Bachelor of Science in Construction Management

Undergraduate Programs

The following sections apply to each student majoring in any undergraduate program housed in the Civil Engineering Department: Architectural Engineering, Civil Engineering, and Construction Management. In these sections, "program" refers to any of these programs and "student" refers to any student (UCOL, Intended, or Professional Program) majoring in any one of these programs.

Refer to the College of Engineering section of this catalog for additional information concerning the following topics: Admission to the College of Engineering, Advising, Admission into the Professional Program, College of Engineering Academic Regulations, Honors Degrees in Engineering, Professional Engineering Licensure, and Cooperative Education.

Admission Requirements

Admission as an Architectural Engineering major, a Civil Engineering major, or a Construction Management major is subject to the relevant requirements and policies of the University of Texas at Arlington and of the UTA College of Engineering.  The Civil Engineering Department does not impose additional requirements.

Transfer Credit

When a student transfers, a loss of credit can occur that may require change in academic plans. A course, that appears to be similar, may be different in either content or level of difficulty and, as a result, cannot be used for degree credit. Another course may have no equivalent in a particular degree plan. More than one transferred course may satisfy a degree requirement when only one is required. The UTA Civil Engineering Department encourages students interested in our programs to make early contact with our advisors so that we can help avoid these problems.

A student must earn a grade of C or better for a course to be transferred.  Any course that is offered under the Texas Common Course Numbering system is accepted as equivalent to the corresponding UTA course.  It is the responsibility of the student to establish the equivalence of any other course or courses to a course required in a program. The student should be prepared to provide a syllabus or similar documents to establish equivalence. To be acceptable as equivalent, at a minimum, a transferred course must have no less credit value than the corresponding course and contain substantially equivalent course content. To be accepted in transfer, junior and senior level courses must be taken at a college or university with the same accreditation as UTA in the area offering the course. For example, a Civil Engineering course must come from an ABET accredited Civil Engineering program.

When a student's record or performance indicates weakness in certain areas of study, they may be required to retake courses or to take additional courses.

Before enrolling in a course at another institution to transfer for credit toward a program degree, a student should consult with a program advisor to verify that the course can be used in the student's degree plan and to obtain the necessary written permission.

Advising

Academic advisement is required for every undergraduate student before class enrollment each semester.

A new student with fewer than 24 hours of transferrable credit, including any student entering directly from high school, is advised in the University Advising Center of University College. After one or more semesters and sufficient progress in the degree program, this student is released by the University Advising Center to the program advisors.

Prior to enrollment, a new student with 24 or more hours of transferrable credit must make an appointment with the transfer advisor of their program. However, if all of the student's transfer credit was earned at a Texas community college, an appointment may be scheduled with any advisor for their program. The advising appointment should be scheduled as soon as possible after admission, but certainly prior to registration. A transfer student should not make an advising appointment with a transfer advisor after the initial evaluation of their transfer credit is complete.

During each long semester, a specified period is set aside for the academic advisement of continuing students. Each continuing student is responsible for meeting with their program advisor during this advising period. Continuing students will receive instructions prior to each advising period related to preparing for and making an advising appointment. Academic advising will be available at other times but a student who does not meet with their program advisor during the regular advising period may have fewer alternatives when selecting courses.

Academic Rules, Regulations, and Policies

In addition to the rules, regulations, and policies established below and in the individual program sections, each student is subject to the rules, regulations, and policies of the University of Texas at Arlington and of the UTA College of Engineering. Each student should become familiar with these. The rules, regulations, and policies of the University of Texas at Arlington and of the UTA College of Engineering are set forth in other sections of this catalog. It is the responsibility of each student to follow the applicable published rules. Failure to follow these rules may be grounds for dismissal from the program.

CE DEPARTMENT COURSE REQUISITES

  • A student must have the written approval of their program advisor to register for any course that will satisfy a requirement of their degree program.
  • A student must have specific written permission of their program advisor to register at a different institution for any course that will satisfy a requirement of their degree program.
  • A student may not attempt a CE Department course without satisfying all current requisite requirements. A prerequisite course requirement is satisfied by earning a grade of C or better. A co-requisite course requirement is satisfied by earning a grade of C or better or by concurrent enrollment in the course at UTA.
  • A student may not drop a course which is co-requisite to a CE Department course without also dropping the CE Department course.
  • No professional program courses may be attempted until the student is admitted into the professional program or obtains the written permission of the Department Chair.
  • No 4000 level professional program courses may be attempted until the student is admitted into the professional program.

REPEATING COURSES

A student may not attempt any course more than three times and apply that course toward a program degree. Enrollment in a course for a period of time sufficient for assignment of a grade, including a grade of W, is considered an attempt.

aDMISSION TO THE PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM

Requirements for admission to the professional program in each program are in accordance with those of the College of Engineering with the following added stipulations:

  • Application to the professional program is to be made to the CE Department during the semester that the advancement requirements are being completed.
  • Each student must complete all pre-professional courses stipulated under "Requirements for a Bachelor of Science Degree in" the program with a minimum grade of C in each course and a minimum GPA of 2.25 in: a) all courses, b) in all math, science, and engineering courses, and c) in all program specific courses.
  • Upon receipt of the application, a student's record is individually reviewed including grades, academic and personal integrity, record of drops and course withdrawals, the order in which courses have been taken, the number of times a student has attempted a course for credit, and any other aspect of the student's record that may be deemed pertinent to admission.

The student must be admitted to the professional program and have an approved degree plan on file in order to graduate. The degree plan is generated upon entry to the professional program. Graduating seniors should apply to graduate during the next-to-last semester.

GROUNDS FOR DISMISSAL FROM THE CE PROGRAM

A student whom the UTA Office of Student Conduct has found to have violated the UTA Code of Student Conduct a second time is subject to dismissal from the CE program.

Minor Field of Study

The Civil Engineering Department does not support the option of pursuing a minor in Architectural Engineering, in Civil Engineering, or in Construction Management by other engineering or non-engineering majors. 

Educational and Professional Career Paths

The construction industry is one of the largest industries in the world, based on either employment or expenditure.  A responsible position in construction management requires the ability to apply principles from business, mathematics, science, and engineering to construction projects in a wide variety of nature, type, and scope. Construction managers plan, construct, maintain, and manage facilities essential to modern, civilized human life. Projects requiring construction management expertise include buildings, bridges, tunnels, transportation systems, and facilities utilized in various specialized industrial processes.

Construction management graduates are prepared for advanced graduate degrees and a wide range of career paths in areas including consulting, governmental agencies, and industry. In addition to the traditional careers in construction management, graduates may take advantage of their strong, broad based education to pursue careers in professions such as law, business, or teaching.

Construction Management BS Degree at UT Arlington

At the undergraduate level, the department offers a Bachelor of Science in Construction Management degree designed to provide the necessary foundation in business, science, mathematics, and engineering required for the management of construction projects of all sizes. The program will also instill an understanding of the importance of ethics, safety, professionalism, and socioeconomic concerns in resolving technical problems through synthesis, planning, and design.

The Civil Engineering Department will seek accreditation by the Applied Science Accreditation Commission of ABET (www.abet.org) and the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE) (www.acce-hq.org). The Construction Management program is housed in the Civil Engineering Department.

Educational Objectives of the Undergraduate Program

Most alumni of the CM program will attain the following Program Educational Objectives (PEOs) within a few years after graduation:

  •  Obtain a responsible position involving elements from estimating, planning, scheduling, design, and management of construction projects using skills developed in business, science, mathematics, and engineering.
  • Be involved in continuing education and professional development activities.

Student Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program

In order to produce graduates who will achieve the Program Educational Objectives a few years after graduation, it is expected that the undergraduate students will attain the following Student Outcomes by the time of graduation:

  •  an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and applied sciences
  • an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • an ability to formulate or design a system, process, or program to meet desired needs considering cost, schedule, and safety
  • an ability to participate in and manage multi-disciplinary teams
  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve applied science problems.
  • an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  • an ability to communicate effectively
  • the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context
  • a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  • a knowledge of contemporary issues
  • an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern scientific and technical tools necessary for professional practice

Requirements for a Bachelor of Science Degree in Construction Management

Courses Fulfilling the University General Core Requirements (minimum 42 hours required)44
Communication (minimum 6 hours required)
RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I
FUNDAMENTALS OF PUBLIC SPEAKING 1
Creative Arts (minimum 3 hours required)
INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN
Government/Political Science (minimum 6 hours required)
GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES
STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT
Language, Philosophy & Culture (minimum 3 hours required)
CONTEMPORARY MORAL PROBLEMS
Mathematics (minimum 6 hours required)
TRIGONOMETRY
ELEMENTARY STATISTICAL ANALYSIS
Life & Physical Sciences (minimum 6 hours required)
GENERAL COLLEGE PHYSICS I
GENERAL COLLEGE PHYSICS II
Social & Behavorial Sciences (minimum 3 hours required)
Select one of the following:
PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS
PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS
ECONOMICS OF SOCIAL ISSUES
MONEY, FINANCE AND THE MODERN CONSUMER
COMMUNICATIONS IN ORGANIZATIONS
US History (minimum 6 hours required)
HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1865
HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, 1865 TO PRESENT
Foundational Component Area Option (minimum 3 hours required)
Any additional course which satisfies the University Core Curriculum requirement in any area is accepted.
Pre-Professional Program Courses24
Of the core courses, ENGL 1301, COMS 1301, MATH 1303, MATH 1308, PHYS 1441, PHYS 1442, and any six SCH of the remaining 21 SCH are part of the CM Pre-Professional Program.
PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I
CONSTRUCTION DRAFTING
CONSTRUCTION SURVEYING
INTRODUCTION TO CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS AND METHODS
INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICS FOR CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS
Select one of the following:
COLLEGE ALGEBRA
COLLEGE ALGEBRA FOR ECONOMICS & BUSINESS ANALYSIS
CM Professional Program Courses52
MANAGING ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATING I
CONSTRUCTION LAW AND ETHICS
MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
CONSTRUCTION DESIGN I
SOILS AND FOUNDATION IN CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS
CONSTRUCTION SAFETY
CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAPSTONE I
CONSTRUCTION DESIGN II
CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATING II
CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULING
CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAPSTONE II
APPLIED STRUCTURAL SYSTEM DESIGN
Select four of the following:
BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING FOR CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF TEMPORARY STRUCTURES
SUSTAINABLE BUILDING PRACTICE
INTERNSHIP
Total Hours120
1

Completion of COMS 1301 FUNDAMENTALS OF PUBLIC SPEAKING satisfies the University's communication requirement.

More hours may be required to strengthen student's program or demonstrate proficiency. See Prior Preparation and Course Requirements.

Total hours will depend upon prior preparation and academic qualifications. Also, students who do not have two units of high school foreign language will be required to take modern and classical languages courses in addition to the previously listed requirements.

suggested course sequence

A suggested course sequence for the Pre-Professional (first two years) and Professional Program courses (final two years) is available on the CE Department’s web site. 

Prior Preparation and Course Requirements

The undergraduate baccalaureate degree in construction management is a four-year program and requirements for the degree are based upon prior high school preparation through either an honors or college track program. Students who have not had the appropriate prior preparation should contact the departmental advising office for a curriculum guide that will assist them in structuring a study plan that will include leveling courses. Students requiring leveling courses may require a period of time greater than four years to complete their undergraduate degree.

Courses

CM 1311. CONSTRUCTION DRAFTING. 3 Hours.

Introduction to computer aided drafting, using AutoCAD.

CM 1331. CONSTRUCTION SURVEYING. 3 Hours.

Introduction to surveying including distance measurement, corrections, leveling, measurement of angles and directions, traverse adjustment, volumes, cross section and area computations, and error theory. Methods and technologies such as Excel, MathCAD, global positioning system and geographic information systems used to manage data in surveying. Emphasis on the use of total stations. Prerequisite: CM 1311.

CM 2311. INTRODUCTION TO CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Characteristics of the construction industry; types of construction companies, contracts, people involved in a project, their responsibilities and interrelationships; ethical conduct; evolution of a project; interpreting working drawings; construction bonds; contract documents.

CM 2313. CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS AND METHODS. 3 Hours.

Materials, methods and sequences of the construction process; emphasis on design, specification, purchase and use of concrete, steel, masonry and wood. An understanding of the uses of construction materials. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CM 2315.

CM 2315. INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICS FOR CONSTRUCTION. 3 Hours.

Structural behavior in buildings; forces, moments, support reactions; free-body diagrams, equilibrium; internal forces in columns and beams; deflection; buckling. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 1303; Grade of C or better in PHYS 1441.

CM 2331. CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS. 3 Hours.

Introduction to construction documents and applicable software for use in communicating building design intentions to field personnel, including an understanding of how to interpret, explain, quantify and use construction documents to bid, construct and manage construction projects. Prerequisite: CM 2311.

CM 2391. PROBLEMS IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Selected problems in construction management on an individual or group basis. Reference material is assigned and progress conferences are held frequently, by arrangement, with a faculty supervisor. Prerequisite: Permission of the chair of the department.

CM 3313. CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATING I. 3 Hours.

Systems approach to determining required quantities of construction materials; quantification of various types of foundation systems, structural systems and building envelope systems; excerpts of contract documents from a variety of different building projects and materials. Prerequisite: CM 2311.

CM 3315. CONSTRUCTION LAW AND ETHICS. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic contract and tort issues and their application in the construction industry; delineation of the various types of contracts and remedies available to parties involved in a construction project; additional related topics including bidding, delays, mechanics liens, site conditions, warranties and the Uniform Commercial Code as it relates to the construction industry. Prerequisite: CM 2311, CM 2313.

CM 3331. MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS. 3 Hours.

Mechanical and electrical systems with a major emphasis on estimating and installation, design and control of the electrical, heating, ventilation and cooling system, site planning and acoustical treatments. Prerequisite: PHYS 1442.

CM 3333. CONSTRUCTION DESIGN I. 3 Hours.

The principles flexure and shear, deflections, buckling are used to consider design/build construction including building systems, building codes, criteria and selection, economic feasibility, value engineering, customer control, and value-added construction services as well as an introduction to Building Information Modeling BIM. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CM 2315.

CM 3335. SOILS AND FOUNDATION IN CONSTRUCTION. 3 Hours.

Introduction to soil types found on construction projects; properties and classification of soil, embankment control, dewatering, excavation supports, foundations, piers, and pilings. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CM 2315.

CM 3337. CONSTRUCTION ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS. 3 Hours.

Project planning, cost controls, and construction related financial documents including: schedule of values, labor and operations cost reports, income statements, balance sheets and construction budgets; emphasis on the development of techniques required to ethically and effectively monitor the financial aspects of a construction project. Prerequisite: CM 2331, MATH 1303.

CM 3339. CONSTRUCTION SAFETY. 3 Hours.

Examines the application of OSHA 29CFR 1926 for the construction industry along with applicable state and federal construction safety laws pertaining to construction, altercations, or repair work at a construction site. Prerequisite: CM 2331.

CM 4111. CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAPSTONE I. 1 Hour.

This course is the first in the Construction Management capstone series and provides project definition, project planning, scheduling, and results in a presentation and plan for implementing during Capstone II. Prerequisite: CM 3333.

CM 4300. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Advanced topics of current interest in any one of the various fields of construction management. The subject title to be listed in the class schedule. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: Admission to the professional program and consent of the department chair.

CM 4301. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT WITH LAB. 3 Hours.

Advanced topics of current interest in any one of the various fields of construction management. The subject title to be listed in the class schedule. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: Admission to the professional program and permission of the chair of the department.

CM 4313. CONSTRUCTION DESIGN II. 3 Hours.

Application of statics and strength of materials for construction of steel buildings with computer analysis and design. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CM 3333.

CM 4315. CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATING II. 3 Hours.

Quantification and pricing of direct field costs and general condition costs from construction documents; the preparation of complete lump sum bid package ready for project execution; utilization of complete set of contract documents required. Prerequisite: CM 3313.

CM 4317. CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULING. 3 Hours.

An introduction to construction project management scheduling covering concepts of project selection and scheduling, utilizing the estimate to predict the schedule, scheduling subcontracting, cost controls, project documentation, construction bonds, insurance, payments and the elements of close out; development of professional communication skills through student prepared multi-media presentations. Prerequisite: CM 3313.

CM 4331. CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAPSTONE II. 3 Hours.

Utilize information from all previous courses to give an understanding of the construction management profession culminating in a semester project and presentation. A response to an RFP announcement or bid will be prepared for each team project. Prerequisite: CM 4111.

CM 4333. APPLIED STRUCTURAL SYSTEM DESIGN. 3 Hours.

Structural principles applied to the design and construction of architectural reinforced concrete structures, reinforced masonry structures, and other selected topics. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CM 4313.

CM 4351. BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING FOR CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Introduction to techniques used in development and management of Building Information Models. Emphasis on constructability and management.

CM 4353. COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION. 3 Hours.

A senior course for students preparing to enter the commercial construction sector; project management of commercial construction projects, including: aspects of design, bidding/estimating, presentation, value engineering, contracts/negotiation, subcontractor relations, cost controls, management during construction, close out, and post-construction requirements.

CM 4355. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF TEMPORARY STRUCTURES. 3 Hours.

Design and construction of the temporary structures that contractors create to facilitate the construction of the primary structure, including formwork; scaffolding; support of excavation systems; and equipment for hoisting materials, personnel, and erecting structures. Prerequisite: CM 4313.

CM 4357. SUSTAINABLE BUILDING PRACTICE. 3 Hours.

Ethics and application of environmental sustainability practice in building construction. Introduction to U.S. Green Building Council LEED program standards, methods, and procedures as applied to construction documents interpretation and construction.

CM 4359. INTERNSHIP. 3 Hours.

Program provides for a learning experience in a construction management environment appropriate to the undergraduate level of work with a minimum of 150 hours of work. A written report of the experience and a presentation are required. Prerequisite: Permission of advisor.

CM 4391. PROBLEMS IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Selected problems in construction management on an individual or group basis. Reference material is assigned and progress conferences are held frequently, by arrangement, with a faculty supervisor. Prerequisite: Permission of the chair of the department.

CM 5300. TOPICS IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Topics of current interest in the field of construction management. The subject title is listed in the class schedule and in the student's record. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

CM 5301. TOPICS IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT WITH LAB. 3 Hours.

Topics of current interest in the field of construction management. The subject title is listed in the class schedule and in the student's record. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

CM 5339. STATISTICS FOR CONSTRUCTION. 3 Hours.

Point estimation, interval estimation, sample size determination, tests of hypothesis, analysis of variance, linear regression, matrix methods for multiple linear regression, polynomial regression, transformations, non-linear regression. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CE 3301.

CM 5340. CONSTRUCTION PROJECT ACQUISITION. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of acquiring the required goods and services necessary to fulfill the obligations of the construction contract. Service and subcontractor contracts, negotiating tactics and strategies, material pricing; and dispute resolution. The course includes negotiation practice based on typical construction acquisition situations to help prepare the student with experience of negotiating in the real world of construction and business. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

CM 5342. CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Topics in construction management and project administration, such as project delivery system, documentation and specification, electronic project administration, construction safety, risk allocation and liability sharing, changes and extra work, claims and disputes, and project closeout. Credit not granted for CE 4303 and CM 5342.

CM 5343. BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING. 3 Hours.

Introduction to current Building Information Modeling (BIM); Discussion of the role of BIM in Construction Engineering and Management; Revit Architecture, Structure, and MEP; Creating sets, building elements, structural systems, and MEP systems; BIM and clash detection; BIM and Construction Cost Estimating and Scheduling.

CM 5344. CONSTRUCTION METHODS: FIELD OPERATIONS. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the methods, equipment, and management techniques used in the construction industry. Topics include equipment operating characteristics, job site safety, and field management. Credit not granted for CE 4332 and CM 5344.

CM 5345. INFRASTRUCTURE EVALUATION, MAINTENANCE, AND RENEWAL. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for engineers and managers involved in infrastructure development, sustainability, and replacement. Topics include asset management, inspection, evaluation, maintenance, and renewal alternatives for waste collection and water distribution systems, surface and subsurface drainage, pavements, bridges, culverts, buildings, and other structures. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

CM 5350. RISK MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

The risk management process including risk identification, monitoring, and control; integrated quantitative cost and schedule risk analysis. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 1308.

CM 5355. CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS. 3 Hours.

Principles of construction related to construction regulations and standards, loads, fire safety, acoustics, joints and sealants. Systems of construction involving concrete, steel, wood, masonry, sealants, and soil, and including excavations, below grade construction, formwork, cladding, joints, windows, doors, roofing, and ceilings.

CM 5377. CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGEMENT & JOB COSTING. 3 Hours.

Financial aspects and job costing of a construction project. Includes project management principles, budgets, cost codes, cost-to-complete, and financial reports specific to the management of a construction company and project control. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

CM 5378. CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS, SPECIFICATIONS, & ADMINISTRATION. 3 Hours.

Types of construction contracts, contractual relationship between general contractor and owner, contractual relationship between general contractor and subcontractors, legal issues in construction administration, insurance, and concepts in value engineering. Reading and evaluating specifications, CSI Master Format. Credit not granted for CE 4304 and CM 5378. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

CM 5379. CONSTRUCTION COST ESTIMATING. 3 Hours.

Types of estimates, development of unit costs, quantity takeoff, cost estimating using manual methods and computerized cost estimating, budgets, and costs. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CE 5386.

CM 5381. PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP FOR INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS. 3 Hours.

Public-private partnership (P3) arrangements as an innovative approach to deliver public infrastructure projects. Topics include P3 benefits, limitations, contracting and implementation strategies. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CE 3310 or IE 2308, or consent of instructor.

CM 5382. CONSTRUCTION SUSTAINABILITY. 3 Hours.

Introduction to International Code Council's 2012 International Building Code and USGBC's LEED® New Construction Guidelines v.3 for constructing sustainable/green buildings. Review of building occupancy categories, construction types, allowable height and area, life safety requirements, rated building assemblies, and egress. Site selection, energy and water efficiency, material reuse and indoor air quality. Credit not granted for CE 4307 and CM 5382.

CM 5386. CONSTRUCTION PLANNING & SCHEDULING. 3 Hours.

Construction productivity, planning, & scheduling of operations, flow charts, linear programming, critical path method (CPM), program evaluation review techniques (PERT), precedence networks. Computer methods. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CM 5379.

CM 5387. CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTIVITY. 3 Hours.

Evaluation of construction project management's effectiveness. An investigation of the advanced techniques required for improvement of construction projects including time, cost, quality management, preplanning, field evaluation techniques, time-lapse photograph, safety, human factors, and communications. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CE 5379 and grade of C or better in CE 5386; or consent of instructor.

CM 5388. PIPELINE CONSTRUCTION AND TRENCHLESS TECHNOLOGY. 3 Hours.

Pipeline and utility design, construction and renewal. Topics include pipeline infrastructure structural considerations, planning and construction considerations, pipe materials, and trenchless technologies. Credit not granted for CE 4305 and CE 5388. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

CM 5389. PIPELINE SYSTEMS ASSET MANAGEMENT. 3 Hours.

Pipeline systems asset management, inventory, inspection, and life cycle costs. Topics include pipeline deterioration parameters, asset management technologies, risk assessment, government regulations, renewal technologies, and case studies. Credit not granted for CE 4306 and CE 5389. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.