Linguistics (LING)

Courses

LING 2301. INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF HUMAN LANGUAGE. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the scientific study of human language, using English as an example. Topics in the course include how sounds are produced, how words and sentences are structured, how and why language changes, how language is acquired by children and adults, how the brain processes language, and how language and society intersect.

LING 2351. E-LANGUAGES. 3 Hours.

Human languages can be spoken or written, but today much of our language use is also transmitted through electronic devices. This course looks at aspects of language as reflected in the use of the technologies of modem life. Topics may include the language used in texting, chat, machine tools for recognizing print and speech, and computer translators.

LING 2371. LANGUAGE IN A MULTICULTURAL USA. 3 Hours.

The relationship between language in the U.S. and social power. This course explores how negative attitudes toward some language varieties and languages spoken in the U.S. arise from social factors, rather than features of the languages themselves. In addition to studying language varieties, the course shows how American institutions such as the educational system and the media reinforce these negative attitudes and contribute to discrimination.

LING 3301. TOPICS IN LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

Covers issues related to language and linguistics. Topics may include language and film/literature/pop culture, endangered languages, speech synthesis, applied linguistics, or other topics determined by instructor. May be repeated for credit when content changes. No prerequisites.

LING 3311. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTIC SCIENCE. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the field of linguistics, the systematic study of human language. Drawing on data from a range of languages, it will examine the sound patterns of language (phonetics and phonology), words and word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics), and language in context (pragmatics). Emphasis will be placed on methods of linguistic analysis to solve problems in phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Additional topics may include language acquisition; linguistic variation; and/or historical/comparative linguistics.

LING 3330. PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Human speech sounds from both physiological and cognitive perspectives; the range of speech sounds in language and the patterning of such sounds within particular language systems. Prerequisite: LING 3311.

LING 3340. SYNTAX I. 3 Hours.

An introduction to syntactic investigation, developed primarily through the study of central aspects of English syntax. A major purpose is to introduce students to the study of language as an empirical science. Prerequisite: LING 3311.

LING 3345. CRITICAL REASONING IN LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

A survey of formal logical approaches used to describe and explain natural language phenomena. Topics include the fundamentals of logical representation and argumentation, the effective use of inductive and deductive reasoning, and the construction of more complex linguistic arguments. Prerequisites: LING 3311 and either PHIL 1301 or PHIL 3321.

LING 3366. TOPICS IN RACE/ETHNICITY AND LANGUAGE IN THE U.S.. 3 Hours.

Either an intensive focus within one racial/ethnic group or a comparison between two or more groups. Focus may include language in the U.S. as it pertains to one (or more) of these communities: African Americans, Mexican Americans and Latinos/as, Native Americans, and/or Asian Americans. May be repeated for credit as course content changes.

LING 4301. PHONOLOGICAL THEORY I. 3 Hours.

An investigation into the principles governing sound systems in human languages. Prerequisite: LING 3330.

LING 4303. SYNTAX II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of LING 3340, which explores further aspects of English syntax; universal and language-particular constraints on syntactic structure and rules. Further development and extensions of the generative approach to syntactic investigation. Prerequisite: LING 3340.

LING 4317. SOCIOLINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

Language in its social context, including linguistic variation, address and reference, speech levels, bilingualism, code switching, speech acts, conversation analysis, and language and gender. Prerequisite: LING 3311.

LING 4318. LANGUAGE AND GENDER. 3 Hours.

The role of language in the expression and creation of gender identities. Gender differences in language structure and use, women's and men's language in other cultures, the acquisition of gendered ways of speaking, and sexism in language. Offered as LING 4318 and WOMS 4318; formerly offered as LING 4392/WOMS 4392; credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite: LING 3311.

LING 4320. HISTORICAL AND COMPARATIVE LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

(Also taught as LING 5314). Language development and change; the comparative method and its use in linguistic reconstruction; laws of language change. Prerequisite: LING 3311.

LING 4326. BILINGUALISM. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to issues related to bilinguals and bilingualism. The areas that will be covered include different types of bilinguals/bilingualism, bilingual education, the cognitive benefits or disadvantages of being a bilingual, and language processing in bilinguals. Prerequisite: LING 3311.

LING 4327. SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on second language acquisition. Topics include the similarities and differences between first and second language acquisition, perception and production in native and non-native languages, and the implications of second language acquisition and processing research for theoretical linguistics and language teaching. Prerequisite: LING 2301, LING 2371, or LING 3311.

LING 4328. PSYCHOLINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

This course will introduce students to psycholinguistics, or the study of the cognitive processes involved in the acquisition, comprehension, and production of language. The class will focus mainly on language perception and production by native speakers, but will also address issues related to bilingual/second language processing. Prerequisite: LING 3311.

LING 4330. CORPUS LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

Applications of ways in which computer science and linguistics inform each other. Corpus linguistics focuses on how computers can be used to both obtain the data that we examine and to provide the tools we use for analysis. Includes readings, practical experience with several different software programs, and using sources of online corpora. Prerequisite: LING 3311.

LING 4334. MORPHOLOGY. 3 Hours.

A theoretical and typological investigation into the nature of word-structure and word-formation processes in human languages. Prerequisite: LING 4301 or LING 4303.

LING 4335. LANGUAGE UNIVERSALS & LINGUISTIC TYPOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Consideration of universals in human language, their explanation and description, and language types. Prerequisite: LING 4301.

LING 4345. SEMANTICS. 3 Hours.

Introduction to meaning at the lexical level. Topics may include ways of describing meaning (sense and reference, componential analysis and prototype theory), organizing meaning (the mental lexicon, connotation and euphemism, linguistic relativity), and applying these concepts to sort predicates by argument structure patterns. Prerequisite: LING 3311.

LING 4347. PRAGMATICS. 3 Hours.

Analysis of how context and form interact with meaning. Topics may include deixis, reference, speech acts, presupposition, implicature, information structure and intonation. Prerequisite: LING 3311.

LING 4353. TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND OR FOREIGN LANGUAGE. 3 Hours.

Presentation and critique of methodologies of teaching English to speakers of other languages, with emphasis on teaching techniques of aural comprehension; speaking, reading, and writing skills; testing, language laboratory, and linguistic-cultural differences.

LING 4354. METHODS AND MATERIALS TO TEACH ENGLISH AS A SECOND OR FOREIGN LANGUAGE. 3 Hours.

Systematic study of how to teach English to second/foreign language learners. Topics covered include the teaching of grammar, vocabulary, reading, writing, pronunciation, speaking, and listening. Prerequisite: LING 2301 or LING 2371; LING 4353.

LING 4360. NON-WESTERN LINGUISTIC STRUCTURES. 3 Hours.

Study of a selected non-Western language, language family or language area based on descriptive linguistic analysis. May be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Prerequisite: LING 3330 and LING 3340.

LING 4362. LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION. 3 Hours.

The course discusses fundamental issues that are part of language documenting and description. These include project design, research ethics and intellectual property, researcher and community rights and responsibilities, world language ecology, technology and software, archiving issues, grant-writing fundamentals, and related issues that form best practices for language documentation projects. (Also offered as LING 5362. Credit will be granted only once for LING 4362 or LING 5362.) Prerequisite: LING 3311.

LING 4363. LANGUAGE ENDANGERMENT AND REVITALIZATION. 3 Hours.

This course examines language endangerment and what it means for a language to become endangered, and studies language revitalization. Case studies are presented where communities seek to maintain the number of speakers or revive the language. (Also offered as LING 5363.Credit will be granted only once for LING 4363 or LING 5363.) Prerequisite: LING 3311.

LING 4370. HISTORY OF LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

Surveys the recent history of the field of linguistics and familiarizes students with the key figures and theories in recent linguistic history, with special attention to the development and emergence of generative theories of syntax, semantics, and phonology. Prerequisite: LING 3330 and LING 3340 and either LING 4301 or LING 4303.

LING 4389. TOPICS IN LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

Current topics in linguistics research. May be repeated if topic changes. Prerequisite: Either LING 3330, LING 3340, or LING 4317, and permission of undergraduate advisor.

LING 4391. CONFERENCE COURSE IN LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

Independent study in the preparation of a paper on a research topic; consultation with instructor on a regular basis. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Either LING 3311, LING 3330, or LING 3340, and permission of undergraduate advisor.

LING 4393. INTERNSHIP IN LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

Internship (paid or unpaid) in Linguistics, supervised by a faculty internship coordinator, with the student performing duties related to the academic curriculum of Linguistics. Students are required to perform and report on designated career-related duties in a professional environment and submit assignments related to the work performed. May be repeated with the approval of the Undergraduate Advisor. May be repeated for credit once, as internship experience changes. Prerequisite: LING 3311 and permission of the instructor.

LING 4394. LING 4394 HONORS THESIS/SENIOR PROJECT. 3 Hours.

Required of all students in the University Honors College. During the senior year, the student must complete a thesis or project of equivalent difficulty under the direction of a faculty member in the major department. Approval of instructor required.

LING 4395. INTERNSHIP IN TESOL. 3 Hours.

Internship (paid or unpaid) in TESOL, supervised by a faculty internship coordinator, with the student performing duties related to the academic curriculum of TESOL and/or the application of this knowledge. Students are required to perform significant teaching-related duties in an ESL/EFL environment and submit assignments related to the work performed. May be repeated with the approval of the Undergraduate Advisor, as internship experience changes. Prerequisite: LING 4353 and LING 4354 (may be concurrently enrolled in 4354).

LING 5100. THESIS WRITING SEMINAR. 1 Hour.

Techniques for researching and writing a thesis/dissertation in linguistics. Required of all students who have elected the Thesis or Thesis Substitute degree option in Linguistics. Prerequisite: completion of at least 9 hours of LING courses.

LING 5110. TESOL PRACTICUM. 1 Hour.

In this class, students will apply the principles presented in the TESOL Certificate coursework through observing and teaching ESOL classes. Prerequisite: Permission of adviser.

LING 5190. CONFERENCE COURSE IN LINGUISTICS. 1 Hour.

Graded P/F. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

LING 5300. LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the field of linguistics, the systematic study of human language. Drawing on data from a range of languages, it will examine the sound patterns of language (phonetics and phonology), words and word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics), and language in context (pragmatics). Emphasis will be placed on methods of linguistic analysis to solve problems in phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. May be repeated for credit as the focus of the course or instructor changes. May not be used to fulfill Ph.D. degree requirements in linguistics.

LING 5301. INTRO TO COMMUNICATIVE LANGUAGE TEACHING. 3 Hours.

Presentation and critique of methodologies of teaching English to speakers of other languages, with emphasis on techniques of teaching aural comprehension; speaking, reading, and writing skills; attention to testing, language laboratory, and linguistic-cultural differences. Course includes a practical teaching requirement.

LING 5302. METHODS IN TEACHING READING AND WRITING. 3 Hours.

This course is an in-depth study of how to design ESL/EFL reading and writing classes and how to create instruction and assessment materials for these classes based on sound pedagogical principles.

LING 5303. CONTRASTIVE ANALYSIS AND ERROR ANALYSIS IN THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH AS A SECOND OR FOREIGN LANGUAGE. 3 Hours.

A study of contrastive analysis and error analysis as means of defining student problems and progress; emphasis on current research; application to specific problems and contexts. Prerequisite: LING 5300 and LING 5301.

LING 5304. PEDAGOGICAL GRAMMAR OF ENGLISH. 3 Hours.

This course is a study of English sentence structure. Topics include article use, phrase structure, verb tense, agreement, pronouns, question forms, and embedded clauses. The course will focus on the second-language acquisition and processing of these structures as well as on ways that they can be addressed during ES/FL grammar instruction. Prerequisite: LING 5300; LING 5301 or LING 5302.

LING 5305. SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION. 3 Hours.

This course is the study of the processes of first and second language acquisition, their similarities and differences, language disorders, language perception and production, and implications of language acquisition research for linguistic theory and language teaching. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: LING 5300 or permission of instructor.

LING 5306. TESOL CURRICULUM DESIGN. 3 Hours.

Systematic presentation of elements in development, management and evaluation of TESOL programs. Attention to needs analysis, syllabus design, materials selection and adaptation, teaching and evaluation in language curriculum design. Prerequisite: LING 5301.

LING 5307. PEDAGOGICAL PHONOLOGY OF ENGLISH. 3 Hours.

A study of the sound system of English. Topics include segmental phonemes, stress, length, intonation and variation at the lexical and utterance levels. Application to teaching English as a second or foreign language. Problems of description; means of application; adaptation to current pedagogical methods. Prerequisite: LING 5300; LING 5301 or LING 5302.

LING 5308. LANGUAGE ASSESSMENT. 3 Hours.

This is an introductory testing course. Topics will include different types of language assessment, issues related to language testing, measurement and evaluation of achievement and proficiency in a second language, and developing language tests of various language skills. Prerequisite: LING 5301, LING 5302, or permission of the instructor.

LING 5310. SOCIOLINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

The study of language and social context (made up of society and individuals). Content includes language as a social phenomenon, theoretical perspectives on relationship between language, society and individuals, basic concepts in sociolinguistics; and may include topics in macro- and micro-sociolinguistics such as multilingualism, language planning and standardization, linguistic variation, code switching, conversational analysis, and language and gender. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

LING 5311. SOCIOLINGUISTICS OF SOCIETY. 3 Hours.

The study of macro-sociolinguistics, including topics such as multilingualism, language standardization and planning, literacy, language dominance, maintenance and death, language and identity, diglossia, and pidgins and creoles. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: LING 5310.

LING 5312. LANGUAGE AND GENDER. 3 Hours.

The role of language in the expression and creation of gender identities. Gender differences in language structure and use, men's and women's languages in other cultures, the acquisition of gendered ways of speaking, and sexism in language. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: LING 5310.

LING 5313. TOPICS IN SOCIOLINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

Selected topics relating the scientific methodologies of linguistics to larger concerns of society and culture including cognition, motivation, description and analysis. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: LING 5310.

LING 5314. HISTORICAL AND COMPARATIVE LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

The study of language development and change; comparative method and its use in linguistic reconstruction; laws of language change. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: LING 3330 or permission of instructor.

LING 5320. PHONOLOGICAL THEORY. 3 Hours.

LING 5320 is a foundations course for the study of the principles that govern sound systems in human languages. Students will work with sound patterns from a variety of languages in order to understand the fundamental aspects of phonological phenomena, and course assignments will require application of the descriptive and theoretical tools in working with sound pattern data. Lectures will further develop this description, analysis, and argumentation for phonological data. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Permission of Advisor.

LING 5321. ADVANCED PHONOLOGICAL THEORY. 3 Hours.

A continuation of LING 5320. Topics include autosegmental analysis, lexical phonology, metrical phonology and phonological feature geometry. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: LING 5320.

LING 5322. LABORATORY PHONOLOGY. 3 Hours.

An investigation into the physical properties of human speech. Students will gain hands-on experience with computer-assisted speech analysis. No prior computer experience is assumed. Prerequisite: LING 5320.

LING 5326. BILINGUALISM. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to issues related to bilinguals and bilingualism. The areas that will be covered include different types of bilinguals/bilingualism, bilingual education, the cognitive benefits (or disadvantages) of being a bilingual, and language processing in bilinguals. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: LING 5300.

LING 5328. PSYCHOLINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

This course will introduce students to psycholinguistics, or the study of the cognitive processes involved in the acquisition, comprehension, and production of language. The class will focus mainly on language perception and production by native speakers, but will also address issues related to bilingual/second language processing. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: LING 5300.

LING 5330. FORMAL SYNTAX. 3 Hours.

Introduction to syntactic theory. Major topics include phrase structure, subcategorization, lexical entries, and passive and infinitival constructions. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Permission of advisor.

LING 5331. ADVANCED FORMAL SYNTAX. 3 Hours.

Continuation of LING 5330. Topics may include the syntax of unbounded dependencies, constraints on extraction, unbounded versus successive cyclic movement, and the licensing of gaps. May be repeated for credit as the topics change. Prerequisite: LING 5330.

LING 5334. MORPHOLOGY. 3 Hours.

A theoretical and typological investigation into the nature of word-structure and word-formation processes in human languages. May be repeated for credit as the topics of focus change. Prerequisite: LING 5320 or LING 5330.

LING 5335. LANGUAGE UNIVERSALS AND LINGUISTIC TYPOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Consideration of universals in human language, their explanation and description, and language types. May be repeated for credit as the topics of focus change. Prerequisite: LING 5330.

LING 5345. SEMANTICS. 3 Hours.

Graduate-level introduction to formal semantics, designed to prepare students for research with basic tools in Model-theoretic semantics and compositionality, including core topics such as negation, quantification, mood and modality, noun phrases, indefinites, definiteness, tense, aspect, and events, from a semantic and cross-linguistic perspective. May be repeated for credit as the topics of focus change. Prerequisite: LING 3340 or permission of instructor.

LING 5346. TOPICS IN APPLIED LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

This is a special topics course in Applied Linguistics. Topics may change semester-by-semester, based on instructor and other factors; may be repeated for credit as the topics of focus change.

LING 5347. PRAGMATICS. 3 Hours.

Analysis of how context and form interact with meaning. Topics may include deixis, reference, speech acts, presupposition, implicature, information structure and intonation. May be repeated for credit as the topics of focus change.

LING 5350. TEXT ANALYSIS. 3 Hours.

Methods of charting and analyzing texts to reveal the systematic contributions of pragmatic choices to their organization and meaning. May be repeated for credit as the topics of focus change. Prerequisite: LING 3340.

LING 5360. NON-WESTERN LINGUISTIC STRUCTURES. 3 Hours.

Study of a selected non-Western language, language family or language area based on descriptive linguistic analysis. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Prerequisite: LING 3330 and LING 3340.

LING 5361. READINGS IN NON-WESTERN LINGUISTIC STRUCTURES. 3 Hours.

Readings in the linguistic structures of non-Western languages. Enrollment in the course is not sufficient to fulfill the non-Western language requirement. May be repeated for credit as the readings and topics of focus change.

LING 5362. LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION. 3 Hours.

The course discusses fundamental issues that are part of language documenting and description. These include project design, research ethics and intellectual property, researcher and community rights and responsibilities, world language ecology, technology and software, archiving issues, grant-writing fundamentals, and related issues that form best practices for language documentation projects. May be repeated for credit as the topics of focus change. Prerequisite: LING 5300.

LING 5363. LANGUAGE ENDANGERMENT AND REVITALIZATION. 3 Hours.

This course examines language endangerment and what it means for a language to become endangered, and studies language revitalization. Case studies are presented where communities seek to maintain the number of speakers or revive the language. May be repeated for credit as the topics of focus change. Prerequisite: LING 5300.

LING 5370. HISTORY OF LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

Surveys the recent history of the field of linguistics and familiarizes students with the key figures and theories in recent linguistic history, with special attention to the development and emergence of key generative theories such as those of syntax, semantics, and phonology. May be repeated for credit as the topics of focus change. Prerequisite: LING 5320 or LING 5330.

LING 5371. SURVEY OF THEORIES IN APPLIED LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

A comparison and contrast of various linguistic theories, with consideration of their implications for application to real-world problems involving language. May be repeated for credit as the topics of focus change. Prerequisite: LING 5305.

LING 5372. READINGS IN LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

Readings in linguistics, tailored to student's areas of interest and instructor's expertise. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: LING 5330.

LING 5380. FIELD METHODS. 3 Hours.

The principles, techniques and practical aspects of linguistic field research. The course includes extensive practice in eliciting data (phonological, morpho-syntactic, textual and lexical) directly from a native speaker, as well as in managing, analyzing and describing the data obtained. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: LING 5300. Permission of the Graduate Advisor.

LING 5381. CORPUS LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

Applications of ways in which computer science and linguistics inform each other. Corpus linguistics focuses on how computers can be used to both obtain the data that we examine and to provide the tools we use for analysis. Includes readings, practical experience with several different software programs, and using sources of online corpora. May be repeated for credit as the topics of focus change.

LING 5391. CONFERENCE COURSE IN LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

LING 5392. THESIS SUBSTITUTE. 3 Hours.

LING 5393. TESOL TEACHING AND OBSERVATION. 3 Hours.

In this course, students will work regularly and consistently with an organization where English is taught. Students will observe, teach, guide, and participate in activities in order to demonstrate ability to apply the principles of Communicative Language Teaching in an English Language Learning environment. Prerequisite: LING 5302; LING 5305.

LING 5395. GRADUATE INTERNSHIP. 3 Hours.

Employment (paid or unpaid) supervised by a faculty internship coordinator, with the student performing duties related to the academic curriculum of linguistics and/or TESOL. Students are required to submit an approved academic project related to the work performed. May be repeated with approval of Graduate Advisor.

LING 5398. THESIS. 3 Hours.

LING 5698. THESIS. 6 Hours.

LING 5998. THESIS. 9 Hours.

LING 6191. RESEARCH IN LINGUISTICS. 1 Hour.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

LING 6199. DISSERTATION. 1 Hour.

LING 6291. RESEARCH IN LINGUISTICS. 2 Hours.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

LING 6300. PROFESSIONAL WRITING SEMINAR. 3 Hours.

Workshop in producing the writing genres expected of professional academic linguists. May be repeated for credit as the topics of focus change. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 9 hours of graduate LING courses.

LING 6360. DISCOURSE THEORY SEMINAR. 3 Hours.

Seminar on the theory of discourse in linguistics. May be repeated for credit as the instructor and topics of focus change. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

LING 6380. FIELD METHODS SEMINAR. 3 Hours.

Second part of field methods sequence. May be repeated for credit as the student's topic of focus changes. Prerequisite: LING 5380.

LING 6381. STATISTICS FOR LINGUISTS. 3 Hours.

In this course, students learn the fundamentals of quantitative research in linguistics and language-related fields. Students learn how to develop viable research hypotheses, how to collect and manage the data necessary to evaluate these hypotheses, and how to analyze data using standard statistical tests. May be repeated for credit as the topics of focus change.

LING 6390. LINGUISTICS SEMINAR. 3 Hours.

Seminar in linguistics. Course may be repeated for credit when topic or instructor changes. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

LING 6391. RESEARCH IN LINGUISTICS. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

LING 6392. SEMINAR IN PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGY. 3 Hours.

In-depth investigation of research into a specialized area of phonetics and/or phonology. Course registrants will develop original research focusing on topic at-hand, with results exchanged through discussion, presentations/reports, and/or papers. Prerequisites: LING 5321 or permission of the instructor.

LING 6393. SEMINAR IN SYNTAX. 3 Hours.

In-depth investigation of research into a specialized area of syntax. Course registrants will develop original research focusing on topic at-hand, with results exchanged through discussion, presentations/reports, and/or papers. Prerequisites: LING 5331 or permission of instructor.

LING 6394. SEMINAR IN SEMANTICS AND PRAGMATICS. 3 Hours.

In-depth investigation of research into a specialized area of meaning: semantics and/or pragmatics. Course registrants will develop original research focusing on topic at-hand, with results exchanged through discussion, presentations/reports, and/or papers. Prerequisites: LING 5345 or LING 5347 or permission of instructor.

LING 6395. SEMINAR IN SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION. 3 Hours.

In-depth investigation of research into a specialized area of second language acquisition. Course registrants will develop original research focusing on topic at-hand, with results exchanged through discussion, presentations/reports, and/or papers. Prerequisites: LING 5305 or permission of the instructor.

LING 6399. DISSERTATION. 3 Hours.

LING 6491. RESEARCH IN LINGUISTICS. 4 Hours.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

LING 6591. RESEARCH IN LINGUISTICS. 5 Hours.

LING 6691. RESEARCH IN LINGUISTICS. 6 Hours.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

LING 6699. DISSERTATION. 6 Hours.

LING 6999. DISSERTATION. 9 Hours.

LING 7399. DOCTORAL DEGREE COMPLETION. 3 Hours.

This course may be taken during the semester in which a student expects to complete all requirements for the doctoral degree and graduate. Enrolling in this course meets minimum enrollment requirements for graduation, for holding fellowships awarded by The Office of Graduate Studies and for full-time GTA or GRA positions. Students should verify that enrollment in this course meets other applicable enrollment requirements. To remain eligible in their final semester of study for grants, loans or other forms of financial aid administered by the Financial Aid Office must enroll in a minimum of 5 hours as required by the Office of Financial Aid. Other funding sources may also require more than 3-hours of enrollment. Additional hours may also be required to meet to requirements set by immigration law or by the policies of the student's degree program. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office, other sources of funding, Office of International Education and/or their graduate advisor to verify enrollment requirements before registering for this course. This course may only be taken once and may not be repeated. Students who do not complete all graduation requirements while enrolled in this course must enroll in a minimum of 6 dissertation hours (6699 or 6999) in their graduation term. Graded P/F/R.