Aerospace Engineering (AE)

Courses

AE 5101. GRADUATE SEMINAR. 1 Hour.

The purpose is to acquaint graduate students with ongoing research at UTA, and outside in academia and industry. Seminars are given by graduate students of the department based on their ongoing research. Seminars are also given by external speakers from academia, industry and government.

AE 5191. ADVANCED STUDIES IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING. 1 Hour.

Individual research or design project performed for fulfilling the requirements of the Master of Engineering degree option. Prior approval of the AE Graduate Advisor is required for enrollment. A written and/or oral report is required.

AE 5197. RESEARCH IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING. 1 Hour.

Research in masters programs.

AE 5291. ADVANCED STUDIES IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING. 2 Hours.

Individual research or design project performed for fulfilling the requirements of the Master of Engineering degree option. Prior approval of the AE Graduate Advisor is required for enrollment. A written and/or oral report is required.

AE 5297. RESEARCH IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING. 2 Hours.

Research in masters programs.

AE 5300. PREPARATORY COURSE FOR AEROSPACE ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

The course may be offered with multiple sections, wherein each section is paired with a corresponding UG course being offered that semester. The purpose of this course is to strengthen academic preparation of students who were found inadequately prepared for a graduate degree in Aerospace Engineering. Students can concurrently enroll in multiple sections and may need to enroll in this course multiple times until their academic preparation is deemed complete. In order to pass this class, the student has to earn at least a B grade in aggregate based on all the assignments and exams. The student will earn an R grade if the class aggregate is a C/D and will need to repeat the course until the student passes the class. The student will Fail the class if the aggregate is an F. The course may be repeated as often as required.

AE 5301. ADVANCED TOPICS IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

To provide formal instruction in special topics pertinent to Aerospace Engineering from semester to semester depending on the availability of faculty. May be repeated for credit as provided topics change.

AE 5302. ADVANCED FLIGHT MECHANICS. 3 Hours.

Rigid body motion. Kinematics and dynamics of aerospace vehicles. Linear and nonlinear control of aircraft and spacecraft. Advanced aircraft and spacecraft modeling and control issues. Prerequisite: MAE 3405 and MAE 4310.

AE 5303. CLASSICAL METHODS OF CONTROL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS. 3 Hours.

Equip the student with familiarity of significant tools of the control engineer. Topics covered include controllers and their effect on system performance and stability, block diagram algebra, stability and analysis, system performance definition, root locus, frequency techniques, and state variable methods. Digital simulation tools for design and simulation of control systems. Demonstration of controller design and performance in the laboratory. Also offered as ME 5303.

AE 5304. ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS. 3 Hours.

This graduate level course will cover the calculation of stresses and strains in a body that experiences elastic, plastic and/or viscoelastic deformation. This course will also highlight nanoelasticity to show the size-dependent structure-property relations of nanomaterials and piezoelectricity to demonstrate the voltage-displacement relations of piezoelectric materials. (Also offered as ME 5304.) Prerequisite: MAE 2312 or equivalent.

AE 5305. DYNAMIC SYSTEMS MODELING. 3 Hours.

To equip the student with the capability of determining the necessary equations for distributed and lumped parameter modeling of mixed physical system types including mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal components. Models are formulated for computer simulation and analysis for systems with deterministic and stochastic inputs. Topics of random vibration and system identification are included. Also offered as ME 5305.

AE 5310. FINITE ELEMENT METHODS. 3 Hours.

Finite element method in the study of the static response of complex structures and of continua applications to field problems; analytical methods emphasized and digital computer application undertaken. Also offered as ME 5310.

AE 5311. STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS. 3 Hours.

Natural frequencies; forced response of complex structural systems studied through the use of the finite element method; computational aspects of these problems discussed, and digital computer applications undertaken. Also offered as ME 5311.

AE 5312. CONTINUUM MECHANICS. 3 Hours.

Study of the underlying physical and mathematical principles relating to the behavior of continuous media; interrelationships between fluid and solid mechanics. Also offered as ME 5312.

AE 5313. FLUID DYNAMICS. 3 Hours.

Basic conservation laws, flow kinematics, special forms of the governing equations, two-dimensional potential flows, surface waves and some exact solutions of viscous incompressible flows. Also offered as ME 5313.

AE 5314. FRACTURE MECHANICS IN STRUCTURAL DESIGN. 3 Hours.

Linear elastic fracture mechanics, general yielding fracture mechanics, damage tolerance and durability design, fail safe and safe life design criteria, analysis of fatigue crack growth, residual strength analysis. Also offered as ME 5314.

AE 5315. FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPOSITES. 3 Hours.

Fundamental relationships between the mechanical and hygrothermal behavior and the composition of multiphase media; failure criteria. Also offered as ME 5315.

AE 5320. DESIGN OPTIMIZATION. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to present modern concepts of optimal design of structures. Basic ideas from optimization theory are developed with simple design examples. Analytical and numerical methods are developed and their applications discussed. Use of numerical simulation methods in the design process is described. Concepts of structural design sensitivity analysis and approximation methods will be discussed. The emphasis is made on the application of modern optimization techniques linked to the numerical methods of structural analysis, particularly, the finite element method. Prerequisite: AE 5310 or ME 5310.

AE 5322. AEROELASTICITY. 3 Hours.

Math models for the steady aerodynamics and structural stiffness of aircraft wings are presented and combined into a static aeroelastic math model. Loss of wing lift due to static aeroelasticity as well as the structural instability called aeroelastic divergence are covered.

AE 5323. ENGINEERING RESEARCH METHODS. 3 Hours.

This hands-on course will teach the tools that are essential for conducting graduate research, with an aim to prepare the students for project-based graduate research. The course will be focused on the integration of engineering concepts to complete course projects that imitate mini research projects. Prerequisite: Undergraduate education in engineering or science.

AE 5325. COMBUSTION. 3 Hours.

Fundamental treatment of problems involving simultaneous occurrence of chemical reaction and transfer of heat, mass and momentum. Topics include kinetically controlled combustion phenomena; diffusion flames in liquid fuel combustion; combustion of solids; combustion of gaseous fuel jets; flames in premixed gasses. Also offered as ME 5325.

AE 5326. AIR-BREATHING PROPULSION. 3 Hours.

Development of thrust and efficiency equations, thermodynamic cycle analysis, cycle design methods of aerospace propulsion systems, component performance analysis methods, component matching and dynamic interactions, and vehicle/propulsion-system integration.

AE 5327. COMPUTATIONAL AERODYNAMICS I. 3 Hours.

Solution of engineering problems by finite-difference methods, emphasis on aerodynamic problems characterized by single linear and non-linear equations, introduction to and application of major algorithms used in solving aerodynamics problems by computational methods.

AE 5328. COMPUTATIONAL AERODYNAMICS II. 3 Hours.

Review of the fundamental equations of aerodynamics, development of methods for solving Euler, boundary-layer, Navier-Stokes, and parabolized Navier-Stokes equations, application to practical aerodynamic analysis and design problems.

AE 5331. ANALYTIC METHODS IN ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

Introduction to advanced analytic methods in engineering. Methods include multivariable calculus and field theory, Fourier series, Fourier and Laplace Transforms. Also offered as ME 5331. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in engineering, physics, or mathematics.

AE 5332. ENGINEERING ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

Introduction to partial differential equations and complex variable theory with application to modeling of physical systems. Also offered as ME 5332.

AE 5335. OPTIMAL CONTROL OF DYNAMIC SYS. 3 Hours.

Linear and nonlinear optimization methods; optimal control; continuous time Ricatti equation; bang-bang control; singular arcs; differential inclusions; collocation techniques; design of optimal dynamic system trajectories. Also offered as ME 5335.

AE 5336. OPTIMAL ESTIMATION OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

Kalman filter design and implementation. Optimal filtering for discrete-time and continuous-time dynamical systems with noise. Wiener filtering. State-space determination. Prerequisite: Prior introductory systems or identification course is desirable. Also offered as ME 5336 and EE 6327.

AE 5337. INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS. 3 Hours.

An overview of industrial robots and their application to traditional and emerging applications. Coordinate systems and homogeneous transformations, kinematics of manipulators; motion characteristics and trajectories; dynamics and control of manipulators; actuation and design issues. Programming of industrial robotic manipulators in the laboratory. Also offered as ME 5337.

AE 5338. ANALYTICAL & COMPUTATIONAL DYN. 3 Hours.

The course focuses on developing the equations of motion for dynamic systems composed of multiple, connected and unconnected, rigid bodies using Kane's method and the Lagrangian approach. The resulting model is used to simulate and visualize the predicted motion. Topics include kinematics, Euler parameters, kinematic constraints, virtual work, the calculus of variations, energy, momentum, contact, impact, and checking functions. Also offered as ME 5338.

AE 5339. STRUCTURAL ASPECTS OF DESIGN. 3 Hours.

Emphasis on determination of stresses and prediction of failure in machine and structural components; stress-strain relations in elastic and plastic regions; static failure and failure criteria; contact stress; notched sensitivity; strain-fatigue life relationship; characteristics of cracks in structural components. Also offered as ME 5339.

AE 5341. CONTROL SYSTEM COMPONENTS. 3 Hours.

The components and hardware used in electronic, hydraulic, and pneumatic control systems; techniques of amplification, computation, compensation, actuation, and sensing; modeling of multiport systems as well as servo systems analysis. Pulse modulated systems. Prerequisite: Undergraduate introductory control course in Mechanical Engineering or equivalent or ME 5303 or equivalent. Also offered as ME 5341.

AE 5342. GAS DYNAMICS. 3 Hours.

Review of fundamental compressible flow theory, method of characteristics for perfect gases, the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions, linearized flow theory. Also offered as ME 5342.

AE 5345. NUMERICAL HEAT TRANSFER. 3 Hours.

Discussion of numerical methods for conduction and convection heat transfer problems includes introduction to various computational techniques suitable for digital computers. Finite difference method is emphasized. Also offered as ME 5345.

AE 5347. ROCKET PROPULSION. 3 Hours.

Thrust and efficiency relations, trajectory analysis, introduction to design and performance analysis of chemical (liquid and solid), electrical and nuclear rocket systems, combined cycle propulsion systems, and pulse detonation rockets.

AE 5348. HYPERSONIC PROPULSION. 3 Hours.

Design and performance analysis of propulsion systems for sustained flight at hypersonic speeds, airframe/propulsion system integration, supersonic combustion, finite-rate chemistry effects, radiative cooling.

AE 5360. MULTIDISCIPLINARY INVERSE DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION. 3 Hours.

For a new design of any realistic device to be competitive, it must satisfy a number of often conflicting requirements, objectives, and constraints. This course offers a variety of basic concepts and methodologies for inverse design and optimization with practical applications in fluid mechanics, heat transfer, elasticity, and electromagnetism. Also offered as ME 5360.

AE 5362. GUIDANCE, NAVIGATION, AND CONTROL OF AEROSPACE VEHICLES. 3 Hours.

Basics of flight dynamics and control. Autopilot structures for aerospace vehicles (aircraft, missiles, launch vehicles). Equilibrium glide trajectories for atmospheric flight. Discussion of the various guidance algorithms used in aircraft/missiles/launch vehicles. Basics of Kalman filtering, sensor and data fusion. Selection and trade-off between various navigation components such as the IMU, GPS and other navigation components. Integration of the guidance, navigation and control components in aerospace vehicles.

AE 5363. INTRODUCTION TO ROTORCRAFT ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

History of rotorcraft. Behavior of the rotor blade in hover and forward flight. Rotor configurations, dynamic coupling with the fuselage, elastic and aeroelastic effects. Also offered as ME 5363.

AE 5364. INTRODUCTION TO AERODYNAMICS OF ROTORCRAFT. 3 Hours.

Practical aerodynamics of rotors and other components of rotorcraft. Introduction to performance, handling qualities, and general flight mechanics related to rotorcraft design, test, and certification requirements. Emphasis is on real rotorcraft mission capabilities as defined by the customer. Also offered as ME 5364.

AE 5365. INTRODUCTION TO HELICOPTER AND TILTROTOR SIMULATION. 3 Hours.

Dynamic and aerodynamic modeling of rotorcraft elements using vector mechanics, linear algebra, calculus and numerical methods. Special emphasis on rotors, aerodynamic interference, proper axis system representation, model assembly methods and trimming. Also offered as ME 5365.

AE 5367. HIGH-SPEED AIRCRAFT AND SPACE ACCESS VEHICLE DESIGN. 3 Hours.

An introductory course on high-speed aircraft and space access vehicle design. The course concentrates on reusable flight vehicles. Topics covered are historical case studies, design disciplines, design space visualization and proof of design convergence. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor.

AE 5368. FLIGHT VEHICLE SYNTHESIS AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

An introductory course on multi-disciplinary design decision-making applied to flight vehicle design. The course introduces decision-making techniques leading to efficient aerospace product design. The following main topics are covered: a) management domain, b) operational domain, c) engineering domain. Prerequisites: MAE 4350, MAE 4351 or equivalent.

AE 5372. PARAMETRIC SIZING OF HIGH-SPEED AIRCRAFT. 3 Hours.

An introductory course on high-speed aircraft design. Aimed to develop insight into basic concepts underlining the analysis and design of supersonic and hypersonic aircraft. Topics covered are historical case studies, design disciplines, and design methodologies. Prerequisite: MAE 4350, MAE 4351 or equivalent.

AE 5374. NONLINEAR SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND CONTROLS. 3 Hours.

Nonlinear systems; phase plane analysis; Poincare-Bendixon theorems; nonlinear system stability; limit cycles and oscillations; center manifold theorem, Lyapunov methods in control; variable structure control; feedback linearization; backstepping techniques. Also offered as ME 5374.

AE 5378. INTRODUCTION TO UNMANNED VEHICLE SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

Introduction to UVS (Unmanned Vehicle Systems) such as UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems), UGS (Unmanned Ground System) and UMS (Unmanned Maritime System), their history, missions, capabilities, types, configurations, subsystems, and the disciplines needed for UVS development and operation. UVS missions could include student competitions sponsored by various technical organizations. This course is team-taught by engineering faculty. Also offered as MAE 4378 and AE 5378.

AE 5379. UNMANNED VEHICLE SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the technologies needed to create an UVS (Unmanned Vehicle System). Integration of these technologies (embodied as a set of sensors, actuators, computing and mobility platform sub-systems) into a functioning UVS through team work. UVS could be designed to compete in a student competition sponsored by various technical organizations or to support a specific mission or function defined by the instructors. This course is team-taught by engineering faculty. Also offered as MAE 4379 and ME 5379. Prerequisite: B or better in MAE 4378 or AE 5378 or ME 5378 and admission to the UVS certificate program.

AE 5380. DESIGN OF DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

Difference equations, Z- and w-transforms, discrete TF (Transfer Function). Discrete equivalence (DE) to continuous TF. Aliasing & Nyquist sampling theorem. Design by DE, root locus in z-plane & Youla parameterization. Discrete state-space model, minimality after sampling, pole placement, Moore-Kimura method, linear quadratic regulator, asymptotic observer. Computer simulation and/or lab implementation. Also offered as ME 5380, EE 5324. Prerequisite: MAE 4310 or equivalent.

AE 5381. BOUNDARY LAYERS. 3 Hours.

An introductory course on boundary layers. The coverage emphasizes the physical understanding and the mathematical foundations of boundary layers, including applications. Topics covered include laminar and turbulent incompressible and compressible layers, and an introduction to boundary layer transition. Also offered as ME 5381.

AE 5382. ADVANCED ASTRONAUTICS. 3 Hours.

Topics include orbital mechanics, orbital maneuvering, relative motion, orbit determination and estimation, three body problem, perturbations and numerical techniques.

AE 5383. HYPERSONIC FLOW. 3 Hours.

A study of the basic principles of hypersonic flows. Inviscid and viscous hypersonic flows. The course focuses on the effects of high temperature on the gas properties and associated effects on canonical gasdynamics processes. Applications in aerodynamic heating and atmospheric entry. Application of numerical methods.

AE 5386. WIND & OCEAN CURRENT ENERGY HARVESTING FUNDAMENTALS. 3 Hours.

A broad senior/graduate first course in wind/wave/ocean current energy harvesting systems, focused on fundamentals, and serving as the basis for subsequent MAE specialized follow-on graduate course offerings focused on structures (conventional and composite), aero/hydro-mechanical response and control, and tailoring and smart material actuation, respectively, as well as for non-MAE, specialized graduate courses.

AE 5391. ADVANCED STUDIES IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

Individual research or design project performed for fulfilling the requirements of the Master of Engineering degree option. Prior approval of the AE Graduate Advisor is required for enrollment. A written and/or oral report is required.

AE 5397. RESEARCH IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

Research in masters programs.

AE 5398. THESIS. 3 Hours.

Thesis.

AE 5400. PREPARATORY COURSE FOR AEROSPACE ENGINEERING. 4 Hours.

The course may be offered with multiple sections, wherein each section is paired with a corresponding UG course being offered that semester. The purpose of this course is to strengthen academic preparation of students who were found inadequately prepared for a graduate degree in Aerospace Engineering. Students can concurrently enroll in multiple sections and may need to enroll in this course multiple times until their academic preparation is deemed complete. In order to pass this class, the students has to earn at least a B grade in aggregate based all the assignments and exams. The student will earn an R grade if the class aggregate is a C/D and will need to repeat the course until the student passes the class. The student will Fail the class if the aggregate is an F. The course may be repeated as often as required.

AE 5698. THESIS. 6 Hours.

Thesis.

AE 6196. AEROSPACE ENGINEERING INTERNSHIP. 1 Hour.

For students participating in internship programs. Requires prior approval of Graduate Advisor.

AE 6197. RESEARCH IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING. 1 Hour.

Research in doctoral programs.

AE 6297. RESEARCH IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING. 2 Hours.

Research in doctoral programs.

AE 6299. DISSERTATION. 2 Hours.

Dissertation Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the Doctoral of Philosophy degree.

AE 6310. ADVANCED FINITE ELEMENT METHODS. 3 Hours.

Modeling of large systems, composite and incompressible materials, substructuring, mesh generation, solids applications, nonlinear problems. Also offered as ME 6310.

AE 6311. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS. 3 Hours.

Normal mode method for undamped and proportionally damped systems,component mode synthesis, generally damped systems, complex modes, effect of design modification on system response. Also offered as ME 6311. Prerequisite: ME 5311, AE 5311 or equivalent.

AE 6315. ADVANCED COMPOSITES. 3 Hours.

Review of current state-of-the-art applications of composites: composite structural analysis; structural properties, damage characterization and failure mechanism; stiffness loss due to damage, notched sensitivity; delamination;impact; fatigue characteristics; composite material testing; material allowables; characteristics of composite joints. Also offered as ME 6315 and MSE 5349. Prerequisite: ME 5315, AE 5315 or MSE 5348 or equivalent.

AE 6337. ADVANCED ROBOTICS. 3 Hours.

Advanced robotic design concepts considering structural statics, dynamics and control strategies for both rigid and flexible manipulators will be studied using optimization techniques and analytical approaches and introduction to micro- and mobile robotic devices. Study of emerging applications of robotics will be explored. Digital simulation of robotic devices and programming and demonstration of robotic devices in the laboratory. Prerequisites: AE 5337 or ME 5337 or equivalent.

AE 6345. TURBULENCE. 3 Hours.

Physical,numerical and theoretical aspects of turbulence. Review of the conservation equations for incompressible flow. Statistical descriptions pertaining to fluid mechanics. Classical description of turbulence via Reynolds averaging is developed with emphasis on homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. Application to free and wall-bounded flows. Modeling and simulation, including direct numerical simulation, classical turbulence modeling, PDF methods and large eddy simulation. Familiarity with vector or tensor notation is expected. Prerequisite: An advanced course in fluid mechanics (AE 5313/ME 5313) or continuum mechanics (AE 5312/ME 5312).

AE 6397. RESEARCH IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

Research in doctoral programs.

AE 6399. DISSERTATION. 3 Hours.

Dissertation Prerequisite: admission to candidacy for the Doctor of Philosophy degree.

AE 6697. RESEARCH IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING. 6 Hours.

Research in doctoral programs.

AE 6699. DISSERTATION. 6 Hours.

Dissertation. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the Doctor of Philosophy degree.

AE 6999. DISSERTATION. 9 Hours.

Dissertation. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the Doctor of Philosophy degree.

AE 7399. DOCTORAL DEGREE COMPLETION. 3 Hours.

This course may be taken during the semester in which a student expects to complete all requirements for the doctoral degree and graduate. Enrolling in this course meets minimum enrollment requirements for graduation, for holding fellowships awarded by The Office of Graduate Studies and for full-time GTA or GRA positions. Students should verify that enrollment in this course meets other applicable enrollment requirements. To remain eligible in their final semester of study for grants, loans or other forms of financial aid administered by the Financial Aid Office must enroll in a minimum of 5 hours as required by the Office of Financial Aid. Other funding sources may also require more than 3-hours of enrollment. Additional hours may also be required to meet to requirements set by immigration law or by the policies of the student's degree program. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office, other sources of funding, Office of International Education and/or their graduate advisor to verify enrollment requirements before registering for this course. This course may only be taken once and may not be repeated. Students who do not complete all graduation requirements while enrolled in this course must enroll in a minimum of 6 dissertation hours (6699 or 6999) in their graduation term. Graded P/F/R.