Engineering (ENGR)

Courses

ENGR 1099. UNDERGRADUATE INDEPENDENT STUDY. 0 Hours.

Independent study related to Engineering.

ENGR 1199. ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING BRIDGE. 1 Hour.

Expanding on prior knowledge of engineering topics, this course enhances problem solving skills in preparation for subsequent engineering courses. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

ENGR 1204. ENGINEERING FIRST YEAR SEMINAR. 2 Hours.

Introduction to basic engineering concepts, engineering and its many subfields, ethical responsibilities, creativity and design. Self-management and academic skills necessary for academic and professional success.

ENGR 1300. ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING. 3 Hours.

Broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through the process of applying the principles of mathematics to solve real-life engineering problems and technical writing assignments. Math topics are presented within the context of engineering applications and reinforced through examples from engineering courses. Also introduces algorithm development through the use of the engineering analysis software MATLAB. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1421 (or concurrent enrollment), or C or better in (or concurrent enrollment in) a subsequent mathematics course (MATH 1426, MATH 2425, MATH 2326, MATH 3319, HONR-SC 1426, HONR-SC 2425), or a qualifying score on the Math Placement Test (MPT).

ENGR 1301. Bench Work. 1 Hour.

ENGR 2100. SUPERVISED ENGINEERING WORK EXPERIENCE. 1 Hour.

Course is for cooperative education students in engineering to be taken in the semester or summer they are employed. Each student will prepare a technical report based upon their work experience. Students who complete the cooperative program will receive certificates and this will be entered on their transcript. Prerequisite: acceptance into and continuance in the Engineering Cooperative Education Program. May be repeated.

ENGR 2300. INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE ENGINEERING. 3 Hours.

Introduction to key sustainability concepts and the role of engineering in sustainability. The engineering design process and consideration of sustainability. Use of life cycle assessment to quantify environmental and economic impacts of various design alternatives. Case study project. Prerequisite: MATH 2425.

ENGR 3000. SUPERVISED ENGINEERING WORK EXPERIENCE. 0 Hours.

Course is for cooperative education students in engineering to be taken in the semester or summer they are employed. Each student will prepare a technical report based upon their work experience. Students who complete the cooperative program will receive certificates and this will be entered on their transcript. Prerequisite: acceptance into and continuance in the Engineering Cooperative Education Program. May be repeated.

ENGR 3100. SUPERVISED ENGINEERING WORK EXPERIENCE. 1 Hour.

Course is for cooperative education students in engineering to be taken in the semester or summer they are employed. Each student will prepare a technical report based upon their work experience. Students who complete the cooperative program will receive certificates and this will be entered on their transcript. Prerequisite: acceptance into and continuance in the Engineering Cooperative Education Program. May be repeated.

ENGR 4100. SUPERVISED ENGINEERING WORK EXPERIENCE. 1 Hour.

Course is for cooperative education students in engineering to be taken in the semester or summer they are employed. Each student will prepare a technical report based upon their work experience. Students who complete the cooperative program will receive certificates and this will be entered on their transcript. Prerequisite: acceptance into and continuance in the Engineering Cooperative Education Program. May be repeated.

ENGR 4102. ENGINEERING ENTREPRENEURSHIP. 1 Hour.

Topics include special problems of newly formed firms, planning, start-up business considerations, business strategy, management basics, and business plan design. Students will engage in business and entrepreneurship training, become aware of basic business operations, and learn about inventions, intellectual property, licensing, the patenting process and international patenting, as well as high-tech marketing. Opportunities in university environments will be discussed including incubation centers and patent licensing. Other topics include papers, legal issues, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) proposal design, SBIR funding from National Science Foundation (NSF), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and others, the review process, reporting, local high-tech business accelerators, venture plans, and venture capital. Classes will feature lectures from College of Engineering and College of Business faculty, and experts from industry.

ENGR 4302. ENGINEERING ENTREPRENEURSHIP. 3 Hours.

Topics include special problems of newly formed firms, planning, start-up business considerations, business strategy, management basics, and business plan design. Students will engage in business and entrepreneurship training or discussion, become aware of basic business operations, and learn about inventions, intellectual property, and the patenting process. Other topics include assessment of possible markets, venture feasibility, teambuilding, and leadership. Opportunities in university environments will be discussed including incubation centers and patent licensing. We address legal issues, SBIR proposal design, SBIR funding from NSF, NIH, and others, the review process, reporting, local high-tech business accelerators, venture plans, and venture capital. Course taught as EE 4302, ENGR 4302 and ENGR 5302; credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite: Student must be in an engineering professional program.

ENGR 4391. INTRODUCTION TO UNMANNED VEHICLE SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

Introduction to unmanned (aerial, ground, surface and underwater) vehicular systems (Unmanned Vehicles Systems), their history, missions, capabilities, types, configurations, subsystems, and the disciplines needed for UVS development and operation. Application through interdisciplinary team projects pertaining to development of UVS. This course is team-taught by faculty from various engineering departments. Prerequisite: Junior standing (60 or more hours) and admission to a professional engineering program.

ENGR 4392. UNMANNED VEHICLE SYSTEMS DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. 3 Hours.

A Team engineering approach to a UVS design project that integrates engineering knowledge from several courses. Problem definition and creative synthesis of prospective design solutions. Engineering proposals, feasibility studies, trade-off studies, systems models and analysis, decision making, and engineering reports and presentations. The design of a UVS is finalized, a physical model (prototype) is manufactured and tested. Redesign and retest is accomplished as desired. The final design is documented by written report and oral presentation. Prerequisite: Junior standing (60 or more hours) and admission into the professional program.

ENGR 4395. SUSTAINABLE ENGINEERING DESIGN PROJECT. 3 Hours.

This course provides an open-ended design experience. Planning, analysis of alternatives, and design of selected projects that cross various engineering disciplines, and include multiple realistic constraints. Students will use life cycle assessment to quantify environmental and economic impacts of various design alternatives. They will also identify trade-offs among social, economic, and environmental drivers. A team approach is emphasized. Prerequisites: ENGR 2300, IE 3315, ECON 2305 or IE 2308, societal context elective.

ENGR 5102. ENGINEERING ENTREPRENEURSHIP. 1 Hour.

Topics include special problems of newly formed firms, planning, start-up business considerations, business strategy, management basics, and business plan design. Students will engage in business and entrepreneurship training, become aware of basic business operations, and learn about inventions, intellectual property, licensing, the patenting process and international patenting, as well as high-tech marketing. Opportunities in university environments will be discussed including incubation centers and patent licensing. Other topics include papers, legal issues, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) proposal design, SBIR funding from National Science Foundation (NSF), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and others, the review process, reporting, local high-tech business accelerators, venture plans, and venture capital. Classes will feature lectures from College of Engineering and College of Business faculty, and experts from industry.

ENGR 5302. ENGINEERING ENTREPRENEURSHIP. 3 Hours.

Topics include special problems of newly formed firms, planning, start-up business considerations, business strategy, management basics, and business plan design. Students will engage in business and entrepreneurship training or discussion, become aware of basic business operations, and learn about inventions, intellectual property, and the patenting process. Other topics include assessment of possible markets, venture feasibility, teambuilding, and leadership. Opportunities in university environments will be discussed including incubation centers and patent licensing. We address legal issues, SBIR proposal design, SBIR funding from NSF, NIH, and others, the review process, reporting, local high-tech business accelerators, venture plans, and venture capital.