. 4 Hours.

Detailed in-depth study in a specific topic area. Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by student(s) and instructor prior to registration. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Graded F,R,P,W.

NURS 5537. NEONATAL NURSING II. 5 Hours.

Clinical management of the high-risk neonate using evidence based-knowledge, research, pharmacological, and technological therapies. Focus on the following systems: pulmonary, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, hepatic, renal, and neurologic. Prerequisite: NURS 5204 and NURS 5334 and NURS 5316 or NURS 5220; NURS 5367 or concurrent enrollment or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5631. ADVANCED CLINICAL NURSING PRACTICUM. 6 Hours.

Clinical preceptorships in selected health practice sites with opportunities to apply knowledge, skills and concepts in a guided, progressive context of advanced nursing practice. The ratio of credit to clinical hours is 1:4. Graded F,I,P,W. Prerequisite: NURS 5324 or NURS 5325 or NURS 5337 or NURS 5338 or NURS 5352 or NURS 5353 or NURS 5354 or NURS 5355 or NURS 5371 or NURS 5372 or NURS 5373 or NURS 5374 or NURS 5424 or NURS 5425 or NURS 5431 or NURS 5436 or NURS 5444 or NURS 5447 or NURS 5450 or NURS 5453 or NURS 5621 or concurrent enrollment. Good Academic standing (GPA 3.0) or Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5632. ADVANCED CLINICAL NURSING PRACTICUM - CERT. 6 Hours.

Clinical preceptorships in selected health practice sites with opportunities to apply knowledge, skills, and concepts in a guided, progressive context of advanced nursing practice. The ratio of credit to clinical hours is 1:4. Graded: F,I,P,W. Prerequisite: NURS 5324 or NURS 5325 or NURS 5424 or NURS 5425 or NURS 5431 or NURS 5337, NURS 5436 or NURS 5444 or NURS 5338 or NURS 5453 or NURS 5450 or NURS 5447 or NURS 5621 or NURS 5371 or NURS 5372 or NURS 5373 or NURS 5374 or NURS 5352 or NURS 5353 or NURS 5354 or NURS 5355 or concurrent enrollment. Good academic standing (GPA 3.0) and Certificate Program Standing.

NURS 5670. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NURSING. 6 Hours.

Detailed in-depth study in a specific topic area. Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by student(s) and instructor prior to registration. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Graded F,R,P,W.

NURS 5698. THESIS. 6 Hours.

Graded F, R, P.

NURS 6170. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NURSING. 1 Hour.

Detailed in-depth study in a specific topic area. Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by student(s) and instructor prior to registration. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Graded F,R, P.

NURS 6190. SPECIAL TOPICS IN NURSING. 1 Hour.

Selected topics in advanced nursing. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

NURS 6270. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NURSING. 2 Hours.

Detailed in-depth study in a specific topic area. Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by student(s) and instructor prior to registration. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Graded F, R, P.

NURS 6290. TOPICS IN NURSING. 2 Hours.

Selected topics in advanced nursing. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

NURS 6301. THEORETICAL EVOLUTION IN SCIENCE. 3 Hours.

Philosophies of science and epistemologies, their influence on knowledge development for nursing practice, and strategies for theory development and analysis. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

NURS 6302. ISSUES IN STUDYING THE HEALTH OF CULTURALLY DIVERSE AND VULNERABLE POPULATIONS. 3 Hours.

Social and cultural factors affecting health among sub-populations defined by age, education, gender, ethnicity, culture, religion, occupation, vulnerability, income and geography. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. DNP or PhD program.

NURS 6303. CULTURE OF SCIENCE. 3 Hours.

Professional, ethical, legal, financial, and socio-political issues associated with the conduct and dissemination of research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

NURS 6304. MEASUREMENT IN CULTURALLY DIVERSE AND VULNERABLE POPULATIONS. 3 Hours.

Evaluate measurement tools/instruments for studying culturally diverse and vulnerable populations. Prerequisite: NURS 6301, Theoretical Evolution in Science, or permission of instructor. Course is predicated on prior learning related to concept analysis, basic statistics including correlation.

NURS 6305. QUALITATIVE RESEARCH. 3 Hours.

Philosophical foundation for and methodological issues in using qualitative approaches for scientific and knowledge development. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

NURS 6306. RESEARCH DESIGN. 3 Hours.

Application of advanced nursing research methods to design studies that improve health outcomes in culturally diverse populations. Prerequisites: NURS 6303 and NURS 6304 or permission of instructor.

NURS 6307. POPULATION HEALTH. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on analyzing determinants of health, then designing health strategies to improve outcomes of populations. Prerequisite: Doctoral Standing.

NURS 6308. RESEARCH SEMINAR. 3 Hours.

Application of criteria for appraising strengths and weaknesses of published studies; Synthesis of research literature on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

NURS 6310. RESEARCH PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT. 3 Hours.

Synthesis of elements of the research process with emphasis on research proposal development. Prerequisite: NURS 6308.

NURS 6318. PARAMETRIC STATISTICS FOR HEALTHCARE RESEARCH. 3 Hours.

Advanced knowledge and skills to use biostatistics effectively in different research designs and data analyses. Use of a statistical software package to manipulate datasets and perform statistical analyses. Emphasis will be placed on parametric statistical methods for complex research questions and designs. Prerequisite: Graduate-level introductory statistics course.

NURS 6319. PSYCHOMETRIC AND NONPARAMETRIC STATISTICS FOR HEALTHCARE RESEARCH. 3 Hours.

Basic knowledge and skills to select the appropriate biostatistical analysis for different research designs, analyze data, interpret statistical results, and understand research articles in professional journals. Emphasis will be placed on reliability and validity of instruments commonly used in healthcare; outcome measurement in health care; common research designs in health care research; nonparametric statistics for dependent samples and independent samples; logistic regression; and survival analysis. Prerequisite: Graduate-level introductory statistics course.

NURS 6320. LEADERSHIP IN HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the DNP nurse influencing health systems change at any level. Prerequisite: Doctoral Standing.

NURS 6321. EPIDEMIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Introduces the basic principles and biostatistical methods of epidemiology and demonstrates their applicability to population health. Prerequisite: Doctoral standing. PhD or DNP Program.

NURS 6322. TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH. 3 Hours.

This course provides a review of core research concepts as a foundation for evidence appraisal and translation. New practice-based clinical inquiry methods and strategies are explored to promote translation science for application in the DNP role. Prerequisite: NURS 6320.

NURS 6323. EVIDENCE APPRAISAL. 3 Hours.

In this course, students will use analytical methods to critically appraise existing research and literature to select and implement the best evidence for practice. Prerequisite: NURS 6322; NURS 6320.

NURS 6324. CLINICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the selection, assessment, and use of information systems, technology, and data to evaluate and monitor outcomes of care, care systems, and quality improvement. Prerequisite: NURS 6320 and NURS 6322.

NURS 6326. PROJECT PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT. 3 Hours.

The student designs an evidence-based process and intervention to improve practice. Prerequisite: NURS 6323. NURS 6322, NURS 6320.

NURS 6330. LARGE DATABASES. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to educate students on the theoretical framework behind the design, administration, and analysis of population-based health surveys. The focus is on datasets containing health and behavioral variables, but the skills learned are transferable to other areas of research as well. At the conclusion of this course students will be prepared to produce descriptive statistics about a population using data collected under complex survey design. With the collaboration of the instructor, this course culminates in the development, analysis, and reporting of a research conducted using a CDC database.

NURS 6331. DNP PRACTICUM PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

During this course, students implement and evaluate evidence-based solutions that influence health outcomes with clinical practice. Prerequisite: NURS 6307, NURS 6320, NURS 6321, NURS 6322, NURS 6323, NURS 6324, NURS 6326, NURS 6382. DNP status and good academic standing (GPA 3.0).

NURS 6333. DNP PRACTICUM PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

During this course, students implement and evaluate evidence-based solutions that influence health outcomes with clinical practice. Prerequisite: NURS 6307, NURS 6320, NURS 6621, NURS 6322, NURS 6323, NURS 6324, NURS 6326, NURS 6382 NURS 6620. Good academic standing (GPA 3.0).

NURS 6370. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NURSING. 3 Hours.

Detailed in-depth study in a specific topic area. Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by student(s) and instructor prior to registration. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Graded F, R, P.

NURS 6382. HEALTH CARE POLICY. 3 Hours.

Critique policies and processes to provide leadership in developing and implementing policies and/or regulations that influence institutional, local, state, federal, and/or international healthcare outcomes. Prerequisite: Doctoral Standing.

NURS 6390. TOPICS IN NURSING. 3 Hours.

Selected topics in advanced nursing. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

NURS 6399. DISSERTATION. 3 Hours.

Graded F, R. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the Doctor in Nursing degree.

NURS 6470. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NURSING. 4 Hours.

Detailed in-depth study in a specific topic area. Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by student(s) and instructor prior to registration. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Graded F, R, P.

NURS 6490. TOPICS IN NURSING. 4 Hours.

Selected topics in advanced nursing. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

NURS 6620. DNP PRACTICUM I. 6 Hours.

During this course, students implement evidence-based solutions that influence health outcomes. Prerequisite: NURS 6307, NURS 6320, NURS 6321, NURS 6322, NURS 6323, NURS 6324, NURS 6326, NURS 6382. Good academic standing (GPA 3.0).

NURS 6621. DNP PRACTICUM II. 6 Hours.

During this course, students evaluate evidence-based solutions that influence health outcomes. Prerequisite: NURS 6620 and DNP status, Good academic standing (3.0).

NURS 6699. DISSERTATION. 6 Hours.

Graded F, R, P, W. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the Doctor in Nursing degree.

NURS 6999. DISSERTATION. 9 Hours.

Graded F, R, P. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the Doctor in Nursing degree.

NURS 7399. DOCTORAL DEGREE COMPLETION. 3 Hours.

This course may be taken during the semester in which a student expects to complete all requirements for the doctoral degree and graduate. Enrolling in this course meets minimum enrollment requirements for graduation, for holding fellowships awarded by The Office of Graduate Studies and for full-time GTA or GRA positions. Students should verify that enrollment in this course meets other applicable enrollment requirements. To remain eligible in their final semester of study for grants, loans or other forms of financial aid administered by the Financial Aid Office must enroll in a minimum of 5 hours as required by the Office of Financial Aid. Other funding sources may also require more than 3-hours of enrollment. Additional hours may also be required to meet to requirements set by immigration law or by the policies of the student's degree program. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office, other sources of funding, Office of International Education and/or their graduate advisor to verify enrollment requirements before registering for this course. This course may only be taken once and may not be repeated. Students who do not complete all graduation requirements while enrolled in this course must enroll in a minimum of 6 dissertation hours (6699 or 6999) in their graduation term. Graded P/F/R.

Faculty

Anne R. Bavier
Dean & Professor

Mary (Beth) Mancini
Professor, Sr. Associate Dean; Chair, Undergraduate Nursing Program

Judy LeFlore
Professor, Associate Dean Graduate Nursing, Simulation and Technology

Marco Brotto
Professor, Director of PhD Program

Mark Haykowsky
Professor

Barry McKeown
Professor

Mark Ricard
Professor

Cheryl Anderson
Associate Professor

Donelle Barnes
Associate Professor

R. Matthew Brothers
Associate Professor

Maureen Courtney
Associate Professor

Kathryn Daniel
Associate Professor

David Keller
Associate Professor, Associate Dean Kinesiology

Larry Nelson
Associate Professor

Zui Pan
Associate Professor

Barbara Raudonis
Associate Professor

Mary Schira
Associate Professor

Cynthia Trowbridge
Associate Professor

Judy Wilson
Associate Professor

Joy Don Baker
Clinical Professor

Maxine Adegbola
Clinical Associate Professor

Deborah Behan
Clinical Associate Professor

Daisha Cipher
Clinical Associate Professor

Lauri John
Clinical Associate Professor, Associate Chair Department of Graduate Nursing PhD, Administration and Education

Patricia Thomas
Clinical Associate Professor

Margarita Trevino
Clinical Associate Professor

Luzita Isabel Vela
Clinical Associate Professor

Priscila Caçola
Assistant Professor

Michael Nelson
Assistant Professor

Cecilia Flores
Assistant Dean, Clinical Assistant Professor

Jeanean Boyd
Director of RN-BSN Programs, Clinical Assistant Professor

Gladys Maryol
Director of BSN Program, Clinical Assistant Professor

Dolores Aguilar
Clinical Assistant Professor; Director, MSN Nurse Educator Program

Patricia Allard
Clinical Assistant Professor

Tamara Andrews
Clinical Assistant Professor

Carrie Arena-Marshall
Clinical Assistant Professor

Donna Bacchus
Clinical Assistant Professor

Becky Baird
Clinical Assistant Professor

Sylvia Bates
Clinical Assistant Professor

Claire Bergmann
Clinical Assistant Professor

Nancy Bertram
Clinical Assistant Professor

Ann Birka
Clinical Assistant Professor

Shayla Buckler
Clinical Assistant Professor

Charlotte Carr
Clinical Assistant Professor

Essence Carter-Griffin
Clinical Assistant Professor, Associate Chair, Department of Graduate Nursing NP Programs

Denise Cauble
Clinical Assistant Professor

Donna Cleary
Clinical Assistant Professor

Cheryllane Colangan
Clinical Assistant Professor

Lynn Cope
Clinical Assistant Professor; Student Success Coordinator

Ted Cross
Clinical Assistant Professor

Rebecca Crow
Clinical Assistant Professor

Donna Davis
Clinical Assistant Professor

Meredith Decker
Clinical Assistant Professor

Thomas Dombrowsky
Clinical Assistant Professor

Sara Duvall
Clinical Assistant Professor

Tamara Eades
Clinical Assistant Professor

Sacha Edwards
Clinical Compliance Nurse

Griselle Estrada
Clinical Assistant Professor, Student Success Coordinator

Beverly Ewing
Clinical Assistant Professor

Brandi Farrell
Clinical Assistant Professor

Judith Flanagan
Clinical Assistant Professor

Linda Frye
Clinical Assistant Professor

Deana Furr
Clinical Assistant Professor

Ronda Fuselier
Clinical Assistant Professor

Cheryl Gainer
Clinical Assistant Professor

Tyler Garner
Clinical Assistant Professor

John Gonzalez
Clinical Assistant Professor, Director, Adult Gerontology Primary and Acute Care NP Programs

Linda Grande
Clinical Assistant Professor

Donna Hamby
Clinical Assistant Professor, Director, Doctor of Nursing Practice Program

Ahmad Hamdan
Clinical Assistant Professor

Marcia Harris
Clinical Assistant Professor

Mary Jane Haskew
Clinical Assistant Professor

Brad Heddins
Clinical Assistant Professor

Joni Heilskov
Clinical Assistant Professor

Janelle Hennes
Clinical Assistant Professor

Melynda Hutchings
Clinical Assistant Professor

Wadzanai Jadagu
Clinical Assistant Professor

Leslie Jennings
Clinical Assistant Professor

Courtney Johnson
Clinical Assistant Professor

Cindy Koomey
Clinical Assistant Professor

Yunsik Lee
Clinical Assistant Professor

Martha (Marti) Hesse
Clinical Assistant Professor

Laura Hixon
Clinical Assistant Professor

Brenda Hoolapa
Clinical Assistant Professor

Debra Hughes
Clinical Assistant Professor; Student Success Coordinator

Debra Hurd
Clinical Assistant Professor

Gretchen Hutchinson
Clinical Assistant Professor

Lynda Jarrell
Clinical Assistant Professor, Director, Family and Family Psychiatric NP Programs

Terri Jenkins
Clinical Assistant Professor

Sharon Johnson
Clinical Assistant Professor

Susan Justice
Clinical Assistant Professor

Paul Krawietz
Clinical Assistant Professor

Melissa Lagrone
Clinical Assistant Professor

Sandra Laird
Clinical Assistant Professor

Connie Lowry
Clinical Assistant Professor

Catherine Lux
Clinical Assistant Professor

Amy Madsen
Clinical Assistant Professor

Janet Makori
Clinical Assistant Professor

Amy Marshall
Clinical Assistant Professor

Linda (Jan) Marshall
Clinical Assistant Professor

Rebecca Mathews
Clinical Assistant Professor

Bethany McClean
Clinical Assistant Professor

Janet McLean
Clinical Assistant Professor

Jacqueline Michael
Clinical Assistant Professor

Marcia Monghate
Clinical Assistant Professor

Kelley Monroe
Clinical Assistant Professor

Sara Moore
Clinical Assistant Professor

Brian Morr
Clinical Assistant Professor

Juanita Nickols
Clinical Assistant Professor

Saeed Niyati
Clinical Assistant Professor

Susan Norman
Clinical Assistant Professor

Adejoke (Felicia) Ogidan
Clinical Assistant Professor

Roselyn Otieno
Clinical Assistant Professor

Patti Parker
Clinical Assistant Professor

Cynthia Plonien
Clinical Assistant Professor; Director, MSN Nursing Administration Program

Patricia Plumer
Director of BSN Programs; Clinical Assistant Professor

Kristen Priddy
Clinical Assistant Professor

Mary Beth Reid
Clinical Assistant Professor

Brandon Respress
Clinical Assistant Professor

Charisse Rivers
Clinical Assistant Professor

Jeffrey Robbins
Clinical Assistant Professor

Christine Roberts
Clinical Assistant Professor

Meagan Rogers
Clinical Assistant Professor

Jennifer Roye
Clinical Assistant Professor; Program Mgt of UG Clinical Facilites Coordination & Asst Director of Technology and Curriculum Integration

Deborah Sanford-Wilson
Clinical Assistant Professor

Shari Scott
Clinical Assistant Professor

D'Ann Shidler
Clinical Assistant Professor, Student Success Coordinator

Jason Smith
Clinical Assistant Professor

David Smith
Clinical Assistant Professor

Heather Snell
Clinical Assistant Professor, Director, Pediatric Primary, Acute Care and Neonatal Programs

Janet Stagg
Clinical Assistant Professor

Elisa Stehling
Clinical Assistant Professor

Janeth Stiller
Clinical Assistant Professor

Diane St. Pierre
Clinical Assistant Professor

Quainshonda (Rena) Suber
Clinical Assistant Professor

Gigi Thomas
Clinical Assistant Professor

Shawn Tindell
Clinical Assistant Professor & Clinical Coordinator BSN

Jorjanna Toon
Clinical Assistant Professor

Angela Trejo
Clinical Assistant Professor

Dipa Trivedi
Clinical Assistant Professor

Linda Trowbridge
Clinical Assistant Professor

Regina Urban
Clinical Assistant Professor

Shiny Varghese
Clinical Assistant Professor

Mary Ellen Viancourt
Clinical Assistant Professor

Sara Washington
Clinical Assistant Professor

Alison White
Clinical Assistant Professor

Pamela White
Clinical Assistant Professor & Program Manager Accelerated Online BSN

Glen Wood
Clinical Assistant Professor

Phyllis Wood
Clinical Assistant Professor

Kimberly Wright
Clinical Assistant Professor

Nancy Wyrick
Clinical Assistant Professor

Abu Yilla
Clinical Assistant Professor

Wasileh Petro-Nustas
Visiting Professor

Rebecca Garner
Visiting Assistant Professor

Mary Lou Bond
Professor Emerita

Soohyun Kim
Simulation Manager of Academic Programs

Kamal Sandhu
Simulation Facilitator

Natalia Albright
Clinical Instructor

Jennifer Dailey
Clinical Instructor

JaNeatris Foy
Clinical Instructor

Kari Guffey
Clinical Instructor

Erika Lynch
Clinical Instructor

Sayda Major
Clinical Instructor

Shirley Martin
Clinical Instructor

Lindy Moake
Clinical Instructor

Karen Noesges
Clinical Instructor

Tammie Peterson
Clinical Instructor

Ali Su
Clinical Instructor