Kinesiology

Courses

KINE 1230. FIRST AID / CPR / AED TRAINING. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to cover the components of Standard First Aid, Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) for the Professional Rescuer, and Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training. Certification is possible upon successful course completion. Offered as HEED 1230 and KINE 1230. Students seeking credit in HEED should enroll in HEED 1230 and students seeking credit in KINE should enroll in KINE 1230. Credit will not be granted for both courses.

KINE 1315. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to, and observation of, practices in pedagogical kinesiology and sports leadership.

KINE 1400. INTRODUCTION TO EXERCISE SCIENCE. 4 Hours.

Introduction to key concepts concerning the anatomical, biomechanical, and physiological basis of exercise science. Through lecture and laboratory experiences, the student is introduced to cardiovascular responses to training, analysis of human movement, and basic principles of exercise prescription. Credit cannot be given for both KINE 1400 and the combination of courses it replaces: KINE 1124 and KINE 1314.

KINE 2130. ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL PRACTICUM I. 1 Hour.

Laboratory and clinical experiences designed to provide students with formal instruction and evaluation in the Entry Level Athletic Training Clinical Proficiencies with an instructional emphasis on preventive and protective taping and wrapping procedures. This course requires the completion of 120 clinical hours under the supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) or Clinical Instructor (CI).

KINE 2230. INTRODUCTION TO MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURIES. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to the mechanisms of musculoskeletal injury and their associated signs, symptoms, and tissue responses. Students will also be introduced to the basic principles of musculoskeletal assessment. This course is a prerequisite for admission to the Athletic Training Education Program. Prerequisite: KINE 2120, KINE 2320; must be concurrently enrolled in KINE 2130.

KINE 2301. TEACHING GAMES FOR UNDERSTANDING. 3 Hours.

The course will provide students with theoretical concepts with which they can design and analyze various short- and long-term plans related to the Teaching Games for Understanding theoretical model. Students will learn various tactical strategies and modification principles for applying learned concepts in instructional settings. The instructor will use expertise from given sports to help students transfer the common themes across the spectrum of the model's category of games. KINE 1315 is a co-requisite for this course. Prerequisite: Co-requisite KINE 1315.

KINE 2302. DANCE AND MOVEMENT ACTIVITIES. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to enhance the students performance knowledge of skills and strategies in dance and movement activities to acquaint them with effective teaching behaviors appropriate for these activities. Co-requisite KINE 1315. Prerequisite: Co-requisite KINE 1315.

KINE 2307. SPORTS AND SOCIETY. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the bidirectional impact of sport and societal institutions. The class will explore the co-dependent nature of sport and society and attempt to separate fact from fiction to aid in the understanding of the true role of sport as it fits into society. Topics to be addressed include the potentially controversial areas of race, gender, disability, institutional rule violations, and ethics in the contemporary sports arena. This is a lower level elective. Credit cannot be received for this course and KINE 3307.

KINE 2330. CARE AND PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the profession of Athletic Training. Common sports-related injuries and illnesses will be discussed with an emphasis on the proper methods for prevention, recognition, and immediate care. Offered as HEED 2330 and KINE 2330. Kinesiology majors must take KINE 2330.

KINE 2350. PUBLIC HEALTH: PRINCIPLES AND POPULATIONS. 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with an overview of Public Health: what it is, how it works, and why it is important. Topics include current health issues, global health, health disparities and how Public Health impacts community settings. Class requirement includes participation in community-based, experiential-learning activities. Examination of public health concepts, values and functions. Exploration of the underlying science of human health and disease as that is impacted by socioeconomic, behavioral, biological, environmental and other factors that impact human health and contribute to health disparities.

KINE 2420. INTRODUCTION TO ATHLETIC TRAINING. 4 Hours.

Classroom and laboratory experiences that provide an introduction to the profession of Athletic Training with an emphasis on prevention and immediate care of sports related injuries. Specific topics will include injury prevention techniques; emergency first aid and acute care; superficial application of therapeutic modalities; proper use and fitting of protective equipment; and environmental considerations. Credit cannot be given for KINE 2420 and the combination of courses it replaces: KINE 2320 and KINE 2120.

KINE 3130. ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL PRACTICUM II. 1 Hour.

Laboratory and clinical experiences designed to provide students with formal instruction and evaluation in the Entry Level Athletic Training Competencies and Clinical Proficiencies. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical experience performed under the supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) or Clinical Instructor (CI). Prerequisites: BIOL 2457, Athletic Training Majors only or permission of instructor. Corequisite: KINE 3320.

KINE 3131. ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL PRACTICUM III. 1 Hour.

Laboratory and clinical experiences that provide students with formal instruction and evaluation in the Entry Level Athletic Training Competencies and Clinical Proficiencies. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical education experience performed under the supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) or Clinical Instructor (CI). Prerequisite: BIOL 2457, Athletic Training Majors only or permission of instructor. Corequisite: KINE 3324.

KINE 3300. FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY. 3 Hours.

A study of the musculoskeletal anatomy to include bony landmarks, muscle origin, insertion and action, as well as nerve innervation. Knowledge of the functional anatomy is crucial to the understanding of sports performance, the design of strength training programs, and injury prevention. Prerequisite: BIOL 2457 and KINE 1400.

KINE 3301. BIOMECHANICS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT. 3 Hours.

Quantitative and qualitative analyses of human movement. Emphasis is on the application of the principles of human movement, with consideration of functional anatomy, kinesiology and mechanical concepts to exercise, sport, and activities of daily living. Prerequisite: KINE 1400, BIOL 2457 and MATH 1302, or permission of instructor.

KINE 3302. SPORT AND EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Analysis of exercise and sport activities in terms of psychological skills and strategies. Topics include motivation, arousal regulation, focus, concentration, group cohesion & imagery.

KINE 3303. ORGANIZATIONAL PRINCIPLES OF EXERCISE AND SPORT ACTIVITIES. 3 Hours.

An organizational analysis of exercise and sport in terms of participation rules, regulations, and responsibilities. Emphasis on knowledge and understanding of the principles governing the organization and conduct of exercise and sport activities.

KINE 3304. ADAPTED PHYSICAL EXERCISE & SPORT. 3 Hours.

Analysis of conditions that impact individuals with special needs. Emphasis on adapted physical education strategies that facilitate the learning of this population. Prior to registration, the student must complete and submit an AISD criminal background check form to the Department of Kinesiology. The form is available in the Department of Kinesiology or can be downloaded from the departmental web site. KINE 3388 is a co-requisite for this course. Prerequisite: KINE 1315 and KINE 1400. Co-requisite KINE 3388.

KINE 3306. MOTOR INTEGRATION. 3 Hours.

Principles of motor skill acquisition, performance, and control. Topics include practice strategies, memory, neuromotor functioning, attention, and learning (assessment, transfer & stages). Prerequisite: KINE 1315, and KINE 1400, or permission of instructor.

KINE 3307. SPORT AND SOCIETY: ISSUES AND DEBATES. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the bidirectional impact of sport and societal institutions. The class will explore the co-dependent nature of sport and society and attempt to separate fact from fiction to aid in the understanding of the true role of sport as it fits into society. Topics to be addressed include the potentially controversial areas of race, gender, disability, institutional rule violations, and ethics in the contemporary sports arena. This is an upper level elective. Credit cannot be received for this course and KINE 2307.

KINE 3309. FOUNDATIONS OF RECREATION. 3 Hours.

Leisure time in our social structure and the agencies which have developed to provide leisure time activities. Program development and leadership skills in the recreation profession.

KINE 3311. RECREATION AND LEISURE SERVICE. 3 Hours.

Application of management and organizational principles, objectives, and procedures involved in implementing recreational and leisure service programs.

KINE 3312. COACHING INVASION GAME PRINCIPLES. 3 Hours.

The course will provide students with theoretical concepts with which they can design and analyze various short and long-term plans related to invasion games. Students will learn various tactical strategies and modification principles for applying learned concepts in instructional settings. The instructor will use expertise from given sports to help students transfer the common themes across the spectrum of invasion games.

KINE 3313. COACHING OF NET/WALL GAME PRINCIPLES. 3 Hours.

The course will provide students with theoretical concepts with which they can design and analyze various short and long-term plans related to net/wall games. Students will learn various tactical strategies and modification principles for applying learned concepts in instructional settings. The instructor will use expertise from given sports to help students transfer the common themes across the spectrum of net/wall games.

KINE 3315. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

Provides the physiology background necessary for an understanding of the acute and chronic effects of exercise on the body. Physiological concepts and their relationship to exercise, sport, and health programs are examined. Laboratory experiences are designed for evaluating physiological responses to exercise. Prerequisite: KINE 1400, BIOL 2457, BIOL 2458, MATH 1302.

KINE 3320. LOWER EXTREMITY EVALUATION. 3 Hours.

A study of the common orthopedic and musculoskeletal injuries involving the lower extremities and lumbar spine, with a special emphasis on recognition, evaluation, diagnosis, and initial management. Prerequisite: BIOL 2457, Athletic Training Majors only or permission of instructor. Corequisite: KINE 3130.

KINE 3324. UPPER EXTREMITY EVALUATION. 3 Hours.

A study of the common orthopedic and musculoskeletal injuries involving the upper extremities, spine, head, face, abdomen, and thorax, with a special emphasis on recognition, evaluation, diagnosis, and initial management. Prerequisite: BIOL 2457, Athletic Training Majors only or permission of instructor. Corequisite: KINE 3131.

KINE 3325. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH METHODS. 3 Hours.

Current practices in the conduct of quantitative research, measurement, and evaluation processes applied to programs related to exercise science, pedagogical kinesiology, athletic training and related fields will be examined. Enrolled students will develop and conduct a research project based on their declared discipline. Prerequisite: KINE 1400, MATH 1302, MATH 1308.

KINE 3330. PATHOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Study of acute and chronic illness and their response to, and impact on, physical activity. Discussion of pharmacological agents used in the care of general illnesses and musculoskeletal disorders in the physically active. Prerequisite: BIOL 2458, acceptance into the Athletic Training Education Program or permission of instructor.

KINE 3333. THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTION II. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of upper extremity and low back rehabilitation protocols and the use of electric therapeutic modalities like ultrasound, diathermy, laser, and electric stimulation. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the disablement model and learning how to plan, implement, document, and evaluate programs for the rehabilitation and reconditioning of injuries and illnesses of athletes and others involved with physical activity. Operation of electrical therapeutic modalities and how they can be incorporated into a rehabilitation program will be investigated. The underlying principles and application techniques for each modality, therapeutic exercise progressions, patient clinical goals, legal and safe practice guidelines, and evidence based therapeutic modality science will allow for critical thinking and problem solving in relation to common upper extremity and low back injuries. Both surgical and non-surgical rehabilitation models for the upper extremity and low back will be discussed with a special emphasis on the use of functional progressions. Prerequisites: BIOL 2457 and BIOL 2458. Concurrent enrollment in KINE 4131 is required for all Athletic Training Education Program students.

KINE 3342. SOCIOLOGY OF THE HUMAN BODY. 3 Hours.

Drawing from the social sciences, cultural and gender studies, and exercise physiology, this course in body sociology addresses several comtemporary issues relating to diet, nutrition and exercise. Specific topics include eating disorders, factory farming, and "body industries" involving weight-loss diets, gyms, fashion, and cosmetic and bariatric surgery. The medical model of bodies is also examined. Also listed as SOCI 3342; credit will not be granted for both KINE 3342 and SOCI 3342.

KINE 3350. URBANIZATION AND VULNERABLE POPULATIONS. 3 Hours.

Investigation of diversity of individuals and populations in a community, including how diversity may influence policies, programs, services, and the health of a community, and the importance for a diverse public health workforce.

KINE 3351. PUBLIC HEALTH INFORMATICS. 3 Hours.

Explain and apply ethical principles that apply to the use of information technology as those pertain to accessing, collecting, analyzing, using, maintaining, and disseminating data and information.

KINE 3352. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH EPIDEMIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Analysis of factors that affect the health of a community, including how disease spreads, legal aspects of epidemics, and how data is used to drive public health decision making. Overview of how public health practice and science come together to protect the health of the public, or of a specific population. Prerequisite: MATH 1301 or MATH 1302 required. MATH 1308 recommended.

KINE 3353. HEALTH AND THE HUMAN CONDITION IN THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY. 3 Hours.

Study of the history, philosophy and contemporary issues of public health as those apply to public health in both urban and global societies.

KINE 3354. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS & MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Inquiry into the structures, functions, and authorizations of governmental public health programs. Identification of tools, processes, and activities related to both practice and policy used to support community responses to public health emergencies and other disasters. Prerequisite: KINE 1400, Co-requisite KINE 2350.

KINE 3388. THEORY AND APPLICATION IN MOTOR DEVELOPMENT. 3 Hours.

A study of motor skill development from infancy to adolescence with emphasis upon motor development theory and aspects that effect motor competence, underlie movement control, and influence change in the acquisition of motor skills. Prior to registration, the student must complete and submit an AISD criminal background check to the Department of Kinesiology. The form is available in the Department of Kinesiology or can be downloaded from the departmental Web site. Prerequisite: KINE 1315 and KINE 1400.

KINE 4130. ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL PRACTICUM IV. 1 Hour.

Laboratory and clinical experiences designed to provide students with formal instruction and evaluation in the Entry Level Athletic Training Competencies and Clinical Proficiencies. The instructional emphasis is the development of functional rehabilitation programs for musculoskeletal injuries and common orthopedic surgeries. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical experience performed under the supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) or Clinical Instructor (CI). Prerequisite: BIOL 2457 and BIOL 2458; Athletic Training Majors only or permission of instructor. Corequisite: KINE 4336.

KINE 4131. ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL PRACTICUM V. 1 Hour.

Laboratory and clinical experiences designed to provide students with formal instruction and evaluation in the Entry Level Athletic Training Competencies and Clinical Proficiencies. Instructional emphasis is on the selection and clinical application of therapeutic modalities. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical experience performed under the supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) or Clinical Instructor (CI). Prerequisite: BIOL 2457 and BIOL 2458; Athletic Training Majors only or permission of instructor. Corequisite: KINE 3333.

KINE 4132. ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL PRACTICUM VI. 1 Hour.

Laboratory and clinical experiences designed to provide students with formal instruction and evaluation in the Entry Level Athletic Training Competencies and Clinical Proficiencies. This course requires the completion of 200 hours of clinical experience performed under the supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor. Prerequisite: KINE 3130, KINE 3131, KINE 3320, KINE 3324, KINE 3330, KINE 3333, KINE 4130, KINE 4131, KINE 4336, and acceptance into the Athletic Training Education Program or approval of instructor. Must be concurrently enrolled in KINE 4233.

KINE 4188. CLINICAL HEALTH PROFESSIONS INTERNSHIP. 1 Hour.

Individualized academic training in an external clinical health professions setting (e.g. hospital, physical therapy clinic, or physician's office) under the direct supervision of a health care professional (MD, PT, OT, PA) Prerequisites: KINE 4315, current CPR certification, proof of sufficient professional liability insurance, and permission of department.

KINE 4191. CONFERENCE COURSE. 1 Hour.

Topics assigned on an individual basis covering personal research or study in the designated area. Prerequisite: permission of department chairperson.

KINE 4193. PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER CERTIFICATION PRACTICUM. 1 Hour.

In this course students will be prepared for the TExES PE-EC-12 and PPR- EC-12 exams and prepared for the professional dispositions associated with being a Physical Educator with an emphasis on ethics, interviewing, and role modeling. The students will take and review the PE Content and Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities practice teaching licensure exams. Through this process teacher candidates will be cleared for official TExES registration. This course is to be taken the semester immediately prior to the student teaching semester.

KINE 4201. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES AND TACTICS OF BASEBALL. 2 Hours.

Development and analysis of skills, offensive and defensive strategies used in the sport of baseball.

KINE 4202. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES AND TACTICS OF BASKETBALL. 2 Hours.

Development and analysis of skills, offensive/defensive strategies used in the sport of basketball.

KINE 4203. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES AND TACTICS OF FOOTBALL. 2 Hours.

Development and analysis of skills, offensive and defensive strategies used in the sport of football.

KINE 4204. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES AND TACTICS OF TRACK AND FIELD. 2 Hours.

Development and analysis of track and field event techniques and strategies.

KINE 4205. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES AND TACTICS OF VOLLEYBALL. 2 Hours.

Development and analysis of skills, offensive and defensive strategies used in the sport of volleyball.

KINE 4233. ATHLETIC TRAINING ORGANIZATION & ADMINISTRATION. 2 Hours.

A study of the administrative issues and management theories that may be encountered in athletic training. Special emphasis is placed on the practical application of concepts related to legal liability, facility design and maintenance, documentation, financial management, health insurance, and general day-to-day operations. Prerequisite: KINE 3130, KINE 3131, KINE 3320, KINE 3324, KINE 3330, KINE 3333, KINE 4130, KINE 4131, KINE 4336, and acceptance into the Athletic Training Education Program or approval of instructor.

KINE 4291. CONFERENCE COURSE. 2 Hours.

Topics assigned on an individual basis covering personal research or study in the designated area. Prerequisite: permission of department chairperson.

KINE 4293. SEMINAR IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. 2 Hours.

Synthesis of theories and concepts in athletic training. Review of the competencies and proficiencies in athletic training with special emphasis on professional development and the refinement of clinical decision-making. Prerequisite: KINE 3320, KINE 3324, KINE 3330, KINE 3333, KINE 4233, KINE 4336; Athletic Training Majors only.

KINE 4296. SPECIAL TOPICS IN EXERCISE AND SPORT. 2 Hours.

Designed to meet the current needs of students. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

KINE 4315. FITNESS ASSESSMENT/PROGRAMMING. 3 Hours.

Classroom and laboratory experiences provide the student with an opportunity to become familiar with the assessment of physical fitness including graded exercise testing, metabolic studies, basic ECG interpretation, and body composition. The student will also learn risk factor identification and exercise prescription. Prerequisite: KINE 3315, KINE 3325, and MATH 1302.

KINE 4316. FITNESS PROGRAMMING. 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with practical and theoretical applications of fitness programming. The successful student will acquire a level of proficiency in the development of fitness programs and plans based upon client specific fitness assessment characteristics. Fitness programs shall include, but not be limited to: musculoskeletal symmetry, strength, and flexibility; body composition; cardiovascular endurance, and nutritional recommendations. Additionally, successful students will become proficient in the application of client related historical, nutritional, medical, psychological, and psychosocial factors that impact the development of a properly designed exercise program. Prerequisite: Current CPR certification, MATH 1302, KINE 3300, KINE 3315, and KINE 4315, or permission of instructor.

KINE 4317. EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS. 3 Hours.

This course will discuss the pathophysiology of prevalent cardiovascular, metabolic and pulmonary diseases. Methods of exercise prescription and issues of concern will also be presented for these populations, as well as, low back pain, pregnancy, osteoporosis, cancer, anorexia and bulimia, children, adolescents, teens, older adults, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Practical application of leadership skills and hands-on instruction will be addressed in the laboratory portion of this course. Prerequisite: MATH 1302, KINE 3300, and KINE 3315.

KINE 4319. FITNESS AND OUTDOOR ADVENTURE ACTIVITIES EDUCATION. 3 Hours.

The course will provide students with theoretical health-related concepts with which they can design and apply fitness learning into various physical education settings. In addition, this course is designed to introduce students to outdoor and adventure education activities and adventure-based learning. Time will be spent on low element group initiatives and high element adventure activities. Prerequisite: KINE 2301 and KINE 2302.

KINE 4320. TEACHING SECONDARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 3 Hours.

Designed to enhance teacher candidates' understanding of curriculum development as it applies to theory of motor learning and the sciences of kinesiology. These progressions are synthesized into a collaborative service-learning project with secondary public school partner(s). Candidates take responsibility for creating, coordinating, and facilitating learning experiences that are developmentally appropriate, motivating, and based on research.

KINE 4321. TEACHING ELEM PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to synthesize the sciences of anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, motor integration and motor control with sound pedagogical knowledge into an applied elementary physical education setting. Criminal background check required. Prerequisite: KINE 3304 and KINE 3388.

KINE 4323. MOTOR CONTROL AND LEARNING. 3 Hours.

This course will expose students to the theoretical perspectives and current principles associated with the control and learning of movement skills. Specifically, the neural and mechanical mechanisms underlying motor behavior and the variables influencing motor learning will be addressed. Throughout the course, application of theoretical concepts to instructional and clinical settings will be emphasized. Prerequisite: KINE 3325.

KINE 4329. STRENGTH & CONDITIONING IN SPORT AND PERFORMANCE. 3 Hours.

This course covers the physiology and biomechanics of strength training and conditioning. Additional topics include: testing and evaluation of athletes, resistance training techniques, training program design, and organization administration of a strength training facility. This course is designed to prepare students to take the CSCS, Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, certification examination. Prerequisite: KINE 3300, KINE 3315, KINE 3325.

KINE 4330. PROGRAM DESIGN & ADMINISTRATION. 3 Hours.

The development and operation of health/wellness programs and facilities will be presented, including: program design and administration, facility design, organizational development, management theory, marketing, financial management, legal issues, strategic planning, and evaluation models. The student will participate in all phases of program and facility development, such as budget development, recruiting and retaining employees and clients, market niche, and conflict resolution. Prerequisite: KINE 3315 and KINE 3325.

KINE 4331. OBESITY & WEIGHT MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

This course is a review of the scientific literature on the causes and consequences of obesity. Topics include techniques for assessing body composition, factors promoting fat metabolism and deposition, traditional and non-traditional weight-loss programs, and adherence to weight-loss programs. Credit may not be given for both KINE 4317 AND KINE 4331. Prerequisites: KINE 3315 and KINE 3325.

KINE 4335. GRADED EXERCISE TESTING & PRESCRIPTION. 3 Hours.

The knowledge and skills necessary for assessment of health history and appraisal, blood pressure, electrocardiogram, cardiovascular fitness and function will be acquired in lecture and laboratory sessions. Various test modalities and protocols will be discussed for health and diseased populations. Prerequisite: BIOL 2457, BIOL 2458, and KINE 3315, KINE 4315, or permission of instructor.

KINE 4336. THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTION I. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the scientific theory and the basic principles of musculoskeletal rehabilitation and therapeutic modalities. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the disablement model and learning how to plan, implement, document, and evaluate programs for the rehabilitation and reconditioning of injuries and illnesses of athletes and others involved with physical activity. Operation of superficial heating and cooling therapeutic modalities and how manual treatments (e.g., traction, muscle energy and massage) can be incorporated into a rehabilitation program will be investigated. The underlying principles and application techniques for each modality, therapeutic exercise progressions, patient clinical goals, legal and safe practice guidelines, and evidence based therapeutic modality science will allow for critical thinking and problem solving in relation to common lower extremity injuries. Both surgical and non-surgical rehabilitation models for the lower extremity will be discussed with a special emphasis on the use of functional progressions. Prerequisites: BIOL 2457 and BIOL 2458. Concurrent enrollment in KINE 4130 is required for all Athletic Training Education Program students.

KINE 4337. STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING IN GENERAL POPULATIONS: HEALTH AND DISEASE. 3 Hours.

This course covers the physiology and biomechanics of strength training and conditioning as it applies to the general populations across the spectrum of health and disease. This includes: testing, evaluation, resistance training techniques and training program design for individuals with orthopedic injuries and rehabilitation concerns, metabolic conditions (e.g., diabetes), youth, elderly, and pregnant or post-prenatal women. This course is designed to prepare students to take the NSCA-CPT, and apply the skills needed to be a leader within the personal training and physical therapy career paths. Prerequisite: KINE 3300, KINE 3315, and KINE 3325.

KINE 4350. SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY. 3 Hours.

The course will provide an overview of the growing field of Sports Psychology, which involves applying psychological science to sports. Topics such as maximizing sports performance, elite performance and personality, motivation techniques in sports, leadership skills in sports, etc., will be covered.

KINE 4351. ETHICAL PRACTICES IN HEALTH PROFESSIONS. 3 Hours.

Study of ethical standards and how those are incorporated into practice and decision-making that relate to interactions with individuals, organizations, and communities. Exploration of strategies for public health, health care, and other allied healthcare organizations to work together or individually to impact the health of a community. Prerequisite: KINE 1400, KINE 2350 or instructor's permission.

KINE 4352. PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES AND METHODS. 3 Hours.

Identify scientific concepts and research methods of population health, along with the basic processes, approaches, and interventions that identify and address the major health-related needs and concerns of populations. Analysis of project implementation such as planning, assessment and evaluation. Prerequisite: Junior status, KINE 2350 or instructor permission.

KINE 4353. PUBLIC HEALTH CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE. 3 Hours.

Individualized practice-based public health work experience in a professional public health-related setting (e.g., public health agency, nonprofit organization, legislative representative office, hospital) under the direct supervision of a public health professional. To be taken during the final two semesters prior to graduation. Prerequisite: KINE 2350, KINE 3350, KINE 3351, KINE 3352, KINE 3353, KINE 3354, KINE 4355, KINE 4352.

KINE 4354. PUBLIC HEALTH ADVOCACY AND LEADERSHIP. 3 Hours.

Appraisal of leadership philosophies and actions that reflect and model effective strategies for protecting and promoting the public's health.

KINE 4355. COMMUNICATION FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS. 3 Hours.

Information and experiences that identify the health literacy of populations, including addressment of barriers and unique situations for vulnerable populations. Communication of information through appropriate, culturally competent methodologies. Integration of basic concepts of public health-specific communication into technical and professional writing. The use of mass media and electronic technology. Prerequisite: KINE 2350, KINE 3350, KINE 3351.

KINE 4387. EXERCISE SCIENCE PRACTICUM. 3 Hours.

Academic training within the internal setting of U.T. Arlington's exercise science laboratories. Each student will receive 135 hours of professional practicum experience in a variety of exercise science settings including wellness, physical fitness activity classes, physical fitness theory classes, the physical fitness center, and/or other exercise science settings. Prerequisite: Current CPR certification, KINE 4315, KINE 4316, and permission of instructor.

KINE 4388. EXERCISE SCIENCE INTERNSHIP. 3 Hours.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise science setting (e.g., hospital, physical therapy, university laboratory) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional. Prerequisite: KINE 4315, current CPR certification, and proof of sufficient professional liability insurance.

KINE 4389. FITNESS MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP. 3 Hours.

Designed on an individual basis to allow the student to apply academic training in a professional fitness center under the direct supervision of a fitness specialist. Prerequisite: Current CPR certification, KINE 4315 and proof of sufficient professional liability insurance.

KINE 4390. PRACTICUM IN SPORT PERFORMANCE. 3 Hours.

Designed on an individual basis as a field experience in the observation of sport performance, and the application of performance principles to sport participation. Students must make application for enrollment prior to October 1 for Spring Semester and prior to April 1 for Fall Semester.

KINE 4391. CONFERENCE COURSE. 3 Hours.

Topics assigned on an individual basis covering personal research or study in the designated area. Prerequisite: permission of department chairperson.

KINE 4394. HONORS THESIS/SENIOR PROJECT. 3 Hours.

Required of all students in the University Honors College. During the senior year, the student must complete a thesis or a project under the direction of a faculty member in the major department.

KINE 4395. INDIVIDUAL STUDY IN EXERCISE AND SPORT. 3 Hours.

The completion of an existing course on an individual basis as contracted with an approved faculty member. This procedure is limited to emergency situations, and must be identified through the departmental advising process.

KINE 4396. SPECIAL TOPICS IN EXERCISE AND SPORT. 3 Hours.

Designed to meet the current needs of students. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

KINE 4400. APPLIED EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY. 4 Hours.

Application of physiological principles of training of physical fitness and sport; examination of factors influencing anaerobic and aerobic training methods and their effect on fitness. Physiological responses studied include cardiovascular, neuromuscular, bioenergetics, and extreme environments. Site visits, laboratory experiences and a research project enhance the student's understanding of physiological changes and career paths in exercise science. Prerequisite: Current CPR certification, KINE 3315, KINE 3325, KINE 4315, MATH 1302 and MATH 1308.

KINE 4490. EXERCISE SCIENCE INTERNSHIP. 4 Hours.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise science setting (e.g., hospital, physical therapy, cardiac rehabilitation, fitness center) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional or licensed therapist. Corequisite: KINE 4315 and proof of sufficient professional liability insurance.

KINE 4589. EXERCISE SCIENCE INTERNSHIP. 5 Hours.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise science setting (e.g., hospital, physical therapy, cardiac rehabilitation, fitness center) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional or licensed therapist. Co-requisite: KINE 4315, and proof of sufficient professional liability insurance.

KINE 4647. ALL-LEVEL TEACHER PREPARATION STUDENT TEACHING FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 6 Hours.

This supervised course is designed as a culminating field experience of pre-service professional preparation giving an opportunity to practically apply theoretical and pedagogical knowledge in real school settings. Applied experience will be attained in both Elementary and Secondary settings. Criminal background check required. Prerequisite: KINE 1315, KINE 2301, KINE 3304, KINE 3306, KINE 3325, KINE 3388, KINE 4193, KINE 4319, KINE 4320, KINE 4321, LIST 4343, and EDML 4300.

KINE 4653. PUBLIC HEALTH EXTENDED CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE. 6 Hours.

Individualized practice-based public health work experience in a professional public health-related setting (e.g., public health agency, nonprofit organization, legislative representative office, hospital) under the direct supervision of a public health professional. To be taken during the final two semesters prior to graduation. Prerequisite: KINE 2350, KINE 3350, KINE 3351, KINE 3352, KINE 3353, KINE 3354, KINE 4355, KINE 4352.

KINE 4689. FITNESS MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP. 6 Hours.

Designed on an individual basis to allow the student to apply academic training in a professional fitness center under the direct supervision of a fitness specialist. Prerequisite: Current CPR certification, KINE 4315, KINE 4316, KINE 4387 (or concurrent enrollment), proof of sufficient professionally liability insurance, and permission of instructor.

KINE 4988. EXERCISE SCIENCE INTERNSHIP. 9 Hours.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise science setting (e.g., hospital, physical therapy, university laboratory) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional. Prerequisite: KINE 4315, KINE 4316, KINE 4387 (or concurrent enrollment), current CPR certification, proof of sufficient professional liability insurance, and permission of instructor.

KINE 4989. FITNESS MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP. 9 Hours.

Designed on an individual basis to allow the student to apply academic training in a professional fitness center under the direct supervision of a fitness specialist. Prerequisite: Current CPR certification, KINE 4315, KINE 4316, KINE 4387 (or concurrent enrollment), proof of sufficient professionally liability insurance, and permission of instructor.

KINE 5120. ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL I. 1 Hour.

Clinical experiences performed in an athletic training setting or other health care facility under the supervision of a program approved health care provider.

KINE 5125. IMMUNOLOGY. 1 Hour.

This course will include a brief review of the immune system and factors that affect immune function with emphasis on the effect of exercise and stress on muscle and overall immune function. The effect of nutrition and over-training on the immune system and associated syndromes/diseases will also be presented.

KINE 5130. Clinical Athletic Training II. 1 Hour.

Clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisites: KINE 5420, KINE 5220, KINE 5120.

KINE 5140. Clinical Athletic Training III. 1 Hour.

Clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5130.

KINE 5150. Clinical Athletic Training IV. 1 Hour.

Clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5140.

KINE 5160. Clinical Athletic Training V. 1 Hour.

Clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 250 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5150.

KINE 5170. JOURNAL CLUB IN PHYSIOLOGY. 1 Hour.

This course is designed to provide the students an opportunity to learn the art of critically reading and interpreting research articles. There will be emphasis on identifying strengths and weakness of research studies. There will also be an opportunity for the students to present their research study ideas and / or their preliminary findings of their research to the class. This will provide an opportunity for students to interact and receive / provide feedback regarding methodological approaches and interpretation of findings. Lastly, the student will learn how to prepare and deliver presentations to an audience.

KINE 5190. SPECIAL TOPICS IN KINESIOLOGY. 1 Hour.

In-depth study of selected topics in physical education and exercise science. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

KINE 5191. INTERNSHIP IN CARDIOPULMONARY REHABILITATION. 1 Hour.

The student will complete 400 internship hours in an approved Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation setting. The student may take two semesters of KINE 5191 at 200 hours each. The student will be involved in patient/client assessment, training, rehabilitation, risk factor identification and lifestyle management services provided for individuals with or at risk for cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases. In addition the student will observe common cardiac surgeries and diagnostic procedures to better understand the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular, pulmonary and metabolic disease.

KINE 5192. INTERNSHIP IN GRADED EXERCISE TESTING FOR HIGH RISK POPULATIONS. 1 Hour.

The student will complete 200 hours of graded exercise testing in an approved hospital or outpatient clinical setting which conducts exercise tests for high risk populations, including clients with suspected cardiopulmonary and metabolic diseases. The student will be exposed to noninvasive (echocardiography and graded exercise testing) and invasive methods used to diagnose cardiopulmonary and metabolic disease, including procedures conducted in cath and nuclear testing laboratories.

KINE 5193. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE INTERNSHIP. 1 Hour.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise physiology setting (e.g., physical medicine, athletic training, external laboratory, health/fitness facility, professional teams or sports management) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional.

KINE 5194. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 1 Hour.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology.

KINE 5195. INTERNSHIP IN GRADED EXERCISE TESTING FOR HIGH RISK POPULATIONS. 1 Hour.

The student will complete 200 hours of graded exercise testing in an approved hospital or outpatient clinical setting which conducts exercise tests for high risk populations, including clients with suspected cardiopulmonary and metabolic diseases. The student will be exposed to noninvasive (echocardiography and graded exercise testing) and invasive methods used to diagnose cardiopulmonary and metabolic disease, including procedures conducted in cath and nuclear testing laboratories.

KINE 5196. LABORATORY TECHNIQUES IN EXERCISE SCIENCE. 1 Hour.

A primary objective of this course is to further your understanding of exercise physiology. A second but equally important objective is to enhance your ability for critical thinking on exercise physiology through the scientific process. This includes formation of a research question, hypothesis, designing an experiment, and inferring conclusions from data. Secondary objectives include improving technology skills to assist collecting and analyzing data, and writing and oral communication skills for demonstrating understanding of the physiological principles.

KINE 5198. THESIS. 1 Hour.

KINE 5220. PREVENTATIVE AND ACUTE CARE TECHNIQUES IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. 2 Hours.

Classroom and laboratory experiences designed to provide students with formal instruction and evaluation in the prevention and acute care of activity related injuries and illnesses.

KINE 5221. CLINICAL ATHLETIC TRAINING II. 2 Hours.

Clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 275 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5420, KINE 5220, KINE 5120.

KINE 5222. CLINICAL ATHLETIC TRAINING III. 2 Hours.

Lecture and associated clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 275 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5430, KINE 5433, KINE 5221.

KINE 5223. CLINICAL ATHLETIC TRAINING IV. 2 Hours.

Lecture and associated clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of clinical hours of experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5431, KINE 5434, KINE 5222.

KINE 5224. CLINICAL ATHLETIC TRAINING V. 2 Hours.

Lecture and associated clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 275 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5432, KINE 5223.

KINE 5225. CLINICAL ATHLETIC TRAINING VI. 2 Hours.

Lecture and associated clinical experiences in selected health care settings that provide students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills into actual patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the development of clinical decision-making skills. This course requires the completion of 275 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of a program approved clinical preceptor. Prerequisite: KINE 5333, KINE 5343, KINE 5224.

KINE 5226. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY II. 2 Hours.

Further study of acute and chronic illnesses and their response to, and impact on, physical activity. Discussion of pharmacological agents used in the care of general illnesses and musculoskeletal disorders in the physically active. Prerequisite: KINE 5348.

KINE 5227. LITERATURE AND RESEARCH FOR THE ATHLETIC TRAINER. 2 Hours.

This course is an overview of concepts and procedures necessary for designing, conducting, and critically appraising research in Athletic Training from multiple research paradigms. The course will focus on the steps involved in the administration of a research project, including literature review, design, data collection and analysis. Prerequisite: KINE 5226, KINE 5347, KINE 5223.

KINE 5228. SEMINAR IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. 2 Hours.

A capstone course designed to provide students the opportunity to synthesize and integrate the athletic training theories and concepts taught in the previous courses. Class discussions and projects will emphasize health care administration, professional development, cultural competence, transition to practice, inter-professional education and skills required of the entry-level athletic trainer. Prerequisite: KINE 5333, KINE 5227, KINE 5224.

KINE 5290. SPECIAL TOPICS IN KINESIOLOGY. 2 Hours.

In-depth study of selected topics in physical education and exercise science. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

KINE 5291. INTERNSHIP IN CARDIOPULMONARY REHABILITATION. 2 Hours.

The student will complete 400 internship hours in an approved Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation setting. The student may take two semesters of KINE 5191 at 200 hours each. The student will be involved in patient/client assessment, training, rehabilitation, risk factor identification and lifestyle management services provided for individuals with or at risk for cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases. In addition the student will observe common cardiac surgeries and diagnostic procedures to better understand the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular, pulmonary and metabolic disease.

KINE 5292. SPECIAL TOPICS IN KINESIOLOGY. 2 Hours.

KINE 5293. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE INTERNSHIP. 2 Hours.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise physiology setting (e.g., physical medicine, athletic training, external laboratory, health/fitness facility, professional teams or sports management) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional.

KINE 5294. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 2 Hours.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology.

KINE 5298. THESIS. 2 Hours.

KINE 5300. RESEARCH METHODS IN KINESIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

This course is an overview of concepts and procedures necessary for designing, conducting, and analyzing research in Kinesiology from multiple research paradigms. The course will focus on the steps involved in the administration of a research project, including literature review, design, data collection and analysis.

KINE 5305. APPLIED STATISTICAL PRINCIPLES IN KINESIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

The course covers descriptive statistics, elementary probability, one- and two-population mean and variance comparisons, ANOVA, simple linear regression, and correlations. In addition, more advanced principles in parametric and non-parametric statistics will be emphasized.

KINE 5320. ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

Lecture and laboratory sessions are designed to investigate concepts of energy metabolism, lactate production and accumulation, energy expenditure, excess post exercise oxygen consumption, cardiovascular and temperature regulation, neuromuscular control, aerobic and anaerobic adaptations and ergonomics.

KINE 5322. METABOLISM & EXERCISE BIOCHEMISTRY. 3 Hours.

This course will address the regulation of exercise metabolism as well as the distinct biochemical pathways through which energy transduction occurs. This will allow the student to appreciate not only the end result of metabolism, ultimately the production and maintenance of cellular ATP levels, but also the pathways that biological machines use to achieve ATP homeostasis. Calorimetry, respiratory exchange ratio, and substrate utilization during exercise will be assessed as part of the laboratory section of this course.

KINE 5323. MOTOR CONTROL AND LEARNING. 3 Hours.

This course advances on fundamental concepts of motor behavior and performance combining theoretical principles to a variety of realistic contexts to provide the basis of skilled behavior. Contemporary research in human motor behavior models is used to identify effective solutions to practical problems and to spark ideas for optimizing development, learning, and control of motor skills.

KINE 5326. CARDIOCIRCULATORY PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

The structure and function of the cardiovascular and circulatory system will be studied, as well as, cardiac control, the cardiac cycle, cardiac output, hemodynamics, vascular resistance, arterial-venous oxygen difference and oxygen delivery and consumption. Heat production and thermal control during exercise will also be addressed in lecture and laboratory sessions.

KINE 5327. PULMONARY PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

Examines the structure and function of the pulmonary system including mechanics of breathing, lung capacity tests, pulmonary circulation, lung diseases, gas exchang, ventilation, diffusing capacity, acid/base balance, neural and chemical regulation of breathing, and blood flow with respect to rest and exercise values in healthy and diseased populations. Prerequisite: KINE 5320.

KINE 5328. NEUROMUSCULAR PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

The structure and function of muscle, including the motor unit, control and integration, central and peripheral modifiers of neuromuscular control and biochemical characteristics of fibers will be studied. These concepts will also be applied to concepts in strength and power development.

KINE 5329. STRENGTH & CONDITIONING IN SPORT AND PERFORMANCE. 3 Hours.

The course covers the physiology and biomechanics of strength training and conditioning. Additional topics include: testing and evaluation of athletes, resistance training techniques, training program design, and organization administration of a strength training facility. This course is designed to prepare students to take the CSCS certification examination. Prerequisite: current CPR certification, KINE 3300, KINE 3301, KINE 3315, or permission of the instructor.

KINE 5330. ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

This course will address the impact of environmental stress (e.g., thermal, gravitational, microgravity, etc.) on the cardiovascular system. Related focus will be given to cardiac function, blood pressure regulation and thermoregulation. Topics will be addressed in lecture and laboratory sessions. *Doctoral students will be required to complete an additional research-related assignment.

KINE 5331. OBESITY & WEIGHT MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

This course is a review of the scientific literature on the causes and consequences of obesity. Topics include techniques for assessing body composition, factors promoting fat metabolism and deposition, traditional and non-traditional weight-loss programs, and adherence to weight-loss programs. Offered as KINE 4331 and KINE 5331. Credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite: KINE 5320 or permission of department.

KINE 5333. Health Care Administration. 3 Hours.

A study of the administrative issues and management theories that may be encountered in overseeing an athletic training/sports medicine program. Special emphasis is placed on the practical application of concepts related to legal liability, facility design and maintenance, financial and budget management, common health insurance models, insurance contract negotiation, strategic planning as a means to assess and promote organizational improvement, the impact of organizational structure on the daily operations of a healthcare facility, components of developing and implementing a basic business plan, medical record and documentation systems, federal and state infection control regulations and guidelines, risk management plan development, emergency action planning, and general day to day operations. Prerequisites: KINE 5431, KINE 5434, KINE 5432.

KINE 5334. Seminar in Athletic Training. 3 Hours.

Synthesis of theories and concepts in athletic training. Review of the competencies and proficiencies in athletic training with special emphasis on professional development and the refinement of clinical decision-making.

KINE 5335. GRADED EXERCISE TESTING AND PRESCRIPTION. 3 Hours.

The knowledge and skills necessary for assessment of health history and appraisal, blood pressure, electrocardiogram, cardiovascular fitness and function will be acquired in lecture and laboratory sessions. Various test modalities and protocols will be discussed for health and diseased populations.

KINE 5336. ECG INTERPRETATION. 3 Hours.

Principles of electrocardiography will be explored, with emphasis on interpretation of resting and stress ECGs. Interpretation of dynamic rhythm strips will prepare students to work in cardiac rehabilitation and other allied health professions.

KINE 5337. STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING IN GENERAL POPULATIONS: HEALTH AND DISEASE. 3 Hours.

This course covers the physiology and biomechanics of strength training and conditioning as it applies to the general populations across the spectrum of health and disease. This includes: testing, evaluation, resistance training techniques and training program design for individuals with orthopedic injuries and rehabilitation concerns, metabolic conditions (e.g., diabetes), youth, elderly, and pregnant or post-prenatal women. This course is designed to prepare students to take the NSCA-CPT, and apply the skills needed to be a leader within the personal training and physical therapy career paths. Prerequisite: KINE 3300, KINE 3315, and KINE 3325.

KINE 5338. EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS. 3 Hours.

This course will discuss the pathophysiology of cardiovascular, metabolic and pulmonary diseases. Methods of exercise prescription and issues of concern will also be presented for these populations, as well as, low back pain, pregnancy, osteoporosis, cancer, anorexia and bulimia, children, adolescents, teens, older adults, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Practical application of leadership skills and hands-on instruction will be addressed in the laboratory portion of this course.

KINE 5340. ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

This course will address the impact of environmental stress (e.g., thermal, gravitational, microgravity, etc.) on the cardiovascular system. Related focus will be given to cardiac function, blood pressure regulation and thermoregulation. Topics will be addressed in lecture and laboratory sessions.

KINE 5341. IMMEDIATE AND EMERGENCY CARE 1. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide knowledge of emergency medicine along with medical/legal and ethical issues. Students will also be required to complete a scholarship project concerning general emergency care and acute management of injuries and illnesses. Clinical hours will be required in an emergency medicine environment.

KINE 5342. IMMEDIATE AND EMERGENCY CARE 2. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to build off of Immediate and Emergency Care 1 and include didactic and clinical experiences surrounding best practices in general emergency care and acute management of injuries and illness. Students will also be required to complete a scholarship project concerning general emergency care and acute management of injuries and illnesses. Clinical hours will be required in an emergency medicine environment.

KINE 5343. LITERATURE AND RESEARCH FOR THE ATHLETIC TRAINER. 3 Hours.

This course is an overview of concepts and procedures necessary for designing, conducting, and critically appraising research in Athletic Training from multiple research paradigms. The course will focus on the steps involved in the administration of a research project, including literature review, design, data collection and analysis. Prerequisite: KINE 5432.

KINE 5344. SCHOLARSHIP IN ATHLETIC TRAINING PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to build off of the foundations of Literature and Research for the Athletic Trainerwith further study of data collection and analysis as well as evidence-based practice principles. Students will be expected to complete a scholarship project related to athletic training practice. Prerequisite: KINE 5343.

KINE 5345. SPORT NUTRITION. 3 Hours.

Overview of nutrients necessary for healthful living and nutritional impact on reducing risk factors of lifestyle diseases. Application of nutrient recommendations for sports and exercise activities, including fluid replacement, sports supplements, and ergogenic aids. In addition, students will construct plans for dietary intake of athletes during training and competition for both endurance and resistance training. Offered as KINE 5345 and KINE 3301. Credit will be granted only once.

KINE 5346. ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT AND CORRECTIVE EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

Classroom and laboratory experiences that provide an introduction to functional assessment and corrective exercises. Specific topics will include an analysis of common biomechanics of movement and the evidence-based application of functional assessment and assignment of corrective exercises. Prerequisite: KINE 5420, KINE 5430, KINE 5431, KINE 5433, KINE 5434.

KINE 5347. ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT AND CORRECTIVE EXERCISE. 3 Hours.

Classroom and laboratory experiences that provide an introduction to functional assessment and corrective exercises. Specific topics will include an analysis of common biomechanics of movement and the evidence-based application of functional assessment and assignment of corrective exercises. Prerequisite: KINE 5420, KINE 5430, KINE 5431, KINE 5433, KINE 5434.

KINE 5348. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY I. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the study of acute and chronic illnesses and their response to, and impact on, physical activity. Discussion of pharmacological principles used in the care of general illnesses and musculoskeletal disorders in the physically active. Prerequisite: KINE 5420, KINE 5220, KINE 5120.

KINE 5350. APPLIED BIOMECHANICS. 3 Hours.

Application of Newtonian mechanics to human movement analysis. Biomechanical models using three-dimensional video and force plate data will be used to analyze human movement.

KINE 5360. FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of human physiology. Physiological function is a complex process that involves a complex interaction among the various physiological systems. As such there will be an emphasis on the integration of cellular, cardiovascular, renal, autonomic, respiratory, and endocrine physiology.

KINE 5370. GLOBAL HEALTH. 3 Hours.

Today's public health practice requires an awareness of health threats beyond U.S. borders. "Global health" implies health concerns and solutions that are shared worldwide. In this course, students will study global health priorities among different populations, cultures, and health systems. Students will examine health challenges and disease threats faced in resource-constrained countries, and the roles of health determinants, socioeconomics and health equity in improving health outcomes. In addition, students will learn about the foundational elements of global health, including globalization and health, water, sanitation, the burden of infectious and chronic diseases, human rights and global health partnerships.

KINE 5371. PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION. 3 Hours.

Before we can effectively receive funding and implement programs that benefit our communities, we have to answer many questions. Who is the target audience? What are the program's goals? What are the intended outcomes of the program? How can we measure program effectiveness? Program evaluation is the methodology to developing scientifically sound answers to these questions. This course will teach you how evaluators work with stakeholders and project teams to tailor an intervention to a target audience, and document program activities, outcomes and impact on a community health issue. This course will allow you to have hands-on experience designing and conducting program evaluation.

KINE 5372. INTRODUCTION TO EPIDEMIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

By participating in this course students will learn the critical role that epidemiology plays in preventing and controlling disease. This course provides students with a foundation of the methods and concepts used in epidemiology. Students will learn the measures used in epidemiology and apply principles of causality, study design, disease surveillance, and outbreak investigations. In addition, students will be introduced to sources of data used in epidemiologic studies. The major course project will provide students with hands-on experience using skills sought by employers in public health agencies.

KINE 5373. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the critical environmental health problems in industrialized and developing countries, discusses their causes and solutions, and emphasizes the role of science in environmental policy decisions. Topics include climate change, water and air contaminants, injury risk and prevention in the workplace, food and water-borne disease, toxic metals, and how the body reacts to environmental pollutants.

KINE 5374. RACE, ETHNICITY AND HEALTH. 3 Hours.

Despite advances in medicine and health policies, racial and ethnic health disparities persist. Americans of color have higher mortality rates and an unequal burden of many health concerns compared to their white counterparts. Such health inequities compromise the cultural and economic fabric of our country. This course will discuss the complex relationship between socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, and health. In addition, this course will examine the economic and societal threats that health disparities pose to our communities and nation, as well as policies and approaches to addressing such disparities.

KINE 5375. POPULATION HEALTH. 3 Hours.

This course explores population health, providing students with learning experiences that facilitate an understanding of what public health is and why it is important. Course activities guide students in exploring their role in population health dynamics of their communities. The course will provide students an investigation of theoretical and evidence-based strategies designed to improve community health from population-based approaches. Students will then narrow those areas of foci to contemplate real-world, practice-based learning experiences.

KINE 5376. INTRODUCTION TO BIOSTATISTICS. 3 Hours.

The course will introduce students to analysis skills applied in the public health sciences. Students will learn how to apply descriptive statistics, t-tests, ANOVA, correlation, multiple regression, and non-parametric statistics to public health problems.

KINE 5377. INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH SYSTEMS AND POLICY. 3 Hours.

What is "population health" and why does it matter? Why are U.S. health care costs so high? How is the U.S. health system financed? What are the basic principles of health insurance? Who are the uninsured? It is critical that public health professionals be able to answer these questions and understand the basic functions that comprise the U.S. health care system. This course will help students answer these questions through an introduction to health systems and policy, including the delivery, quality and costs of health care for individuals and populations. The course will also examine the structure, processes and outcomes of health services, financing, organization, outcomes and accessibility of care.

KINE 5389. RESEARCH MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSION. 3 Hours.

The student will collect scientific data in the Physiology of Exercise laboratories or in a work-related environment under the supervision of a faculty member. The student will analyze the data, write a manuscript, and submit a manuscript for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. This course must be taken in the final semester of graduate work and requires approval of the Graduate Advisor.

KINE 5390. SPECIAL TOPICS IN KINESIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

In-depth study of selected topics in physical education and exercise science. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

KINE 5392. SPECIAL TOPICS IN KINESIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

KINE 5393. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE INTERNSHIP. 3 Hours.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise physiology setting(e.g., physical medicine, athletic training, external laboratory, health/fitness facility, professional teams or sports management) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional.

KINE 5394. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology.

KINE 5396. RESEARCH IN ATHLECTIC TRAINING. 3 Hours.

Independent research under the supervision of an individual faculty member; may be repeated for credit with consent of Graduate Advisor. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

KINE 5397. INTERNSHIP ATHLETIC TRAINING. 3 Hours.

Individualized clinical experience in an external athletic training or other medical setting (e.g., physician's office, rehabilitation clinic, professional sports teams) under the direct supervision of a health care professional.

KINE 5398. THESIS. 3 Hours.

KINE 5420. CONCEPTS IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. 4 Hours.

Classroom and laboratory experiences that provide an introduction to the profession of Athletic Training with an emphasis on prevention and acute care of activity related injuries and illnesses. Specific topics will include injury prevention strategies; emergency first aid and acute care; superficial application of therapeutic modalities; nutritional considerations; and environmental considerations.

KINE 5430. ORTHOPEDIC ASSESSMENT I. 4 Hours.

A study of the common orthopedic injuries involving the lower extremities, with a special emphasis on recognition, evaluation, diagnosis, and initial management. Prerequisites: KINE 5120, KINE 5220, and KINE 5420.

KINE 5431. Orthopedic Assessment II. 4 Hours.

A study of the common orthopedic injuries involving the upper extremities, spine, head, and face with a special emphasis on recognition, evaluation, diagnosis, and initial management. Prerequisite: KINE 5430.

KINE 5432. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY. 4 Hours.

A study of acute and chronic illnesses and their response to, and impact on, physical activity. Discussion of pharmacological agents used in the care of general illnesses and musculoskeletal disorders in the physically active. Prerequisite: KINE 5430, KINE 5433, KINE 5130.

KINE 5433. THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS I. 4 Hours.

A study of the scientific theory and basic principles of musculoskeletal rehabilitation and therapeutic modalities. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the disablement model and learning how to plan, implement, document, and evaluate programs for the rehabilitation and reconditioning of injuries and illnesses of athletes and others involved with physical activity. Operation of superficial heating and cooling therapeutic modalities and how manual treatments (e.g., traction, muscle energy and massage) can be incorporated into a rehabilitation program will be investigated. The underlying principles and application techniques for each modality, therapeutic exercise progressions, patient clinical goals, legal and safe practice guidelines, and evidence based therapeutic modality science will allow for critical thinking and problem solving in relation to common lower extremity injuries. Both surgical and non-surgical rehabilitation models for the lower extremity will be discussed with a special emphasis on the use of functional progressions. Prerequisites: KINE 5420, KINE 5220, KINE 5120.

KINE 5434. THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS II. 4 Hours.

A study of the upper extremity and low back rehabilitation protocols and the use of electric therapeutic modalities (e.g., ultrasound, diathermy, laser, and electric stimulation). Emphasis will be placed on understanding the disablement model and learning how to plan, implement, document, and evaluate programs for the rehabilitation and reconditioning of injuries and illnesses of athletes and others involved with physical activity. Operation of electrical therapeutic modalities and how they can be incorporated into a rehabilitation program will be investigated. The underlying principles and application techniques for each modality, therapeutic exercise progressions, patient clinical goals, legal and safe practice guidelines, and evidence based therapeutic modality science will allow for critical thinking and problem solving in relation to common upper extremity and low back injuries. Both surgical and non-surgical rehabilitation models for the upper extremity and low back will be discussed with a special emphasis on the use of functional progressions. Prerequisite: KINE 5433.

KINE 5498. THESIS. 4 Hours.

KINE 5598. THESIS. 5 Hours.

KINE 5647. ALL-LEVEL TEACHER PREPARATION STUDENT TEACHING FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 6 Hours.

This supervised course is designed as a culminating field experience of pre-service professional preparation giving an opportunity to practically apply theoretical and pedagogical knowledge in real school settings. Applied experience will be attained in both Elementary and Secondary settings. A research project will be required to be arranged with course supervisor. Criminal background check required. Prerequisite: KINE 1315, KINE 2301, KINE 2302, KINE 3304, KINE 3388, KINE 4319, KINE 4320, KINE 4321, EDUC 5310, EDUC 5314, and LIST 5345.

KINE 5693. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE INTERNSHIP. 6 Hours.

Individualized academic training in an external professional exercise physiology setting (e.g., physical medicine, athletic training, external laboratory, health/fitness facility, professional teams or sports management) under the direct supervision of an exercise science professional.

KINE 5694. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 6 Hours.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology.

KINE 5698. THESIS. 6 Hours.

KINE 5994. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 9 Hours.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology.

KINE 6100. SEMINAR IN KINESIOLOGY. 1 Hour.

Implements the research process with faculty guidance. Students will attend regularly scheduled lectures from internal and external faculty members. Learning activities based on student and faculty interest.

KINE 6103. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. 1 Hour.

The philosophy and methods of conducting a university class for undergraduates are examined. Specific tips and suggestions for managing course materials, lectures, audiovisual aids, grading, etc. will be presented. The role of the university instructor as a researcher as well as a teacher will be elaborated. Specific topics will include the ethics and regulation of research, service as a journal referee, corresponding with peers, participating in a research team, manuscript preparation, presentation at professional conferences, and submitting material for publication.

KINE 6105. LABORATORY TECHNIQUE ROTATIONS IN KINESIOLOGY I. 1 Hour.

A primary objective of this course is to further your understanding of lab work in Kinesiology. A second objective is to enhance your ability for critical thinking in Kinesiology through the scientific process. This includes formation of a research question, hypothesis, designing an experiment, and inferring conclusions from data. Secondary objectives include improving technology skills to assist collecting and analyzing data, and writing and oral communication skills for demonstrating understanding of the kinesiology principles. Prerequisite: Consent of faculty.

KINE 6106. LABORATORY TECHNIQUE ROTATIONS IN KINESIOLOGY II. 1 Hour.

A primary objective of this course is to further your understanding of lab work in Kinesiology. A second objective is to enhance your ability for critical thinking in Kinesiology through the scientific process. This includes formation of a research question, hypothesis, designing an experiment, and inferring conclusions from data. Secondary objectives include improving technology skills to assist collecting and analyzing data, and writing and oral communication skills for demonstrating understanding of the kinesiology principles. This section must occur in a different laboratory than KINE 6105. Prerequisite: KINE 6105 and consent of faculty.

KINE 6194. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 1 Hour.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology. May be repeated for credit with consent of the Graduate Advisor. Graded P/F/R. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

KINE 6293. GRANT WRITING. 2 Hours.

Students will learn strategies associated with grant applications. Students will prepare an individual proposal associated with a research grant application. Although submission for funding (e.g., pre-doctoral fellowship) is not required for the course, students will develop and complete a grant application.

KINE 6294. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 2 Hours.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology. May be repeated for credit with consent of the Graduate Advisor. Graded P/F/R. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

KINE 6394. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology. May be repeated for credit with consent of the Graduate Advisor. Graded P/F/R. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

KINE 6399. DISSERTATION. 3 Hours.

Preparation and submission of a doctoral dissertation in an area of kinesiology. Graded R/F only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. in Kinesiology.

KINE 6694. RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY. 6 Hours.

Individually approved research projects selected from the various areas of Kinesiology. May be repeated for credit with consent of the Graduate Advisor. Graded P/F/R. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

KINE 6699. DISSERTATION. 6 Hours.

Preparation and submission of a doctoral dissertation in an area of kinesiology. Graded R/F only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. in Kinesiology.

KINE 6999. DISSERTATION. 9 Hours.

Preparation and submission of a doctoral dissertation in an area of kinesiology. Graded R/F only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. in Kinesiology.

KINE 7399. DOCTORAL DEGREE COMPLETION. 3 Hours.

This course may be taken during the semester in which a student expects to complete all requirements for the doctoral degree and graduate. Enrolling in this course meets minimum enrollment requirements for graduation, for holding fellowships awarded by The Office of Graduate Studies and for full-time GTA or GRA positions. Students should verify that enrollment in this course meets other applicable enrollment requirements. To remain eligible in their final semester of study for grants, loans or other forms of financial aid administered by the Financial Aid Office must enroll in a minimum of 5 hours as required by the Office of Financial Aid. Other funding sources may also require more than 3-hours of enrollment. Additional hours may also be required to meet to requirements set by immigration law or by the policies of the student's degree program. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office, other sources of funding, Office of International Education and/or their graduate advisor to verify enrollment requirements before registering for this course. This course may only be taken once and may not be repeated. Students who do not complete all graduation requirements while enrolled in this course must enroll in a minimum of 6 dissertation hours (6699 or 6999) in their graduation term. Graded P/F/R.

Faculty

Paul J. Fadel
Professor

Barry McKeown
Professor

Mark Ricard
Professor

Matthew Brothers
Associate Professor

David Keller
Associate Professor

Larry Nelson
Associate Professor

Rhonda D. Prisby
Associate Professor

Cynthia Trowbridge
Associate Professor

Judy Wilson
Associate Professor

Priscila Cacola
Assistant Professor

Michael D. Nelson
Assistant Professor

Erin K. Carlson
Clinical Assistant Professor

Rebecca Crow
Clinical Assistant Professor

Meredith Decker
Clinical Assistant Professor

Tyler Garner
Clinical Assistant Professor

Rebecca Garner
Clinical Assistant Professor

Brad Heddins
Clinical Assistant Professor

Alison White
Clinical Assistant Professor

Abu Yilla
Clinical Assistant Professor

Paul J. Krawietz
Clinical Associate Professor

Luzita I. Vela
Clinical Associate Professor